Guv Brown Agency to San Diego: “Ignore Vote of People to Reform Pensions—You Must go Bankrupt—WE Demand it”

The people of San Diego had a choice—either reform the out of control pension system or go bankrupt. In fact, 70% of the voters declared they wanted reforms—and voted to save the pension system while stopping the impending bankruptcy. Now a single government agency, appointed by the really confused Guv Brown has declared that the vote of citizens is meaningless.

“The state Public Employment Relations Board on Wednesday ordered the city of San Diego to rescind a voter-approved pension reform measure and once again offer pensions to city employees.

Proposition B, passed by an overwhelming margin three years ago, shifted new non-police employees from the debt-ridden pension system to a 401(k)-style plan. The ballot measure was a major part of efforts by city leaders to restructure municipal finances.

Four of the city’s six organized labor groups filed a complaint with the PERB, contending that the city failed to bargain the provisions of the ballot measure with them before it went to a public vote, as required by law.”

Who needs election as long as you have a totalitarian Governor informing citizens what they are allowed to vote on and how to vote. If the citizens “vote wrong” the governor will have an agency “correct the mistake”. Why don’t people vote? Because it not not count or matter—Jerry and Barack will tell you what is allowed.

Photo courtesy of DonkeyHotey, flickr

Photo courtesy of DonkeyHotey, flickr

State Orders City to Rescind Carl DeMaio’s Prop. B, Offer Pensions Again

by Ken Stone, Times of San Diego, 12/30/15

The state Public Employment Relations Board on Wednesday ordered the city of San Diego to rescind a voter-approved pension reform measure and once again offer pensions to city employees.

Proposition B, passed by an overwhelming margin three years ago, shifted new non-police employees from the debt-ridden pension system to a 401(k)-style plan. The ballot measure was a major part of efforts by city leaders to restructure municipal finances.

Four of the city’s six organized labor groups filed a complaint with the PERB, contending that the city failed to bargain the provisions of the ballot measure with them before it went to a public vote, as required by law.

The city, arguing against the complaint, said the requirement didn’t apply, since Proposition B was sponsored by private citizens, and that municipal leaders who campaigned for it weren’t acting in their official capacities.

“It comes as no surprise that a state government board dominated by the unions would side with a bogus complaint filed by the unions,” former Councilman Carl DeMaio, an author of Prop. B, told Times of San Diego via email.

“This complaint will be laughed out of court because it is clear in the state Constitution that voters have the right to use initiatives to reform their government.”

The board affirmed a previous ruling by an administrative law judge that officials, including then-Mayor Jerry Sanders, in fact were acting in their city roles.

City Attorney Jan Goldsmith said the PERB ruling was expected. The city has prevailed in court once already on the issue, he said.

“We will be bringing this matter to the (City) Council in closed session as quickly as possible,” Goldsmith said. “If the council authorizes an appeal to the courts, we are confident that PERB will lose again. The law does not give labor unions the power to negotiate the terms of a citizens’ initiative.”

Craig Gustafson, press secretary for Mayor Kevin Faulconer, said he was also confident the city would prevail in an appeal. Faulconer was a strong supporter of the initiative.

If the PERB ruling is upheld in court, the city would not only have to enroll employees hired in the past couple of years into the pension system, but offer 7 percent interest on differences in benefits.

Voice of San Diego summarized the measure in 2013: Then-Mayor Jerry “Sanders and Councilman Kevin Faulconer developed a pension initiative in the months before the measure went on the ballot. Then-Councilman Carl DeMaio worked with the San Diego County Taxpayers Association and the Lincoln Club simultaneously on a separate initiative. The two groups later agreed on one initiative.”

 

 

Violent Crime UP 19.9% In Los Angeles in ONE YEAR

Policies have consequences. November of 2014 saw the passage of Prop. 47-a measure that made many felonies into misdemeanors, lowered felony penalties, stopped prosecutions and added tens of thousands of criminals back to the streets. This, after AB 109 released more than 50,000 criminals from prison, because a judge felt they were “uncomfortable”. Decisions like this have results.

“Violent crime climbed 19.9 percent compared with the previous year, marking the second consecutive year such crimes — which includes rape, robbery, aggravated assault to homicide — have gone up. There have been 280 homicides this year, up from 254 last year, a 10.2 percent increase.

Property crime is up 10.3 percent over last year.

At the same time thanks to the Mayor of LA, Obama, and the media, police are afraid to stop crime, since if they do, they are the one’s sued, on trial and lose their futures. The “Ferguson” effect is real—now thousands of people in Los Angeles are new crime victims thanks to Prop. 47 and elected officials that protect criminals and throw decent citizens to the curb. Sick. Angry yet?

Police tape

L.A. crime rates increase for the first time in 10 years

by Hoa Quach, MyNewsLA, 12/30/15

Los Angeles crime rates this year are on track to rise for the first time in more than 10 years, with increases in both violent and property crime categories, according to figures released Wednesday by the Los Angeles Police Department.

Crime is up 10.3 percent in Los Angeles, as of Saturday, compared with the same stretch last year, and is expected to reverse a 12-year trend of declining crime in the city.

All categories of crime, both violent and property crime, saw increases.

Violent crime climbed 19.9 percent compared with the previous year, marking the second consecutive year such crimes — which includes rape, robbery, aggravated assault to homicide — have gone up. There have been 280 homicides this year, up from 254 last year, a 10.2 percent increase.

Property crime is up 10.3 percent over last year.

Police officials and

Mayoral spokeswoman Vicki Curry responded to the rising crime rates today, saying Garcetti and police Chief Charlie Beck “are taking proactive and comprehensive steps to reduce crime.”

These measures include shifting more officers to the Metro Division, where they can be deployed quickly to areas experiencing the most crime, she said.

More resources were also put into community-oriented policing efforts and an additional $5.5 million was allocated for the city’s gang prevention program.

Curry noted that the city “remains safer than any time since the 1950s, but that’s little comfort to those whose lives have been impacted by crime.”

Curry said Garcetti “is confident that we can address any crime increases in a holistic way that engages communities and partners with all Angelenos to build a stronger, safer city.”

Jerry Brown/Barack Obama Economy: Bad for Poor and Middle Class

Stop listening to the lies (misrepresentations is too mild a word) of Jerry Brown who says we have a “balanced budget” while forgetting (after all he is very confused) the $1.5TRILLION debt of the State of California, per the State Treasurer. Then you have the serial lawbreaker Barack Obama—who thinks Congress is a waste of money, so why enforce the laws passed by them—who says our economy is doing well. Just look at the Food Banks and you can tell the poor and middle class are getting poorer.

Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo counties is $6 million short of its $15 million goal in a year when the food bank has actually seen a 5-6 percent increase in people in need.

“That’s a little bit gulp-inducing,” said Second Harvest Food Bank CEO Kathy Jackson. “The truth is that with all the good news about the economy, the concern is that the community doesn’t realize that there are actually more people seeking help than what was true a year ago.”

Jackson attributed the increase in residents seeking help from the food bank to the skyrocketing cost of rent in Silicon Valley.”

Yet at the same time Obama is bringing in tens of thousands of illegal aliens and Brown is begging for as many Syrian refugees and terrorists as can be brought to the former Golden State.

Daniellle Brown

No Signs of Improving Economy at Struggling Food Banks

By Ericka Cruz Guevarra, KQED, 12/30/15

The good news is that parts of the economy may be improving. The bad news is that those improvements have lulled people into a false sense of security — even as many still struggle to make ends meet. That struggle is playing out at Bay Area food banks, where fundraising isn’t meeting demand.

Second Harvest Food Bank of Santa Clara and San Mateo counties is $6 million short of its $15 million goal in a year when the food bank has actually seen a 5-6 percent increase in people in need.

“That’s a little bit gulp-inducing,” said Second Harvest Food Bank CEO Kathy Jackson. “The truth is that with all the good news about the economy, the concern is that the community doesn’t realize that there are actually more people seeking help than what was true a year ago.”

Jackson attributed the increase in residents seeking help from the food bank to the skyrocketing cost of rent in Silicon Valley.

“The average rent in Silicon Valley is up 12 percent over last year,” said Jackson. “If your rent has gone up $300-$400, that may have been your food budget.”

The problem isn’t just in Silicon Valley, though. The San Francisco-Marin Food Bank is $500,000 short, compared with donations at the same time last year.

‘The truth is that with all the good news about the economy, the concern is that the community doesn’t realize that there are actually more people seeking help than what was true a year ago.’

“The economy couldn’t be better in San Francisco,” said SF-Marin Food Bank executive director Paul Ash. “There’s no distractions, there’s no disaster somewhere that should pull people’s interest away, and we just are seeing a slower level of giving than we’ve seen in past years.”

In Alameda County, where Oakland recently ascended to the fourth- most-expensive rental market in the U.S., Alameda County Community Food Bank’s communications manager Michael Alfest hesitates to say things are going well.

“The next few days are critical days of the year for us,” said Alfest. “This time of year really drives us to serve our community well into 2016. After New Year’s we won’t see the kind of donations we see during the holidays.”

Currently one in five Alameda County residents rely on food banks, surpassing the national average.

“We’re going to see the same struggles, if not even greater struggles for quite some time,” said Alfest.

At least one food bank says it’s doing OK. The Food Bank of Contra Costa and Solano County is on track as far as food donations go, but its monetary donations are still $400,000 short of a $3 million goal for 2015.

“Like the other food banks in the area, it is critical that we meet our goal to continue our services in 2016 at the level we have been,” said Lisa Sherrill, communications director at the food bank. “People have hunger at the top of their minds during the holidays.”

With more students on holiday break, Alfest and Jackson said the need for donations during this time of the year is all the more urgent. Both said that extended school closures are times when families are not able to rely on school lunches for their children.

“During holidays, every family has more things pulling at the available cash flow than at any other time for the year,” said Jackson.

The last few days of the year have historically served as a critical time for donations. Last year, the Alameda County Community Food Bank pulled in $330,000 in the final three days of the year. And it’s certainly hoping to repeat that this year.

To make a donation:

KQED’s Bay Area Bites also put together a volunteering and donation guide. Many local food banks accept donations year-round, with the need for help actually increasing again after the holidays.

Alfest said that sometimes the food donated during the holidays is left sitting in warehouses because of a shortage in volunteers in February and March.

“The community has always supported us and has never refused to step up,” said Jackson. “The campaign for us is really critical this year. … And most people are not expecting that right now.”

 

Alameda Co. Officials Hold Firm On Pledge To Avoid Public Stadium Subsidy Ahead Of NFL Vote To Relocate Raiders

Is this really good news? “Oakland and Alameda County officials on Tuesday submitted a letter to the National Football League outlining progress toward developing plans for a new stadium for the Oakland Raiders, but it remains unclear if their efforts will be enough to keep the team in the city.” This is a real waste of tax dollars and the time and efforts of government officials. If the Raiders want to stay in Oakland, or leave Oakland, then it is up to them, not government to “present a plan”. How does government get in trouble and taxpayers made poor? All it takes is for government to interfere in the private markets.

“Schaaf said the city provided more details about potential new public revenue sources that could be generated by development at the 120-acre Oakland Coliseum complex site. In addition, it notes progress made toward freeing the O.co Coliseum from bond debt that limits redevelopment options and shifting Alameda County’s share of the Coliseum site to Oakland, simplifying the site’s ownership.

The deal outlined in the letter offers the Raiders a long-term lease on the south 60 acres of the Coliseum site, at least 8,000 surface parking spaces plus development rights to 9 acres around the Coliseum BART station. The team would own the stadium and rights to game revenues, while the city would retain ownership of the underlying land.

Forget the phony headline—government IS going to spend hundreds of millions to “keep” the Raiders. Read the story, not the headline. Once again the billionaires are stealing from the poor and middle class for their play toys.

http://www.dreamstime.com/-image16423634

Alameda Co. Officials Hold Firm On Pledge To Avoid Public Stadium Subsidy Ahead Of NFL Vote To Relocate Raiders

By Susan C. Schena, Alameda Patch,   12/30/15

The letter was submitted in response to a Dec. 4 request by the NFL for more information ahead of an owners meeting next month to consider applications from teams hoping to relocate to a new city, including the Raiders. In a news conference at City Hall Tuesday, Schaaf remained upbeat about the city’s prospects and the desire of Raiders owner Mark Davis to remain in Oakland, but she acknowledged that the letter fell short of a detailed financial plan.

“We do not have a formal proposal to submit to the NFL,” Schaaf said, repeatedly emphasizing that officials are in the “discussion stage” and have not yet entered formal negotiations with the Raiders.

The letter was broadly similar to a presentation made to the NFL on Nov. 11, in which Schaaf touted Oakland’s development potential and strength as a real estate and job market, its transit-rich stadium site and the fact that the city has an approved land development plan and environmental approval already in place.

Schaaf said the city provided more details about potential new public revenue sources that could be generated by development at the 120-acre Oakland Coliseum complex site. In addition, it notes progress made toward freeing the O.co Coliseum from bond debt that limits redevelopment options and shifting Alameda County’s share of the Coliseum site to Oakland, simplifying the site’s ownership.

The deal outlined in the letter offers the Raiders a long-term lease on the south 60 acres of the Coliseum site, at least 8,000 surface parking spaces plus development rights to 9 acres around the Coliseum BART station. The team would own the stadium and rights to game revenues, while the city would retain ownership of the underlying land.

Schaaf on Tuesday said the city would consider giving the team land only in an exchange for something of value.

Schaaf said the city has been up front with the Raiders and the NFL about the complexity of its situation. Not only is the Coliseum complex jointly owned by the city and county and burdened by debt from a previous stadium deal, O.co Coliseum is also the only stadium in the United States shared by professional football and baseball teams.

The city is also currently in talks with the Oakland A’s, who have a 10-year lease, about the possible construction of a new ballpark, either at the Coliseum site or at another location, Schaaf said. The Golden State Warriors, who currently play at Oracle Arena on the Coliseum complex, are expected to move to a new arena in San Francisco.

Most importantly, Schaaf said, the city has been clear that while it is willing to underwrite infrastructure development on the site, at an estimated cost of around $90 million, and discuss the use of future potential development revenues, it will not commit existing public funds to a stadium project. This puts the city unusual in an situation where others are offering large public subsidies.

“We will not repeat mistakes of the past,” she said.

The Raiders are one of three National Football League teams considering moving to the Los Angeles area next fall. The San Diego Chargers are considering sharing a new stadium in Carson with the Raiders and the St. Louis Rams are thinking of moving to a new stadium in Inglewood, which is also in the Los Angeles area.

Teams that want to apply to relocate to a new city may do so after Jan. 1 and NFL owners will consider proposals at a special meeting on Jan. 12 and 13. But three-fourths of the owners of the league’s 32 teams must approve any team moves.

 

New California Health Laws: Check Your Constitutional Rights at the State Border—BEFORE Entering

Did you really think the U.S. Constitution was applicable to California laws? Why would you believe that the health of your child is your responsibility instead of the State proclaiming you to be just a sperm and egg donor—like any other totalitarian State your children belong to government not you. SB 277, the forced vaccination of children by order of government is the best example of how Sacramento owns your kids—but when they get sick because of political ideologue, YOU pay the financial and emotional bills.

SB 277 was perhaps the most vehemently debated bill in Sacramento in a long time. Sen. Richard Pan (D-Sacramento) introduced the bill just weeks after a measles outbreak tied to Disneyland. The law requires that all children be fully vaccinated to attend school — both public and private — unless they have a medical exemption. The law takes effect July 1, in advance of the 2016-2017 school year. A second law related to vaccines requires all child-care workers to be vaccinated against measles, pertussis and influenza.”

Oh, along with the abortion of babies, Sacramento has also approved government allowed murder—“ Physician-Assisted Suicide: Gov. Jerry Brown signed the End of Life Option Act into law with an unusually personal comment. The law permits physicians to prescribe lethal medication to terminally ill patients who request it.” Request it? Maybe talked into it or just done to them is more accurate.

Photo courtesy Franco Folini, flickr

Photo courtesy Franco Folini, flickr

California’s New Health Laws Coming in 2016

The fight over SB277, the new law that requires California children to be vaccinated to

By Lisa Aliferis, KQED, 12/30/15

The new year arrives Friday, and with it a host of new state laws.

Here’s our roundup of new ones coming in health. Most take effect on Friday, except where noted:

Vaccines: SB 277 was perhaps the most vehemently debated bill in Sacramento in a long time. Sen. Richard Pan (D-Sacramento) introduced the bill just weeks after a measles outbreak tied to Disneyland. The law requires that all children be fully vaccinated to attend school — both public and private — unless they have a medical exemption. The law takes effect July 1, in advance of the 2016-2017 school year. A second law related to vaccines requires all child-care workers to be vaccinated against measles, pertussis and influenza.

Physician-Assisted Suicide: Gov. Jerry Brown signed the End of Life Option Act into law with an unusually personal comment. The law permits physicians to prescribe lethal medication to terminally ill patients who request it. There is no firm date for the law to go into effect because it was passed as part of an ongoing special legislative session that was called by the governor to address health care financing. It won’t take effect until 90 days after the session ends. California became the fifth state to allow the practice, along with Oregon, Washington, Montana and Vermont.

Medi-Cal for Undocumented Children: California became the first state in the country to extend state-subsidized health coverage to children who are living in the United States illegally. An estimated 170,000 children under age 19 will become eligible for Medi-Cal, the state’s health insurance problem for people who are low income, when the law goes into effect on May 1. (Legislators are expected to consider SB10, which would extend Medi-Cal to adults, in 2016 as well.)

Reproductive Services Notification: The new law covers required notifications at two types of facilities. Unlicensed facilities now will be required to notify clients that they are not licensed as medical facilities by the state. Meanwhile, licensed medical facilities are required to notify clients that California has public programs that provide free or low-cost access to contraceptives, prenatal care and abortion services. The law was challenged by centers that do not provide abortions. Just before Christmas, a federal judge upheld the law.

Translation of Prescription Drug Information: Pharmacists are now required, upon request, to provide labels or medication information in the five most common languages in California, after English: Spanish, Tagalog, Chinese, Vietnamese or Korean.

Hospitals and Caregivers: AB675 requires hospitals to include family caregivers in the hospitalization and discharge process. The goal is to improve a patient’s care and reduce the chance of readmission. California is one of 18 states to pass this type of law in the last two years.

CONSUMER PROTECTIONS:

  • Caps on Drug Copays: This law limits patient’s cost-sharing on specialty drugs to $250 a month and prohibits placing most or all drugs used to treat a certain condition on the highest cost tier in drug formularies.
  • Accurate Provider Directories: Insurers now must maintain an accurate database of providers on a website — and they must update that directory every week, under this new law.  The directories will include languages spoken by providers other than English.
  • Cost-sharing Limits in Family Plans: This law brings California into line with federal regulations, that an individual patient faces the out-of-pocket maximum set by the Affordable Care Act (now $6,600) for an individual, even if they are in a family plan (which has a max of $13,200 at present).
  • Insurance offered by Large Employers: Large employers must now follow consumer protections that ensure they do not offer so-called junk insurance that does not offer minimum value, as defined.

LGBT HEALTH CARE:

  • Sperm Donation: AB960 was inspired by lesbian couples who want to have children. Many receive sperm donations from friends or relatives. This law says that the donor will not be viewed as the “natural parent” unless otherwise agreed to in writing prior to conception of the child.
  • Demographic Data Collection: This law requires state departments overseeing health programs to collect voluntary information about sexual orientation and gender identity just as they collect race and ethnicity data.

FOSTER CHILDREN:

  • Placements for Trans Children: Foster children now have the right to placements consistent with their gender identity.
  • Psychotropic Medications: Child welfare social workers will be better able to oversee mental health treatments, including use of psychotropic medications, by foster children.
  • Foster Children Who Are Parents: This law provides support and protections for foster children who are parents themselves.

 

Unions Going Ballistic: LAUSD May Allow Half of Students Quality Education

This is intolerable. A very rich man and his buddies want to force Los Angeles students to receive a quality education. Worse, they are demanding that teachers be allowed to keep extortionists from stealing from their paychecks. The unions, which own and control the “elected” school board (elected with money stolen by the unions from teachers and given to candidates that accept theft of teachers paychecks).

“Broad’s plan is ambitious, to be sure. In addition to fighting the school board and union, Broad and his foundation allies would need considerable community support to succeed. Charters already make up a sizable portion of schools in the district: nearly a quarter of LAUSD students—about 150,866 students—are enrolled in 282 charter schools from San Pedro to the San Fernando Valley. Another 40,000 students languish on waiting lists. The demand is there; it’s the supply that’s lacking, though procuring facilities for 260 new schools would take some doing.

In Los Angeles schools are for the financial and political benefit of the unions and Leftist politicians—not the children. It saddens me that the parents continue to vote for candidates that enslave instead of educate their children. I blame the parents 100%.

200px-LAUSD_Logo.svg

A Half-Charter School District for L.A.?

Eli Broad has a plan to shake up America’s second-largest school district.

Larry Sand, City Journal, 12/30/15

Eli Broad made his fortune in construction and real estate. But he’s building a legacy as a philanthropist and an education reformer. In September, the Broad, a $140 million museum of contemporary art, opened in downtown Los Angeles at the corner of a revitalizing Grand Avenue and 2nd Street, across from the Walt Disney Concert Hall. That same month, the Los Angeles Times published a leaked memo detailing Broad’s proposal to revitalize L.A.’s sclerotic public school system. Working under the auspices of his family foundation, Broad would gather some of the biggest names in private philanthropy—Gates, Walton, Ahmanson, Bloomberg, Annenberg, and Hewlett, as well as David Geffen, Kirk Kerkorian, and Elon Musk—to open 260 new charter schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District over an eight-year period, with an enrollment goal of at least 130,000 students. The memo discusses how to raise $490 million to pay for the effort, which includes recruiting teachers, acquiring real estate, providing outreach to parents, and navigating political battles. If the octogenarian Broad succeeds, half of L.A. Unified’s schools would be charters by the mid-2020s.

Naturally, L.A.’s education establishment detests the idea. The LAUSD board’s president, Steve Zimmer, denounced Broad’s plan as “a strategy to bring down LAUSD.” In November, board member Scott Schmerelson pushed a resolution announcing the board’s opposition to the Broad Foundation’s plan by name. Later, Schmerelson changed the language to say the board opposed any “external initiatives that seek to reduce public education to an educational marketplace and our children to market shares while not investing in District-wide programs and strategies that benefit every student.” As an L.A. Times editorial pointed out, by that standard, “the board would have to oppose many of its own programs—magnet schools, programs to teach students fluency in English and alternative schools for students with chronic behavioral problems.” (In response, Broad’s new educational nonprofit expanded its proposal to support traditional public schools, including pilots, magnets, and other high-performing schools that serve low-income children.)

Former LAUSD superintendent Ramon C. Cortines was more charitable. At a forum with Los Angeles Times columnist Steve Lopez earlier this month, Cortines didn’t ascribe ill motives to Broad, but rather suggested the billionaire was ill advised. “I think somebody brought him an elixir without having it be tested to see if it will really do what it is promised to do,” he said. But United Teachers of Los Angeles president Alex Caputo-Pearl was predictably unsparing in his vitriol. “Billionaires should not be running public education,” he said. The union boss also claimed that charter schools are unregulated and “deregulation doesn’t work.” Not to be outdone, retired kindergarten teacher Cheryl Ortega groused, “Charter schools are destroying public education.”

Broad’s plan is ambitious, to be sure. In addition to fighting the school board and union, Broad and his foundation allies would need considerable community support to succeed. Charters already make up a sizable portion of schools in the district: nearly a quarter of LAUSD students—about 150,866 students—are enrolled in 282 charter schools from San Pedro to the San Fernando Valley. Another 40,000 students languish on waiting lists. The demand is there; it’s the supply that’s lacking, though procuring facilities for 260 new schools would take some doing.

California’s 1992 charter school law gives local districts the power to approve or deny charter applications, though applications cannot be denied without good reason, such as questionable management or shady finances. However, the district doesn’t have the last word. Charter applicants have the option to appeal first to the county board of education, and then to the state board of education, if necessary.

A closer look at many of the antagonists’ complaints reveals less anger about billionaires’ meddling in education than envy that Broad’s largess doesn’t extend to traditional public schools. But the schools already receive plenty of money. Official per-pupil spending in Los Angeles is $13,490, which is greater than the national average and doesn’t include expenses such as the cost of building and maintaining schools, interest on various payments, bonds, and so forth. When those expenditures get added in, per-pupil spending comes to about $30,000 per year. If the new California Assessment of Student Progress and Performance (CAASPP) scores are any indication, the money is not being well-spent. Only a third of the city’s students performed at grade level in English, while about a quarter performed at grade level or better in math. The district’s charter school students far outpaced their peers in traditional schools.

Don’t believe the anti-reform hype about lax regulation and looming public school destruction, either. Charter schools are public schools, funded by tax dollars and subject to regulation—just not to the same extent as traditional public schools, which are strangled by bulky union contracts that put seniority ahead of competence. Broad’s plan anticipates that 5,000 union members could be put out of work and replaced with staff hired through Teach For America, TNTP (formerly the New Teacher Project), and other groups that work with young instructors. The proposal makes no mention of recruiting teachers from within L.A. Unified.

Clearly, hundreds of new charter schools would find it difficult to fill their ranks with newbies. And therein lies an important but unstated aspect of the Broad plan. Those rehired from the current crop of experienced teachers would be the good and even great ones working now because they are qualified, not because they are protected by the state’s seniority statute. Needless to say, Caputo-Pearl has a different take. “The charters are specifically looking for educators who have not had the experience of being in a union,” he said, “which means that, by and large, they’re looking for teachers who may find it more challenging to raise their voice about curriculum or school conditions.” That’s absurd, of course. Where is it written that that only unionized teachers speak up about “curriculum and school conditions”?

Some of the naysayers claim that a half-charter district would leave too many children behind, but other cities’ experience suggests otherwise. Washington, D.C., and Detroit have moved in recent years to a 50 percent charter model. New Orleans may offer the best evidence of how charter schools can serve a low-income and underprivileged population. After Hurricane Katrina devastated the Crescent City in 2005, a much more vibrant charter system emerged in the aftermath. Today, 92 percent of the city’s students are enrolled in a charter school. Ten years ago, 62 percent of schools in Orleans Parish were failing. Today, just 7 percent of schools are failing. During the same period, the portion of city schools with students performing at or above grade level rose from 35 percent to 62 percent. As it happens, Paul Pastorek, the former superintendent of public education in Louisiana who helped oversee the turnaround, has been appointed to lead Broad’s effort in L.A.

Philanthropy has the power to transform institutions for the better. More charters in Los Angeles would certainly disrupt the dismal status quo—likely to the advantage of good teachers, their students, and taxpayers. Opponents see Broad’s proposal as a way of “bringing down LAUSD,” but building up alternatives to a dysfunctional system may be exactly what L.A.’s children need.

 

Obama Executive Order: American College Graduates to Fill Taco Shells—Foreign Graduates to Take YOUR Jobs

California students have among the highest debt when leaving college in the nation. To pay it off they must get well paying jobs. Yet, they also have to move in with parents, since they best jobs they can get, with a college degree, is filling taco shells and asking if you want a churro with that? Now President Obama is going to assure more young people with degrees live at home as long as possible.

“As the nation prepares to ring in the New Year, President Barack Obama is preparing a colossal new executive action that could print-up work permits for a huge number of foreign white-collar graduates every year, above and beyond the levels set by Congress.

This executive action, which directly bypasses Congressional lawmakers, is likely to reverberate across the presidential race, as GOP voters look to choose a nominee they believe will most effectively roll back the President’s still-expanding agenda.  And it will certainly raise new security concerns as it covers categories of immigration utilized by migrants from the Middle East and nearby regions.

President Obama is trying hard to prove to the world he is NOT an American, he is really auditioning to become the next Secretary-General of the United Nations—by harming the America economy and citizens. Shame on us and Congress for allowing this.

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New Year’s Surprise: Obama Regulation To Give Work-Permits To Foreign College-Graduates

by Neil Munro, Breitbart, 12/30/15

As the nation prepares to ring in the New Year, President Barack Obama is preparing a colossal new executive action that could print-up work permits for a huge number of foreign white-collar graduates every year, above and beyond the levels set by Congress.

This executive action, which directly bypasses Congressional lawmakers, is likely to reverberate across the presidential race, as GOP voters look to choose a nominee they believe will most effectively roll back the President’s still-expanding agenda.  And it will certainly raise new security concerns as it covers categories of immigration utilized by migrants from the Middle East and nearby regions.

President Barack Obama’s Department of Homeland Security plans to publish the proposed rule tomorrow, the last day of 2015.

The 181-page rule focuses primarily on giving work-permits to foreign college-grads who will compete against Americans for white collar jobs, despite the large number of American graduates now stuck in lower-wage positions and struggling to pay off college debts. The rule will also make each foreign graduate much cheaper for U.S. employers to hire than many U.S.-born college grads.

“Obama has gone the Full Monty to bust the immigration system,” says immigration lawyer John Miano. “What is going on is he is effectively giving Green Cards to people on H-1B visas who are unable to get Green Cards due to the [annual] quotas… it could be over 100,000.”

The new rules to aid foreign college-graduates are an extension of his earlier efforts to bypass popular laws against illegal immigration, said Miano, the co-author of a new book about the painful impact of the white-collar guest-worker programs, titled “Sold Out.”

This executive action could have been prevented, however, had the bipartisan 2016 omnibus funding included language proposed by Immigration Subcommittee Chairman

Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-AL)

80%

.

In April, Sessions proposed language to reduce and cap the number of work-permits — dubbed “Employment Authorization Documents” — that could be distributed to foreign workers each year. Sessions’ recommendation was rejected by GOP and Democratic leaders in Congress, and so House Speaker

Rep. Paul Ryan (R-WI)

56%

’s December omnibus is enabling the president’s new executive action.

In 2012, Obama bypassed laws against illegal immigration by awarding two-year work-permits to at least 800,000 younger foreign migrants who were brought here by their illegal immigrant parents. In 2015, the courts blocked his November 2014 amnesty plan to award work-permits to roughly 5 million resident migrants who have U.S.-born children. From 2009 to 2015, Obama also allowed at least 250,000 Central American migrants into the United States to request asylum or refugee status. In 2013, Obama added roughly 2 million extra foreign workers to the economy, while roughly 4 million young Americans began looking for work.

“The objective here is to strip American workers of their protections from foreign labor embodied in the Green Card quotas” that are set by Congress, not the White House, Miano said.

The annual award of Green Cards — and vital preliminary work-permits — is limited by quotas that mostly impact the many Indian and Chinese graduates who come to the United States as H-1B guest-workers, or who first arrive as students and later start working in the United States via the Optional Practical Training and H-1B programs.

Roughly 650,000 foreign graduates are working in the United States for roughly 5 years each under the H-1B program. Roughly 120,000 foreign graduates of U.S. colleges are working in the United States for two years each via the OPT program, often called the ‘mini-H-1B program.’ Without this new regulation, most of those foreign graduates will return home after several years, forcing companies to hire U.S. graduates in their place.

The foreign graduates typically get entry-level jobs that would otherwise go to new U.S. business graduates, designers, doctors, programmers, engineers and scientists.  Also, the foreign graduates are used to replace mid-level American professionals once they seek mid-career pay-raises to help pay for mortgages and child-rearing.

According to the pending regulation, “many of these changes are primarily aimed at improving the ability of U.S. employers to hire and retain [foreign] high-skilled workers who are beneficiaries of approved employment-based immigrant visa petitions and are waiting to become lawful permanent residents (LPRs), while increasing the ability of such [foreign] workers to seek promotions, accept lateral positions with current employers, change employers, or pursue other employment options.”

The new policy also creates a large economic incentive for U.S. employers to hire foreign college-grads instead of new American college-grads.

That’s because the policy will allow U.S. employers to hire foreign college graduates at very low salaries. The foreign graduates will gladly take those low-wage white-collar jobs because the new policy allows them to get deferred payments from the federal government — valuable permanent work-permits that are the first step on the golden pathway to Green Cards and citizenship.

In contrast, employers can’t pay American graduates with this combination of low-salaries plus the federal promise of citizenship — because the Americans already have citizenship.

That means employers must pay more money to hire American college-grads than they would to hire foreign college-grads. That puts a huge disadvantage on American graduates because they need higher salaries to pay off their expensive U.S. college debt.

Miano slammed the new regulations, and said they reflect Obama’s preference for foreigners over Americans.

“Notice that when foreign workers are going to lose their jobs, Obama has DHS make protecting their jobs the agency’s highest priority,” chiefly by minimizing enforcement of immigration laws, he told Breitbart News. But “when American workers lose their jobs to foreign workers, Obama does absolutely nothing,” he said.

“We have a president with a very warped sense of priorities,” he added.

The public can object to the new regulations, according to the DHS document.

DATES: Written comments must be received on or before [Insert date 60 days from date of publication in the FEDERAL REGISTER].

ADDRESSES: You may submit comments, identified by DHS Docket No. USCIS-2015-0008, by one of the following methods:

Federal eRulemaking Portal: You may submit comments to USCIS by visiting http://www.regulations.gov. Follow the instructions for submitting comments.

E-mail: You may submit comments directly to USCIS by e-mailing them to:

USCISFRComment@dhs.gov. Please include DHS Docket No. USCIS-2015-0008 in the subject line of the message.

 

San Fran Using Government Policy to Eliminate Blacks From City—Racism California Style

The Ku Klux Klan never understood economics. If they did, they could have eliminated blacks from the Southern States by using high prices, gentrification, rotten schools and police afraid of protecting citizens as the way to do it, instead of lynching’s and violence.

Los Angeles has one of the most segregated government school systems in the nation—less than 9% of the students are white. San Fran has only 13% white students—and that is declining each year. Want segregated schools—LA and San Fran makes 1960’s Montgomery, Alabama schools look integrated.

Thanks to the use of tax dollars to bring in technology firms, the cost of commercial space for small businesses and housing for everyone has skyrocketed. This has forced blacks out of town—and the rich whites replacing them want quality education for their children—not union education. This is how liberal racism happens, using your tax dollars for crony capitalists.

“A study by the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project suggests that San Francisco’s black population currently stands at 6%, compared to 13% in 1970. This is taking place as the city’s general population continues to rise. Breitbart’s Joel B. Pollak points out that this “steep decline began in the 1990s–right at the time the dot-com boom boosted the city’s financial fortunes, and as ultra-liberal policies returned to vogue in urban America.” Pollak also noted that “Economist Thomas Sowell blames environmentalists for promoting restrictions on housing construction that have made rental stock more scarce and more expensive, pushing many black families to leave the Bay Area over time.”

San Francisco, CA, USA

Blacks are Disappearing from Space-Starved San Francisco

by Adelle Nazarian, Breitbart CA, 12/30/15

San Francisco’s gentrification is slowly creeping into the Bay Area’s traditionally black neighborhoods, forcing out locals and slowly replacing them with Silicon Valley techies and professionals who are better able to afford higher prices.

“I love this place. This is really home,” Dwight Brown, a jobs activist who resides in the historically black Bayview-Hunters Point told the Associated Press. “But the writing on the wall was they’re taking it away from us. You’re not going to be able to live in San Francisco, unless you stand and fight for it.”

The AP points out that writer James Baldwin had once referred to the neighborhood as “the San Francisco America pretends does not exist.”

The average price of a home in San Francisco is $1.2 million. Homes in cheaper areas are being snatched up by those who are able to afford them–and soon they appreciate in value.

This October, a rotting earthquake shack in San Francisco sold for $408,000. In nearby Palo Alto, a tiny 180-square-foot shack was listed one month later for sale at $1.98 million.

The AP describes Bayview-Hunters Point as one of the last major frontiers for San Francisco development, with spectacular views of the San Francisco-Oakland Bay Bridge and downtown. However, a housing shortage is slowly catching up to the rest of the Bay Area and the neighborhood is losing a part of its black identity.

San Francisco has long prided itself on having an image as a bastion of diversity and progressive politics. However, a burgeoning tech population is quickly eroding that dynamic. A study released earlier this year by the San Francisco Foundation found that the city’s policies are rapidly ejecting blacks and Latinos to become a “lily white” island over the course of the next 25 years.

A study by the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project suggests that San Francisco’s black population currently stands at 6%, compared to 13% in 1970. This is taking place as the city’s general population continues to rise. Breitbart’s Joel B. Pollak points out that this “steep decline began in the 1990s–right at the time the dot-com boom boosted the city’s financial fortunes, and as ultra-liberal policies returned to vogue in urban America.” Pollak also noted that “Economist Thomas Sowell blames environmentalists for promoting restrictions on housing construction that have made rental stock more scarce and more expensive, pushing many black families to leave the Bay Area over time.”

And the trend has not gone unnoticed. This summer over $77,000 was raised on Kickstarter to fund a film aptly named The Last Black Man in San Francisco. The film tells the story of two San Francisco natives who form a close friendship as they grapple with race, class and displacement while San Francisco’s politicians use sales tax revenues from poor neighborhoods to offer fabulous tax incentives to high-tech companies that push out the Mission District’s dwindling Latino population and the Fillmore District’s traditionally black residents.

 

Small Sign of California Economy? Santa Barbara Transient Occupancy Taxes Decline 4% in November

It is not the noticeable housing bubble that is bringing down the California economy—when you have the highest housing costs in the nation—the poor and middle class get squeezed into slums and government created slums called affordable housing. Santa Barbara is one of the great tourist areas in the nation—mostly for the rich. Yet the “bed tax” is down for 2015, while hotel prices are up. One item not included as the cause is the expansion of AIRBNB and its’ look a likes, which do not charge a bed tax.

“The City of Santa Barbara’s Transient Occupancy Taxes (TOT) totaled over $1.16 million for the month of November, but this marked a 4 percent decline compared to last November, when the city made more than $1.21 million in TOT revenues, according to a chart released by the city’s Treasury Manager Julie Nemes.

We are watching the formation of a recession in slow motion. Wages are not growing, meaning the job growth, on balance, is in the field of filling taco shells, not well paying jobs in energy, while technology jobs are moving to Texas. Nationally and internationally the lowered price of oil signals an economic slowdown—watch for the next recession, it is here.

tax sign

Transient Occupancy Taxes Decline in November

City Report States Revenue Decreased 4 Percent Compared to Last Year

By Léna Garcia, Santa Barbara Independent, 12/30/15

The City of Santa Barbara’s Transient Occupancy Taxes (TOT) totaled over $1.16 million for the month of November, but this marked a 4 percent decline compared to last November, when the city made more than $1.21 million in TOT revenues, according to a chart released by the city’s Treasury Manager Julie Nemes.

The data makes this month’s decline the “largest since November 2010,” Nemes stated in a city press release. In the same release, city officials attribute the loss to a “1.4-percent decline” in occupancy rates, the closure of the Sandman Inn, and the fact that November 2015 had one less weekend night than November 2014.

“November 2015 TOT revenues are building upon two consecutive years of double-digit growth in the month of November,” Nemes added. From November 2013 to November 2014, TOT revenues increased an impressive 15.8 percent from $895,132 to $1,036,437. So far this fiscal year, the city reports it has collected about nine million in TOT revenues.

 

 

 

What California Recovery? Uneasy balancing act for CA economy

Obama is about to drop a bomb on California college graduates—he is using an Executive Order to allow foreign students to get green cards, after they graduates from our colleges, to get jobs in the United States. This will add to the massive unemployment of decent, honest Americans. Add to this the fact we have the worst and deadliest roads in the nation, Los Angeles had a 20% increase in crime in 2015, we have the highest gas, sales, income and corporate taxes in the nation.

California has a pension crisis, a government caused water disaster and laws that protect the “right” of criminals to massacre unarmed citizens. Illegal aliens take the jobs of the poor and middle class, this is a State about to have a collapse.

“Critics have warned that undue reliance on the seaboard, and on Silicon Valley in particular, would have risky distorting effects on policymakers’ views and deeds. Setting aside Silicon Valley and the Bay Area, for instance, “the Golden State’s employment growth between 2009 and 2014 and real gross domestic product per capita between 2009 and 2013 each drop about 2 percentage points,” as the Hoover Institution’s Carson Bruno observed. “This is a 55 percent reduction in economic growth and a 25 percent cut in employment growth for California without this one region.”

college graduate student education

Uneasy balancing act for CA economy

James Poulos, CalWatchdog, 12/30/15

California headed into 2016 with a stabilizing economy that nonetheless left many residents uneasy.

On the work front, the year finished out with weaker, but not alarming, numbers. “California employers added just 5,500 jobs in November, according to federal data — a significant slowdown from more robust monthly gains earlier in the year,” the Los Angeles Times reported. “But the state unemployment rate continued its five-year-long decline, dropping to 5.7 percent in November, the lowest in eight years.” By way of comparison, the nationwide unemployment rate has been hovering around 5 percent.

For a broader view of the economy, analysts looked to other factors. A string of reports reinforced the significance of Silicon Valley to the state’s health, although “red tape, high taxes and a burdensome cost of living” continued to dog Californians statewide, according to the San Jose Mercury News. “In one report, prepared by Beacon Economics for nonprofit group Next 10, a comprehensive look at California’s business climate determined that the Golden State is considerably more hospitable to business than suggested by conventional wisdom that sometimes elevates less costly states such as Texas,” the paper noted. “Another study, the Milken Institute’s annual Best-Peforming Cities Index, found that the San Jose metro area, which includes most of Santa Clara County, is the top performer for 2015.”

Two Californias

The analyses helped paint the picture of a state increasingly divided between a relatively prosperous coast and a more struggling interior. “By about 2 to 1, Californians believe the state is split between haves and have-nots, with slightly more people putting themselves in the latter category,” according to a survey reported by the Times and conducted by the Public Policy Institute of California. “Just fewer than half of Californians believe that the state will experience good economic times in the next year, but 41 percent say the economy will suffer tough times.”

Even cities just a few hours’ drive from Silicon Valley have limped toward recovery in the wake of the Great Recession. “Stockton, Fresno and Modesto were among the country’s 10 weakest performing metro regions in 2009, according to a Brookings Institution study, and in parts of the Inland Empire, 1 out of 75 homes was in some state of foreclosure — the fourth-highest count in the nation,” as the San Francisco Chronicle reported. “While the Bay Area was by no means spared from the recession, the impacts weren’t as stark. All counties in the region recorded lower employment losses than Los Angeles, San Bernardino and Riverside counties. A third of the counties in the Bay Area fared better than San Diego and Orange counties.”

Doubling down

Critics have warned that undue reliance on the seaboard, and on Silicon Valley in particular, would have risky distorting effects on policymakers’ views and deeds. Setting aside Silicon Valley and the Bay Area, for instance, “the Golden State’s employment growth between 2009 and 2014 and real gross domestic product per capita between 2009 and 2013 each drop about 2 percentage points,” as the Hoover Institution’s Carson Bruno observed. “This is a 55 percent reduction in economic growth and a 25 percent cut in employment growth for California without this one region.”

Thanks to the region’s dominance, the Golden State’s budgeting has become increasingly captive to its tax base. “California’s budget is currently in a strong position because of a surge in tax collections, specifically personal income tax collections,” Bruno added. “Without the Silicon Valley-Bay Area, average assessed taxes per capita would have dropped $249 per year since the Great Recession ended or the equivalent of approximately $7.9 billion per year. That is the difference between budget surpluses and budget deficits.”

California’s coastal metropolises have proven especially exposed to the ups and downs of international markets — especially China, where a weakening economy has broken the state’s run of record-setting exports. “California shipments to China in the August-to-October period fell by 11.4 percent, from $4.19 billion last year to $3.71 billion in 2015,” the Sacramento Bee noted. “Shipments declined across the board, from computer equipment to agricultural products.”