What Does Maxine Waters Actually Do In Congress?

Maxine Waters announced at a speech recently she was “going to take out Trump”.  Even before Trump took office she was calling for his impeachment.  So, what are her accomplishments in over 27 years in Congress, aside from being a role model for the Klan in Tan”

“Today in Michigan, Waters led a raucous chorus at a women’s rally, chanting “Impeach 45! Impeach 45!” But, people would be wise to remember that her career is one of corruption and failure.

Rep. Waters has passed just three bills in her 27 years in Congress. That means on average, Waters produces something noteworthy for constituents every 9 years. One of the bills was renaming a Post Office. Impressive stuff.

In the interim, she is busy making money for her family and allies. Her family has accrued more than a million dollars during her time in the House, according to Red Alert Politics.

Water is not a serious person—she is begging for attention, not helping her constituents.  She is the black version of a 1964 George Wallace—a hater and a bigot, with no redeeming values.  I am too old to be subtle.

Congressional Black Caucus Holds Press Conference On Stimulus Bill

What Does Maxine Waters Actually Do In Congress?

Timothy Meads, Townhall.  10/28/17

Maxine Waters (D-CA) has rebranded herself in the Trump Era as a strong public servant standing up to the corrupt, demagogic president. Repeatedly, she has harangued the president during speeches that range from AIDS fundraisers to LGBT Gala award dinners.

Today in Michigan, Waters led a raucous chorus at a women’s rally, chanting “Impeach 45! Impeach 45!” But, people would be wise to remember that her career is one of corruption and failure.

Rep. Waters has passed just three bills in her 27 years in Congress. That means on average, Waters produces something noteworthy for constituents every 9 years. One of the bills was renaming a Post Office. Impressive stuff.

In the interim, she is busy making money for her family and allies. Her family has accrued more than a million dollars during her time in the House, according to Red Alert Politics.

Furthermore, the group Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington has given Rep. Waters the most corrupt member of congress four separate times. Waters’ shady financial dealings should concern all Americans. Democrats still have produced nothing that shows President Trump should be impeached, but financial kickbacks abound for liberal members of Congress like the “great stateswoman” Waters in a slew of various ways.

Rep. Waters spoke today at a Women’s March Convention focusing largely on sexual assault. This is an important issue to focus on, especially in light of the heinous Harvey Weinstein revelations. The crowd no doubt enjoyed having Rep. Waters present; one woman telling the Detroit Free Press that she was still shaking from the experience.

“I loved how she called Trump out and I loved how she encouraged women to speak out and led us in an ‘impeach’ chant,” she  said. “It was so powerful to hear thousands of women chant ‘impeach.’ I’m still shaking.”

But, to the women chanting along with “Auntie Maxine,” remember that aside from rhetorical posturing, she has done relatively little for you in nearly 30 years of public service.

The chant can be seen in a video below provided by the Detroit Free Press.

 

California Colleges Graduate LESS Qualified Math Teachers—By Design!

Think education is going to get better in California?  Our schools are using Common Core, where two plus two can equal five, if you understand the process.  Now there is a shortage of qualified teachers—instead of working to make more teachers qualified, they are changing the rules so LESS qualified people will teach math.

“To entice more students to become math teachers — and ease a chronic shortage in California classrooms —  four state universities  will offer preparation programs considerably shortening the time it takes to get a teaching credential.

Cal State Los Angeles, San Jose State, San Diego State and Fresno State have each received state grants of approximately $250,000 to create credential programs that allow future math teachers to earn a bachelor’s degree while simultaneously earning a single-subject math teaching credential.

Once the programs are underway,  students will be able to get a credential in four years, instead of the average of 5 1/2 years it currently takes.”

They are taking 37% off the time need to be a teacher.  Now, when you are asking about teachers you need to ask if they are truly qualified or just given the credential.  Government schools are failures—and they are making them worse.

classroom

In face of shortage, California colleges to shrink time to become a math teacher

EdSource, 10/29/17

To entice more students to become math teachers — and ease a chronic shortage in California classrooms —  four state universities  will offer preparation programs considerably shortening the time it takes to get a teaching credential.

Cal State Los Angeles, San Jose State, San Diego State and Fresno State have each received state grants of approximately $250,000 to create credential programs that allow future math teachers to earn a bachelor’s degree while simultaneously earning a single-subject math teaching credential.

Once the programs are underway,  students will be able to get a credential in four years, instead of the average of 5 1/2 years it currently takes,

Currently to get a teaching credential, most teachers must first earn a four year undergraduate degree, and then enroll in a post-graduate program that can take an additional one to two years.  The new programs will eliminate the post-graduate portion, and integrate it into a student’s undergraduate course of study.

The shift is expected to produce nearly 100 new math teachers annually and save students at least $7,000 in tuition costs, said Marquita Grenot-Scheyer, assistant vice chancellor of teacher education and public school programs at California State University. The first students are expected to begin the program in 2018-19.

Going Deeper

Gov. Brown’s push for more undergraduates to get teaching credentials, EdSource, May 19, 2016.

College campuses to receive $8 million to boost teacher prep programs, EdSource, Dec. 8, 2016.

Preparing World Class Teachers, EdSource, Oct. 2014

“This is going to significantly impact the teacher shortage in California,” Grenot-Scheyer said. “The investment in these programs will pay off not just for teacher candidates, but for students in California public schools.”

California is facing a shortfall of 33,000 new math and science teachers over the next decade, as science, technology, math and engineering (STEM) majors seek higher-paying jobs in the technology sector, older teachers retire and the demand for STEM education grows, according to California State University. A study by the Learning Policy Institute found that between 2011-12 and 2015-16, the number of fully credentialed new math teachers dropped by 36 percent, from 1,647 to 1,041,

As a result, more schools are hiring teachers without full credentials, or relying on substitutes to fill math classrooms. The number of temporary or emergency math credentials issued jumped more than 55 percent between 2011-12 and 2015-16, from 439 to 685, according to the Learning Policy Institute study.

To recruit math teachers, school districts have been offering incentives such as housing assistance, cash bonuses and student loan forgiveness. Using funds allotted by the state Legislature, the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing has been giving grants to colleges and universities to create four-year, combination bachelor’s and credential programs, but most of those programs have been for multiple-subject, bilingual or special education credentials.

The $250,000 grants are a result of funds that Gov. Jerry Brown included in the state budget last year. Schools will use the money to free up faculty members to write the new undergraduate curriculum, and to produce marketing materials to attract students.

At Cal State Los Angeles, the new program, called SCOPE, will cover all the required courses for math majors, and include teaching courses instead of electives. It will also include some online and summer classes, allowing students to complete all the requirements for both the math major and teaching credential in four years.

But organizers hope it’ll spark something more important: a passion for teaching math.

“Math is so important, and so many of today’s generation say they don’t like math. To go into a classroom and impart your love of math to students — that is a huge accomplishment,” said Debasree Raychaudhuri, a math professor at Cal State Los Angeles who’s helping organize the Scope program. “By teaching math you can make such a difference.”

Still, schools like Cal State Los Angeles face tough odds in producing more math teachers. Of the school’s 28,000 students, only about 200 are math majors, and of those, fewer than 25 percent intend to become math teachers. The rest plan to work in technology, banking, research or pursue advanced degrees, Raychaudhuri said. Systemwide, only 5,167 students were majoring in math in 2016, just over 1 percent of the system’s 424,309 undergraduates.

The same is true at San Jose State, one of the other schools to establish a new fast-track math teacher program. Of the school’s 150 math majors, only about 50 are planning to become teachers. But by easing the credential process, organizer Cheryl Roddick hopes more students will be inspired to forsake Silicon Valley for the classroom.

After all, there’s more to life than toiling in an office park, she said.

“A lot of people go to these high-tech jobs and come back to us, saying they don’t want to work in a cubicle forever. They want to meet people, make a difference, give back to their communities,” said Roddick, a math professor. “They want to become teachers.”

And they’ll have no trouble finding jobs, she said.

“I get emails regularly from school districts looking for math teachers,” she said. “All our graduates get snapped up right away.”

California State University has taken other steps, as well, to help solve the STEM teacher shortage, such as offering scholarships for future math and science teachers, providing research opportunities with established scientists, and streamlining the transfer process from community colleges.

 

Orange and L.A. county transportation agencies to offer own ride-sharing services

Great news—your tax dollars are going to create government owned competition to Uber and Lyft—while you go broke paying the taxes which provides the subsides for the money losing government transportation systems, government is using your money to kill off profit making companies.  That is how socialism works—using the people’s money to kill off private sector jobs.

“Public transit agencies in Los Angeles and Orange counties announced this week that they’re seeking private-sector partners to operate new door-to-door ride-sharing programs.

The proposed “micro-transit” programs would begin operating in selected areas this summer, offering cheaper door-to-door rides than Uber and Lyft — as low as $5 per trip with free transfers to buses and rail lines.

The service would be designed to boost ridership and to keep up with private-sector technology innovations, said Joshua Schank, chief innovation officer at Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, or LA Metro.”

Corruption and job killing has many effort in government—this is one of them.  Oh, the government workers will be FORCED to pay bribes to unions to work—another benefit for the Socialist project—government/unions own the workers.

uber

Orange and L.A. county transportation agencies to offer own ride-sharing services

 

By Sandy Mazza,| Daily Breeze, 10/25/17

Look out Uber and Lyft, more competition is on the way.

Public transit agencies in Los Angeles and Orange counties announced this week that they’re seeking private-sector partners to operate new door-to-door ride-sharing programs.

The proposed “micro-transit” programs would begin operating in selected areas this summer, offering cheaper door-to-door rides than Uber and Lyft — as low as $5 per trip with free transfers to buses and rail lines.

The service would be designed to boost ridership and to keep up with private-sector technology innovations, said Joshua Schank, chief innovation officer at Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority, or LA Metro.

“The idea behind this service is that there are many people who need better public transit in Los Angeles that we cannot adequately serve with our existing bus and rail network,” Schank said. “You’ll be able to summon a vehicle. It’ll pick you up at a point near where you are and transport you to a point near where you’re going.”

Similar to Lyft and Uber, the systems would be accessible through a cellphone app. But they won’t require that the user have a credit card, and they will accommodate disabled riders.

“If you’re an average person taking three buses in the morning, you might have to wait 10 to 20 minutes for each bus,” Schank said. “Now, you’ve got a point-to-point option, where the service is picking you up within 10 minutes.”

The Orange County Transportation Authority’s board of directors on Monday approved a request for proposals to seek companies to partner on its program, called OC Flex.

The OC Flex program is an extension of OCTA’s OC Bus 360 — an initiative designed to modernize the system and increase ridership. So far, it has included a cellphone app that allows mobile ticketing and summer student passes.

The OCTA decided to invest nearly $1.4 million in OC Flex’s yearlong pilot test. The system would begin operating in July in Huntington Beach, Aliso Viejo, Laguna Niguel, and Mission Viejo with wheelchair-accessible vans.

TransLoc software will coordinate rides, navigate routes, and accept payments. But riders also can reserve rides and pay for them via phone. All rides will be shared, and riders will be picked up and dropped off at locations near to their homes and destinations.

“This effort will aim to improve bus ridership while meeting the changing mobility demands,” an OCTA report states. “The service should have a wait time of 15 minutes or less and cost about $5 per trip in order to attract the largest possible market.”

 

Is a Hollywood Tax Credit Still Needed to Protect Industry Jobs?

Should the people of California have given millions to Harvey Weinstein to abuse women in California, while making movies as well?  Should Netflix be given your tax dollars in hopes that Kevin Spacey will not be a sexual predator, to those UNDER 18?  Should your tax dollars go to hate America, hate white people, abuse women and end the Constitution values of Hollywood?

“The facility has been heralded as a successful product of California’s expanded film tax credit program, signed by Governor Jerry Brown in 2014. The initiative aims to expand production to all corners of the state and to protect an industry at risk of losing film jobs to other countries and states.

But as many competing programs have come up short in their goal of creating sustained film production, it seems that the threat of new Tinseltowns sprouting up across the country has diminished.

Speaking in front of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce in August, Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon said the film tax credit investment “is paying off” as other states reduce their incentive programs.

Is it the role of government to finance one industry to the detriment of the values and fiscal needs of the rest of the State and businesses?  Oh, do not forget, Hollywood provides the star power for campaign events and is a major source of donations—in other words this is a payoff, not a need of the people.

Hollywood-Sign

Is a Hollywood Tax Credit Still Needed to Protect Industry Jobs?

By Guy Marzorati, KQED,  10/30/17

Posters in the hallway announce upcoming club meetings and homecoming events. Placards next to lockers note yearly academic achievements. In a nearby basketball gym, banners hang from the ceiling to celebrate the Liberty High Tigers’ past championships.

But you won’t find any students at this meticulously detailed production set, constructed inside a former Navy recreation center on Mare Island in the Bay Area city of Vallejo.

Fields and buildings abandoned by the Navy in 1996 have been transformed into Film Mare Island, a production facility which hosted the soon-to-be-released second season of “13 Reasons Why,” the controversial Netflix show about a teen’s suicide.

The facility has been heralded as a successful product of California’s expanded film tax credit program, signed by Governor Jerry Brown in 2014. The initiative aims to expand production to all corners of the state and to protect an industry at risk of losing film jobs to other countries and states.

But as many competing programs have come up short in their goal of creating sustained film production, it seems that the threat of new Tinseltowns sprouting up across the country has diminished.

Speaking in front of the Hollywood Chamber of Commerce in August, Senate President Pro Tem Kevin de Leon said the film tax credit investment “is paying off” as other states reduce their incentive programs.

“With the sheer scale of our commitment to the industry, we’re out-competing states like Florida and North Carolina,” he said. “Both states have dropped their programs after we overhauled ours here in California.”

The extension and expansion of California’s film and TV tax credit was chaptered in Assembly Bill 1839, which grew the program from $100 million to $330 million annually through 2020.

Proponents argued that the legislation, which received bipartisan support, would stem the tide of thousands of film production jobs leaving the state every year.

“The film and TV industry is an indigenous kind of industry, especially in Southern California,” said Assemblyman Raul Bocanegra, D-Pacoima, who helped write the tax credit bill. “We were losing our lunch to other places in the country and the world for filming.”

The solution offers greater incentives to production companies than the original film tax credit program did and changed a number of features of the earlier program.

A budget cap that excluded blockbuster films from receiving credits was eliminated, and the process of selecting films to receive credits was changed from a random lottery to a formula that aims to choose productions most likely to deliver jobs.

Films and TV shows can receive a tax credit covering 20 percent of expenses with added incentives for shows relocating to California. The qualified expenses include wages for cameramen and crew, and money spent on equipment, but not the salaries of actors or directors.

Without the tax credit, the money given back to film studios would go to the state’s general fund to help pay for programs like public education and Medi-Cal.

The direct benefits of the program can be challenging to track.

Brian Weatherford, a fiscal and policy analyst with the Legislative Analyst’s Office, says a study of the first film incentive program found that many productions that missed out on a tax credit in California ended up relocating to another state or country.

But the circumstances for each project are so unique that researchers found it impossible to simulate what would have happened to the industry if no tax breaks were given.

“We found that there was some justification to consider having [the tax credits] because of this very aggressive competition from other states,” Weatherford said, “but we have no way of knowing what the alternative is.”

Backers of the program say it’s delivered on its goal of providing a shot in the arm to one of California’s signature industries.

A recent report from the California Film Commission concluded that during the program’s first two years, the state “attracted or retained” 100 projects, which created an estimated $3.7 billion of spending.

“We’re definitely seeing a resurgence in the level of production all over the state,” said Amy Lemisch, executive director of the California Film Commission. “Our soundstage facilities are pretty much operating at capacity.”

Legislators behind the expansion also tout an extra five percent credit given to projects filming outside of the 30-mile zone around Los Angeles.

Among the projects taking advantage of the bonus tax credit is “13 Reasons Why,” which this summer filmed its second season in the Bay Area.

“It is the catalyst for why we’re here today,” said Mark Walter, general manager of Film Mare Island, where the Netflix show and an additional feature film are being shot. “We would not be here if it wasn’t for that added incentive.”

As he zips between soundstages and design studios in his golf cart, Walter points to the network of lumber yards, catering companies and hotels that benefit from a production coming to town.

The California Film Commission report found that during the production of the first season of “13 Reasons Why,” nearly $22 million was spent in Contra Costa, Marin, Solano and Sonoma counties.

“The bill is doing what it was intended to do,” said Assemblyman Bocanegra. “Keep as many jobs as we can in California and to spread it around. Not just in Southern California but throughout the state.”

The question that will face lawmakers when the current tax credit program expires in 2020 is whether California’s well-established film infrastructure still needs help to stave off competition.

“In an ideal world, we’d be competing on how good our soundstages are,” said the Legislative Analyst’s Office’s Weatherford. “Not because our government is giving away money.”

Increasingly, other states are deciding that the tax credits are a race to the bottom.

A study by University of Southern California Assistant Professor Michael Thom found that 11 of the 45 states that once offered film tax credits have ended their programs.

Others, like Louisiana, have scaled back investments after seeing little growth in jobs and productions.

“It did not help states attract larger shares of the industry,” Thom said. “In the long term, most of Hollywood stayed in Hollywood.”

California and New York’s inherent advantages (scenery; an established pool of actors, directors and writers; proximity to existing studios) were apparently too difficult to overcome, save for picking off an occasional big-name feature.

As California’s current film tax credit nears its midway point, lawmakers will consider an expansion amid a field of fewer competitors.

“It’s sort of bizarre to watch California spend more money to retain jobs that there’s no real incentive to leave the state,” Thom said.

Senate President Pro Tem de Leon said he’ll consider possible changes to the program, but he doesn’t want to take any chances in letting the incentives expire.

“We have to extend it, and we have to send the signal that we’re in this for the long haul,” de Leon said. “We’re not out of the woods.”

It may simply prove more politically costly to ditch the tax credits, which de Leon said many businesses view as “catnip.” That metaphor was echoed in Thom’s research at USC, which found that the more a state invested in film tax credits, the less likely they were to scale back the incentive.

Once the investment is made and the industry becomes used to the benefit, “it’s very hard to overcome,” Thom said.

California clears first hurdle to breaking into three states

You might find on the November 2018 ballot a measure to break California into three States.  A rich denizen of the Silicon Valley has come back with yet another ballot effort to try to legitimize the corruption, bigotry and fiscal irresponsibility of Sacramento, by creating three new States.

“The plan proposes making the area including and north of San Francisco into one state, a coastal region extending south to Los Angeles another state, and everywhere south and east of those a third state.

If approved by residents, Congress would have the final say on the matter.”

Seriously—no one from the Right or Left is happy about Sacramento.  Maybe if the discontent is pushed, we might have a revolution—and that is what it will take to make California legitimate again.  What do you think?

california-debt

California clears first hurdle to breaking into three states

by Anna Giaritelli, Washington Examiner,  10/29/17

 

 

California has cleared its first hurdle to going from one state to three smaller states.

Golden State residents who support billionaire Tim Draper’s initiative to break the state into smaller parts will now begin collecting signatures to get the plan on next year’s election ballot.

The plan proposes making the area including and north of San Francisco into one state, a coastal region extending south to Los Angeles another state, and everywhere south and east of those a third state.

If approved by residents, Congress would have the final say on the matter.

Draper previously pushed for a similar proposal in 2014, but the plan failed. He has said this new push would give residents three smaller forms of government.

 

How our country lost its heart and soul — the people

The voice of the people is not the voice of Washington, Sacramento, the mainstream media, the NFL, the campuses of America or the denizens of Hollywood.  Without Donald Trump, real people would not have a voice in government or the culture.  Sad turn of events.  When I hear the cry “Drain the Swamp” I think Trump gets it wrong, it is not a Swamp that needs to be drained, it is a gigantic ocean—of hate, bigotry, greed, corruption and hypocrisy.

“About halfway through Cruz’s speech, one of the reporters sneezed. Out of courtesy and habit I said, “God bless you.” I instantly felt a chill in the room as everyone looked toward what seemed to be my direction. I looked behind me to see if something terrible had happened. It was clear that nothing had.

A few minutes later, after Cruz was done speaking, an aide to one of the candidates, whispered to me, “We don’t say that around here.”

I wasn’t sure what he meant, so I asked what was the “that” that we don’t say around here?

His answer: Blessing someone after they sneeze.

While the young man was perfectly pleasant, it was clear I was being scolded.

The obnoxious, arrogant media, professors and folks in Washington really think the people are beneath them.  It is time to drain the Ocean.

Charlotte, NC - September 18, 2016: San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) walks off the field at Bank of America Stadium with his fist up in the air after their game against the Panthers.(Gerry Melendez for ESPN)

How our country lost its heart and soul — the people

By Salena Zito, NY Post,  10/28/17

In March of 2015, I was working for a local newspaper in Pittsburgh covering national politics, when I went to attend a meeting of the international firefighters union at a hotel in Washington, DC.

It was one of the first big events for that campaign cycle and featured Bernie Sanders; Republican Sens. Ted Cruz, Marco Rubio and Lindsey Graham; and former Virginia Democratic Sen. Jim Webb.

Donald Trump had not declared he was running at that point.

The press area, located behind the last row of the attendees, was filled with premier reporters from prestigious publications and news networks, and me.

At the time I was one of the few reporters left who covered national elections for a local newspaper.

There was a fraternity of connection among the big-city journalists. They traveled together, socialized together at cocktail parties and shared the same cultural touch-tones.

I, on the other hand, was from the Paris of Appalachia.

About halfway through Cruz’s speech, one of the reporters sneezed. Out of courtesy and habit I said, “God bless you.” I instantly felt a chill in the room as everyone looked toward what seemed to be my direction. I looked behind me to see if something terrible had happened. It was clear that nothing had.

A few minutes later, after Cruz was done speaking, an aide to one of the candidates, whispered to me, “We don’t say that around here.”

I wasn’t sure what he meant, so I asked what was the “that” that we don’t say around here?

His answer: Blessing someone after they sneeze.

While the young man was perfectly pleasant, it was clear I was being scolded.

Why do I tell this story? Because this country is in the ascent of a populism both political and cultural — and when you are in the tempest of a movement, even the slightest thing can be blown up into an incident of large consequences.

To understand how we navigate through populism begins with understanding how we got here.

Populism is being invested in the concerns of “ordinary” people. But it can also be a sweeping rejection of all things big — institutions like government, or cultural entities like the NFL. And it can be a strong desire to be part of something bigger than ourselves, which is a distinctive American trait (especially given the diversity of our backgrounds and how parochial we can be about where we are from).

Hollywood has been mocking Middle America for 20 years; every awards show is a debutante ball of shame and scold directed at half of the country

I would argue that it is one of the things that was missed in the last presidential election, when the political class understood it to be that everyone who voted for Donald Trump was angry. But that was only a fraction of the situation.

In that sweeping diagnosis, they missed that the majority of his voters were inspired by his aspirational message, Make America Great Again.

I’m With Her? Not so much.

At the core of all of this is the sense that Americans don’t feel that they are part of each other because of the division via politics and culture — they don’t trust anyone to be authentic and sincere anymore.

Furthermore, most of the decision-and image-makers in this country — in culture, politics and power — live in the 10 wealthiest counties in the country.

While we have long been a country of city mice and country mice, the balance of power and influence between the two areas has never been this lopsided.

New York has always been the center of wealth; Washington, its own brand of power. But the heartland was where things were made; steel, iron, energy, lumber — which meant cars, buildings, bridges, homes. Not to mention the fuel needed to make all those things for everyone.

We were better at navigating our contributions because they were all equally important to our country. We were all part of something bigger than ourselves.

So how do we rehabilitate this decline in America’s trust in institutions when opportunities continue to diminish rather than grow? There is no easy single answer.

Our faith, trust and connection with essential parts of our society is in collapse — it is a problem that is complicated and crosses all segments of society. And it was completely unavoidable.

The more technological advances we’ve achieved, the more we have placed society in a position that has subverted our institutions’ relationship with people.

In other words: To win elections or to encourage American to purchase something, industry leaders are promising either that good jobs are coming back or that you’ll feel better when you use a certain product.

The truth is, jobs aren’t coming back, because that feel-good company is creating automation that will eliminate a lot of the jobs of the people who work in your community by the next presidential election.

And then there are the institutional fissures in our communities. How safe is our water? Is that bridge I cross everyday structurally sound? How prepared is my town for a natural disaster? Why are our school systems failing our children? Why have so very few in the Catholic Church faced crime and punishment for their actions? Why do CEOs get paid so much money while their workers lose their jobs? Why do banks get bailouts but we don’t?

People also feel destabilized, uncertain and disillusioned by everything that was supposed to lift us up, like entertainment and sports. Hollywood has been mocking Middle America for 20 years; every awards show is a debutante ball of shame and scold directed at half of the country.

That they have done this behind smiling masks while hiding the open secret of debauched treatment of women is repulsive.

Sports — football, in particular — was the last remaining force that crosses the cultural divide but has now been forever damaged.

Rebuilding trust should most likely begin at the most local level: in neighborhood banks, at local businesses and with reporters who live in our communities — interactions whose authority Americans can trust to be fair, removed from coastal or cosmopolitan biases.

Trust at the peer-to-peer level can help repair our divide; it does not mean that, if you feel strongly that police reform is needed, you avoid the issues. But instead of making a big social media statement, why not make a difference through civic involvement, volunteering and serving the community on the issue?

People often say to me we live in the worst time ever. My response is always the same: “You clearly have never heard of the ’60s in either century of our country’s existence.”

It may feel as though we are heading off of a cliff. We’re not.

The good thing about populism is that it is exhausting. Historically, it rarely lasts longer than two election cycles. So while we are nowhere near the end yet, if we remain true to ourselves, we can navigate through this without too many battle scars.

 

Church Founded by George Washington Throws Him Out! Not a Joke

The Episcopal Church has decided, as policy, to wipe out history.  This failing Church, for instance, “The decrease is part of a trend that has seen membership decline by just more than 16 percent since 2000.

Membership in the Episcopal Church in 2010 was 2,125,012, with 1,951,907 in its domestic dioceses and 173,105 in the non-domestic dioceses, according to a report here. Membership in the church’s domestic dioceses in 2009 was 2,006,343, showing a decrease of 54,436 in 2010.”

Now they have declared the history and ghost of George Washington has to be excised from the Church he founded and attended for more than twenty years.

“George Washington was one of the founding members of Christ Church in Alexandria, buying pew No. 5 when the church first opened in 1773, and attending for more than two decades.

This week the church announced it was pulling down a memorial to its one-time vestryman and the country’s first president, saying he and another famous parishioner, Robert E. Lee, have become too controversial and are chasing away would-be parishioners.

While acknowledging “friction” over the decision, the church’s leadership said the twin memorials, which are attached to the wall on either side of the altar, are relics of another era and have no business in a church that proclaims its motto as “All are welcome — no exceptions.”

This is a church that does not live its own values and theology.  Great church for haters, bigots and hypocrites—maybe Harvey Weinstein and his enablers should start attending.

Gateway_Church_NRH

How Churches Die

Steven Hayward, Powerline Blog,  10/28/17

There’s a saying attributed variously to Robert Conquest or John O’Sullivan that “any institution that is not explicitly right-wing will become left-wing over time.” A good case in point is the Episcopal Church, which was once known as “the Republican Party at prayer,” but which has for the last several decades fallen in line behind every politically correct enthusiasm of the left.

We imagine the conversation in the Episcopal clergy must go something like this:

Bishop: Father Smith, I see that a few parishioners are still showing up for the liturgy on Sundays. Isn’t there something else we can do about this to drive the remaining people away?

Father Smith: Well, I suppose we could double down on the “Star Trek” prayer and use it in every Sunday service until everyone stops coming: “At your command all things came to be: the vast expanse of interstellar space, galaxies, suns, the planets in their courses, and this fragile earth, our island home.”*

Bishop: Not sure that will do the trick. ‘The Force’ is great and all, but ironically it just might be too close to the Holy Spirit to be effective.

Father Smith: That’s Star WARS, your excellence, not Star TREK.

Bishop: Well whatever. In either case, their General Conventions are way more intelligent than ours.

Father Smith: I’ve got it! Let’s throw out the honors for George Washington in his old parish in Alexandria!

Bishop: Genius! What didn’t we think of this before?

[*Actual words of Rite II, Eucharistic Prayer C.]

News item:

George Washington’s church to tear down memorial honoring first president

By Stephen Dinan

George Washington was one of the founding members of Christ Church in Alexandria, buying pew No. 5 when the church first opened in 1773, and attending for more than two decades.

This week the church announced it was pulling down a memorial to its one-time vestryman and the country’s first president, saying he and another famous parishioner, Robert E. Lee, have become too controversial and are chasing away would-be parishioners.

While acknowledging “friction” over the decision, the church’s leadership said the twin memorials, which are attached to the wall on either side of the altar, are relics of another era and have no business in a church that proclaims its motto as “All are welcome — no exceptions.”

“The plaques in our sanctuary make some in our presence feel unsafe or unwelcome. Some visitors and guests who worship with us choose not to return because they receive an unintended message from the prominent presence of the plaques,” the church leaders said.

Nitwits.

Chaser:

It is now no more that toleration is spoken of as if it were the indulgence of one class of people that another enjoyed the exercise of their inherent natural rights, for, happily, the Government of the United States, which gives to bigotry no sanction, to persecution no assistance, requires only that they who live under its protection should demean themselves as good citizens in giving it on all occasions their effectual support.

—President George Washington, Letter to the Hebrew Congregation at Newport, August 21, 1790. Unfortunately this understanding is nowadays lost on the leadership of the Episcopal Church (among many others).

 

Ugly Political Hypocrisy In California

California claims it is in love with children—but the ruling Party prefers aborting them.

Democrats claim they love quality education—but demand only union bribe payers teach, in failed schools.

We are told that California is safe—yet the Hollywood crowd has been exposed as sexual predators, pedophiles and worse.  Sacramento, where laws are made—they are made by sexual predators and haters of women.

Hypocrisy?  Thy name is California.

“Sacramento, where self-proclaimed “progressive” politicians talk about educational opportunity and fairness but block financial and teacher quality reforms in order to please big and powerful political interests. In doing so, they condemn poor and minority urban children to classrooms drained of resources by unfunded pension payments and constrained by rules that grant lifetime employment regardless of performance, deny principals the ability to place the finest teachers in those classrooms, and place the worst teachers in the poorest districts. Meanwhile, the well-off or well-connected — many of whom in deep blue California also proclaim themselves to be “progressive” — avoid the consequences by sending their kids to private schools or living in suburbs or neighborhoods in which they subsidize their public schools.

Progressives who don’t walk their talk.”

Are the children of the Kardashians, Matt Damon, Sean Penn, Harvey Werinstein in government schools?  Yet they all want You to send your child to failed LAUSD or your local union run school.  Hypocrisy—send Jimmie Kimmels children to LAUSD!

California-budget-crisis-bear-flag

Ugly Political Hypocrisy In California

Something is rotten in Sacramento.

David Crane, Medium, 10/28/17

The recent release of Ken Burns’s Vietnam documentary transported me back to the politics of my youth and the ugly hypocrisy of Lyndon Johnson, whose story contains a critical lesson for California today.

It’s no secret that Johnson lied about events in the Gulf of Tonkin and about progress in the Vietnam War as he escalated American involvement to 500,000 troops and prosecuted the war with poor judgments that contributed to the deaths of 30,000 Americans during his presidency and countless more Vietnamese. Less well known is that Johnson — who courageously led the Civil Rights and Voting Rights Acts — discriminated against American minorities and the poor by allowing certain young men to avoid his war through college deferments. Those deferments disproportionately benefited the well-off or well-connected, who were also disproportionately white. I’ve long wondered if LBJ comprehended the hypocrisy —ie, a fighter for civil rights who authorized discrimination — expressed by his actions.

Similar political hypocrisy is on display today in California’s capital city, Sacramento, where self-proclaimed “progressive” politicians talk about educational opportunity and fairness but block financial and teacher quality reforms in order to please big and powerful political interests. In doing so, they condemn poor and minority urban children to classrooms drained of resources by unfunded pension payments and constrained by rules that grant lifetime employment regardless of performance, deny principals the ability to place the finest teachers in those classrooms, and place the worst teachers in the poorest districts. Meanwhile, the well-off or well-connected — many of whom in deep blue California also proclaim themselves to be “progressive” — avoid the consequences by sending their kids to private schools or living in suburbs or neighborhoods in which they subsidize their public schools.

Progressives who don’t walk their talk.

Though not potentially fatal to lives as was Vietnam, California’s educational discrimination is potentially fatal to the dreams of students who will have little chance in a competitive world without high quality educations. Look no further than to my city of San Francisco, home of the most progressive talk in the country. As two recent reports (see * below) about the sad state of performance by poor African-American and Latino school children make clear, when it comes to education San Francisco doesn’t walk its progressive talk. Likewise, blockage of pension reforms in the state capitol by self-proclaimed progressives has financially handcuffed the San Francisco Unified School District so much that this year only 29 percent of its budget is available for certificated teacher salaries.

I have the greatest admiration for LBJ’s work on civil rights — and the greatest disgust for his lies and the de facto discrimination he authorized when drafting troops for Vietnam. My feelings are the same about California politicians who with their words oppose discrimination but with their actions contribute to discrimination in education. By blocking reforms that would allow more tax revenues to reach classrooms, enable the hiring of more teachers and better pay for those teachers, and empower principals to ensure highly qualified teachers and specialists in each classroom, they are doing the work of the devil.

I’ve often wished California’s constitution required governors to send their children to urban public schools.

Neither Johnson nor Richard Nixon had children at risk to being sent to Vietnam. It’s hard not to think that didn’t have an impact on their willingness to risk others’ lives for a dubious and poorly executed cause. Likewise, it’s hard not to think that a California governor without kids in urban public schools understands the consequences of their actions. For example, with the approval of just 62 legislators Governor Brown could amend the Education Code to revise the tenure system and make it easier for principals to dismiss poorly performing teachers. But he hasn’t requested that approval. Instead, he took the opposite path by joining former State Attorney General Kamala Harris and teachers’ unions in resisting a lawsuit brought by poor and minority students in Los Angeles to do just that. Something is rotten when that happens.

Also rotten is that state leaders tell citizens that schools have meaningful local controls when they know that’s not true. They know school districts can not materially change rules relating to tenure, teacher dismissal or pensions without the approval of the governor and legislature. So they pin school districts into a Kafka-esque corner, using their powerful bullhorns to tell citizens they’ve granted power to local schools while knowing full well that all the power that matters still resides with them in Sacramento.

Political philanthropists must hold CA’s leaders accountable.

For now we can’t force California’s leaders to send their kids to urban public schools but at least political philanthropists and voters can hold them accountable. California’s politicians must walk their talk. They should free up school districts to empower principals, reduce tenure rights, fire bad teachers and modify pension arrangements. And they should tell constituents the truth. Now.

*A Dream Deferred: How San Francisco schools leave behind the most vulnerable students; https://reports.innovateschools.org/san-francisco-schools-report-2017-home/

Why is San Francisco the state’s worst county for black student achievement? https://calmatters.org/articles/san-francisco-states-worst-county-black-student-achievement/

 

Bullet Train Tunnels a Deeper Hole for Taxpayers

We found out a few days ago that Guv Brown had yet another multi-billion scam–$85 billion to speed the trip from Oakland to Sacramento for the Amtrak train.  For that money you might save 20 minutes—and your great-great-great-grandchildren will still be paying for this payoff to unions and crony capitalist.  We know the choo choo to nowhere is a $200 billion scam—and the number are beginning to show.

“As Ralph Vartabedian reports in the Los Angeles Times, according to current plans, “a crucial part of the journey will be a 13.5-mile tunnel beneath the winding peaks and valleys of Pacheco Pass,” which will be “the nation’s longest and most advanced transportation tunnel.” Trouble is, the best tunnel experts peg the cost at “anywhere from $5.6 billion to $14.4 billion,” and the route “also requires a 1.5-mile tunnel just east of Gilroy, itself a major infrastructure project.” As UC Berkeley civil engineer William Ibbs told Vartabedian, “This is not good news for taxpayers of California.” That also applies to the entire project.

They literally have no idea as to the costs—the plan is to build and tax—starting in 2020, two years from now, your gas tax goes up 73 cents to finance this scam.  The High Speed Rail Authority makes Bernie Madoff look competent in the handling of money.

Money

Bullet Train Tunnels a Deeper Hole for Taxpayers

by K. Lloyd Billingsley, MyGovCost,  10/29/17

Two years ago, as we noted, California’s high-speed rail project was facing 36 miles of tunnels through the mountains north of Los Angeles, a tectonically complex area abounding in earthquake faults. As independent experts observed, these tunnels would have been the most ambitious tunneling project in U.S. history, with 90% odds of massive cost overruns. Bullet train bosses claimed they had not yet picked the exact route through the mountains, and the project was behind schedule on land acquisition, financing, permit approvals, and still facing multiple lawsuits. None of that diminished the rail bosses’ tunnel vision.

As Ralph Vartabedian reports in the Los Angeles Times, according to current plans, “a crucial part of the journey will be a 13.5-mile tunnel beneath the winding peaks and valleys of Pacheco Pass,” which will be “the nation’s longest and most advanced transportation tunnel.” Trouble is, the best tunnel experts peg the cost at “anywhere from $5.6 billion to $14.4 billion,” and the route “also requires a 1.5-mile tunnel just east of Gilroy, itself a major infrastructure project.” As UC Berkeley civil engineer William Ibbs told Vartabedian, “This is not good news for taxpayers of California.” That also applies to the entire project.

As California’s state auditor has noted, the rail project has been handing out sweetheart no-bid contracts. The rail “Authority,” has no building experience but has already established four offices, a Sacramento headquarters and three regional offices. The bureaucratic structure provides a soft ride for ruling-class retreads such as Lynn Schenk, former congresswoman and chief of staff for governor Gray Davis. The project also runs roughshod over property rights. As Hedley Lamarr said in Blazing Saddles, one thing stands between the rail authority and the land they want: “the rightful owners.”

Last year Lawrence McQuillan gave the bullet train the Golden Fleece Award for the government program “guilty of egregiously fleecing taxpayers.” And this is all before a single rider ever stepped aboard. If it ever was built, the $98 billion rail project would still be slower and more expensive than air travel. On the other hand, the bullet train is not really about transportation.

It’s a hereditary project for governor Jerry Brown and a great way for government to spend money without providing value for taxpayers. As High-Speed Rail Authority, chief engineer Scott Jarvis explained about the $14.4 billion Pacheco Pass tunnel: “We don’t see any problem.”

 

Democrat National Committee OPENLY Refuses to Hire White IT Workers

We know that the Democrat party started the Ku Klux Klan.  We know the Democrat Party supports the genocide promoting Planned Parenthood.  Now we find that if you are a qualified straight white male, you can not be hired to work in the IT Department of this racist political party.

“The Democratic National Committee is hiring for some new positions in their Technology Team, including Chief Security Officer, IT Systems Administrator, and Product Manager. In the email soliciting job applications, it says that the DNC is looking for a “staff of diverse voices and life experiences.”

Unfortunately, according to the DNC’s Data Service Manager Madeleine Leader, this desire for “diverse voices and life experiences” apparently doesn’t extend to “cisgender straight white males.” In the closing paragraph of the email, Leader said “I personally would prefer that you not forward to cisgender straight white males, as they are already in the majority.”

Will the Attorney General open an investigation of this blatant act of discrimination?  The slogan of the new Democrat Party: “If you are white, you are NOT right—for the job”.

Democrat Donkey

DNC Email: Straight White Men Need Not Apply

Christine Rousselle, Townhall,  10/30/17

 

The Democratic National Committee is hiring for some new positions in their Technology Team, including Chief Security Officer, IT Systems Administrator, and Product Manager. In the email soliciting job applications, it says that the DNC is looking for a “staff of diverse voices and life experiences.”

Unfortunately, according to the DNC’s Data Service Manager Madeleine Leader, this desire for “diverse voices and life experiences” apparently doesn’t extend to “cisgender straight white males.” In the closing paragraph of the email, Leader said “I personally would prefer that you not forward to cisgender straight white males, as they are already in the majority.”

Yup.

Elliott Hamilton from the Daily Wire posted a screenshot of the email on Twitter, saying that this is another symptom of the “patently absurd oppression Olympics.”

(“Cisgender” is a term meaning someone who identifies as the gender assigned to them at birth, i.e. someone who is not transgender.)

First off, kudos to the DNC for recognizing that their technology department probably needed an upgrade, so that’s at least a positive step. But second–was it really necessary to straight-up single out a group of people who shouldn’t apply? If the best candidate for the job is a straight white male, they should hire the straight white male. His hypothetical “life experiences” aren’t any less valuable due to his sexuality or skin tone and could certainly contribute to a diverse workplace.

Anyhow, for what it’s worth, saying this is potentially a violation of the DNC’s own policies.