UC-Davis offers ‘FREE power nap class’/25 on Campus Locations to NAP

As we start the New Year, you should know how the UC system spends your money—using its assets—your assets—t put students to sleep, learning the “art” of the nap.  Isn’t that what was taught in kindergarten?  Seriously, do we need to know how to go to sleep and have taxpayers re-train us in the custom?

“The University of California-Davis offers a “FREE power nap class” where “trained instructors” teach students strategies to help them avoid falling asleep in class.

The class is offered thrice-weekly throughout the school year at 25 locations, depicted on an online map, where students can take their power nap in and on everything—ranging from outdoor hammocks to yoga mats in a dance studio.

“Yes, it is exactly what you think it is!”

“Yes, it is exactly what you think it is! Have you ever wanted to take a nap, but were afraid of sleeping through a class or midterm?” the course description reads. “Well, come to one of our guided power nap classes, where that will not need to be a worry for you.”

When Janet Napolitano says she needs more buildings, maybe the nap rooms could be used instead of building new facilities.

This is how the rest of the year is going to be.  The California Political News and Views will expose the corruption, government waste, government promoted and accepted hatred/bigotry and abuse of the Law.  2018 is going to be a great year.  Tell your friends to get their own free subscription!

HAPPY NEW YEAR–NOW I WILL TAKE MY NAP.

http://www.dreamstime.com/-image526791

UC-Davis offers ‘FREE power nap class’

Kyle Perisic, Campus Reform,  12/29/17

 
  • The University of California-Davis is offering a free power nap class being taught by “trained professionals.”
  • The campus has 25 locations where students can take a 20-minute nap on hammocks outside or on yoga mats in a dance studio to prevent students from sleeping in class.

 

The University of California-Davis offers a “FREE power nap class” where “trained instructors” teach students strategies to help them avoid falling asleep in class.

The class is offered thrice-weekly throughout the school year at 25 locations, depicted on an online map, where students can take their power nap in and on everything—ranging from outdoor hammocks to yoga mats in a dance studio.

“Yes, it is exactly what you think it is!”

“Yes, it is exactly what you think it is! Have you ever wanted to take a nap, but were afraid of sleeping through a class or midterm?” the course description reads. “Well, come to one of our guided power nap classes, where that will not need to be a worry for you.”

For the first five minutes, “trained instructors” lead students by settling them in and calming them down, followed by a 20-minute power nap that ends with a “gentle wake-up call.”

“For some reason, there is a culture on campus that, in order to be academically successful, our wellness needs to go out the door,” Brian Luu, who teaches the Power Nap class, told The Sacramento Bee.

“I’m very appreciative that I can sit here today and…relax,” adding that she doesn’t like to nap in public,” sophomore Valerie Ramos told The Bee.

“It’s because of a lot of anxiety that I have,” she continued. “I had to study for an organic chemistry class this morning, so I was up late last night. I definitely put my grades before my own well-being.”

The course has no final exam and is offered three days a week.

“So, if you’re tired, or you just want a little refresher, come as you are and get a little snooze in!” the course description says.

A university spokesperson told Campus Reform that while the nap class has yet to be added to the school calendar for next year, it will continue to be offered.

 

Al Gore—Scam Artist—Making Millions $$ From Scare tactics–North Pole has Melted!!

Paul Erhlich in the 1970’s said that by 200 the world would be in famine and ward s fought over food.  He lied, but made millions on his scare tactics scam.  Al Gore has done the same—claiming that the California coast would have ocean water TWO miles into the cities.  Not only did he lie about that, but he spent $9 million on a home a couple of blocks from the beach—near Oprah Winfrey, in Montecito in Santa Barbara County—a house bought based on a scam.  Now we have this from the scam master of America:

“Former Vice President Al Gore references computer modeling to suggest that the north polar ice cap may lose virtually all of its ice within the next seven years. “Some of the models suggest that there is a 75 percent chance that the entire north polar ice cap, during some of the summer months, could be completely ice-free within the next five to seven years,” says Gore.”

This scam quote was made in 2008—could we sue him to get our tax dollars back for money spent on his predictions’?

220px-Al_Gore

NINE YEARS AGO… Al Gore Predicted North Pole Would Be Completely Ice Free by Today

by Jim Hoft, Gateway Pundit,  12/28/17

NINE YEARS AGO THIS MONTH—
Al Gore predicted the North Polar Ice Cap would be completely ice free in five years.

Gore made the prediction to a German audience in 2008. He told them that “the entire North ‘polarized’ cap will disappear in 5 years.”

“Five Years”

This wasn’t the only time Gore made his ice-free prediction. Gore’s been predicting this since 2007.

According to Al Gore the North Pole should be completely melted by now.

Junk scientist Al Gore also made the same prediction in 2009.
From the video:

Article Continues Below

In January 2006, Al Gore posited “within the next 10 years, the world will reach a point of no return” and “a true planetary emergency” due to global warming.

Of course, this turned out to be nothing more than complete lunacy.

 

Six Insane California Laws That Go Into Effect Monday

Today is not a good day for freedom n California.  Numerous laws are effective today, taking away rights, causing higher cost of living and further make it difficult to be protected from criminals—both Native born and those here illegally from other countries.  Worse, even if you know about an illegal alien—if you are a landlord, you are not allowed to obey Federal law.  Seriously, think anyone will be prosecuted for obeying the law?

  1. The entire state will now ignore U.S. immigration law: Because it’s worked so well in San Francisco, California Democrats decided that the entire state should ignore federal immigration law. SB 54 forbids law enforcement officials from asking someone’s immigration or holding them for Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agents — unless they’ve been convicted of a crime. AB 291 prohibits landlords (you know, like, private citizens who own private property) from reporting renters who are in the US illegally.
  1. The DMV is raising vehicle registration fees: This is a minor blip in California’s war on cars, but it’s a frustrating one, because, really, this is the only thing that could make the DMV experience even worse. SB 1 increases vehicle registration fees between $25 and $175, depending on the vehicle’s value.”

I bet there is no way that you can go through today without breaking some California law—knowingly or unknowingly.  But, if you want to break the law it is easy—report an illegal alien to ICE—how about the two criminals Brown gave a pardon to, trying to keep them in this country?

Secure Choice Jerry Brown

Six Insane California Laws That Go Into Effect Monday

 

By Jared Sichel, Daily Wire,  12/29/17

For most Americans, the first moments of the new year are ones of celebration and excitement.

In California, it’s also a time to take stock of which new laws from the Democrat-controlled Legislature will make our lives just a little (or a lot) more frustrating. Here are six:

  1. The entire state will now ignore U.S. immigration law: Because it’s worked so well in San Francisco, California Democrats decided that the entire state should ignore federal immigration law. SB 54 forbids law enforcement officials from asking someone’s immigration or holding them for Immigrations and Customs Enforcement agents — unless they’ve been convicted of a crime. AB 291 prohibits landlords (you know, like, private citizens who own private property) from reporting renters who are in the US illegally.
  1. The DMV is raising vehicle registration fees: This is a minor blip in California’s war on cars, but it’s a frustrating one, because, really, this is the only thing that could make the DMV experience even worse. SB 1 increases vehicle registration fees between $25 and $175, depending on the vehicle’s value.
  1. Employers can’t ask applicants about their salary history: Private employers — yes, private employers — can’t ask people who want money from them silly questions like how much money they’ve made in the past or are making at their current job. It will be interesting to see the inevitable unintended consequences of AB 168. It will be at least a little more difficult for a company to gauge what a reasonable offer looks like without knowing what an applicant is currently making or recently made. Sure, employers will ask questions like, “What would you like to make?” and smart applicants will clarify their expectations at some point in the interview process. But, really, it’s not the government’s business how an employer and an applicant work out any mutually beneficial agreement.
  1. Low-skilled workers will have a harder time finding work: That’s just a fancy way of saying, “The minimum wage will increase from $10.50 an hour to $11 an hour.” Under SB 3, the minimum wage will increase each year until it hits $15 an hour in 2022. For people who already have jobs, this is no big deal. For people making below the minimum wage who keep their jobs and get a pay increase, it’s great. But for low-skilled workers who need a job, this is bad news. A company is not going to pay a 20-year-old $11 an hour if he’s only bringing $9 an hour worth of value to the company. It will either make do without that position, automate, or move to a state whose legislature has some grasp of basic economics. But, really, as with #3 above, it’s not the government’s business how an employer and employee work out a mutually beneficial wage. If an applicant wants to make $9 an hour, and an employer wants to pay $9 an hour, how is it not a bad thing for the government to say that’s illegal?
  1. You can make up your gender on official state IDs: California will abolish its requirement that a person must go “clinically appropriate treatment for the purpose of gender transition” if they want to change the sex on their birth certificate, which means that men can say they’re women, and vice-versa, on state IDs like driver’s licenses. Beginning in 2019, driver’s licenses will have three options for sex: male, female, and nonbinary.
  1. Schools will no longer be allowed to decide whether or not they’re “gun-free zones”: Because the legislature has decided for them. AB 424 says school administrators can no longer permit employees with concealed carry permits to conceal and carry firearms on campus. Which means the only people with guns on campus will be criminals and campus police, who more often than not can only respond to shootings, not prevent them.

Has reading this list spiked your heart rate? Then you’ll be calmed by AB 64, which legalizes the sale and cultivation of recreational-use marijuana.

 

DHS weighs major change to H-1B foreign tech worker visa program

With just ONE action by President Trump, hundreds of thousands of Americans would get tech jobs—and others would get pay raises.  The better news is that ration economic activity would return to the U.S.—since the government would not be creating a policy that exploits foreigners and brings down American wages.

“The Department of Homeland Security is considering new regulations that would prevent H-1B visa extensions, according to two U.S. sources briefed on the proposal. The measure potentially could stop hundreds of thousands of foreign workers from keeping their H-1B visas while their green card applications are pending.

The proposal, being drafted in memos shared between DHS department heads, is part of President Donald Trump’s “Buy American, Hire American” initiative promised during the 2016 campaign.

The administration is specifically looking at whether it can reinterpret the “may grant” language of the American Competitiveness in the 21st Century Act to stop making the extensions.”

The good news is that the congressional Democrats could not stop this—it would be by Executive action—not the protectionist policies of the Obama Administration.

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DHS weighs major change to H-1B foreign tech worker visa program

By Franco Ordoñez, Fresno Bee,   12/30/17

The Department of Homeland Security is considering new regulations that would prevent H-1B visa extensions, according to two U.S. sources briefed on the proposal. The measure potentially could stop hundreds of thousands of foreign workers from keeping their H-1B visas while their green card applications are pending.

The proposal, being drafted in memos shared between DHS department heads, is part of President Donald Trump’s “Buy American, Hire American” initiative promised during the 2016 campaign.

The administration is specifically looking at whether it can reinterpret the “may grant” language of the American Competitiveness in the 21st Century Act to stop making the extentions. The act currently allows the administration to extend the H-1B visas for thousands of immigrants, predominantly Indian immigrants, beyond the allowed two three-year terms if a green card is pending.

“The idea is to create a sort of ‘self- deportation’ of hundreds of thousands of Indian tech workers in the United States to open up those jobs for Americans,” said a U.S. source briefed by Homeland Security officials.

Officials at U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, which is under DHS, said they can’t discuss “any part of the pre-decisional processes.”

“The agency is considering a number of policy and regulatory changes to carry out the President’s Buy American, Hire American Executive Order, including a thorough review of employment-based visa programs,” said Jonathan Withington, chief of media relations for USCIS.

The proposal is part of a series of new regulations the Trump administration is taking at the same time a bipartisan group of lawmakers moves forward on legislation to tighten rules that award visas to H-1B holders. The administration also has announced plans to end work eligibility for spouses of H-1B holders. In addition, the administration is considering changes to the allocation of H-1B visas to give priority to more highly educated and skilled workers.

Understanding H-1B Visas

Among those applying to use the visa workers are companies that have been awarded millions of dollars in state grants under agreements to create jobs in Charlotte and elsewhere.

Todd Sumlin tsumlin@charlotteobserver.com

While the H-1B issue doesn’t draw the same attention as other immigration-related policy deliberations, such as building a wall across the southern border, it is significant to American employers. Tech giants such as Facebook and other big companies, from Bank of America to Caterpillar, have long argued that the 85,000 annual cap on these visas is too low and that they need to bring in more foreign tech workers because they can’t find enough highly-skilled American workers.

On the other side, critics of the program say H-1B visas are increasingly being abused and that American workers are being laid off as U.S. companies send work to outsourcing companies that employ thousands of H-1B workers.

Earlier this year, Trump signed an executive order calling for a review of the H-1B program in order to suggest changes to ensure the most skilled and highest–paid applicants receive H-1B visas. “This historic action declares that the policy of our government is to aggressively promote and use American-made goods and to ensure that American labor is hired to do the job. It’s America first, you better believe it,” Trump said in April when announcing the executive order.

John Miano, a lawyer who represents American workers who say that they have lost jobs unfairly to low-skilled H-1B visa holders, said Trump can only do so much to fix H-1B program, which he said should be scrapped.

“You can throw a dart at a random provision in H-1B and delete and probably improve the problem,” he said.

Miano said he would welcome limits to the number of years. He has proposed pulling back the number to even three years. But expected that ultimately Congress would need to approve such a change.

You can throw a dart at a random provision in H-1B and delete and probably improve the problem.

John Miano, a lawyer who represents American workers who say that they have lost jobs unfairly to low-skilled H-1B visa holders

The H-1B visa is typically issued for three to six years to employers to hire a foreign worker. But H-1B holders who have begun the green card process can often renew their work visas indefinitely.

The proposed changes would have a dramatic effect particularly on Indian visa holders considering more than half of all H-1B visas have been awarded to Indian nationals, according to the Pew Research Center.

Lawyers who represent the workers and companies expect lawsuits to be filed if changes to the program were sought without Congressional approval.

“This would be a major catastrophic development as many people have been waiting in line for green cards for over a decade, have U.S. citizen children, own a home,” said Leon Fresco, who served as a deputy assistant attorney general for the Justice Department in the Obama administration who now represent H-1B workers.

Fresco estimates more than 1 million H1-B visa holders in the country are waiting for green cards, many of whom are from India and have been waiting for more than a decade.

 

Ring: How to Reduce the California State Budget by $40 Billion

The General Fund budget of California is $162 billion.  The complete budget, all of the money spent by Sacramento, is around $240 billion—the Socialist/Democrats realize that if you knew that, you would revolt.  What can be done to save the former Golden State?  Ed Ring gives ideas for the first $40 billion.

(7) Face Reality and End the “Sanctuary State” – around $20 billion: According to the United Nations, there are now over 250 million displaced refugees in the world. Right behind them are another 1.2 billion individuals living in extreme poverty. America, with only $330 million residents, is not nearly capable of absorbing even a fraction of these multitudes, much less California with not quite 40 million residents. Yet California has thrown open the doors and foots the bill, betting that the tech boom and asset bubble will last forever. A study by the Federation for American Immigration Reform estimated the cost of undocumented immigrants to California taxpayers at over $25 billion per year – $14.4 billion for education, $4.0 billion for health care, $4.4 billion for justice and law enforcement, $0.8 billion for public assistance, and $1.6 billion for general government services. This scrupulously footnoted study, published in Sept. 2017, got virtually no coverage in the media. What did receive extensive media coverage was a study promoted by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy that estimated the total state and local taxes paid by California’s illegal immigrants to equal nearly $3.0 billion per year. Net cost and potential savings: $22 billion. At the least, California should stop being a magnet state for undocumented immigrants, and instead should help craft then adhere to a realistic national policy.”

It is expensive for the taxpayers for Brown and his buddies to protect law breakers from other countries.  Just think of the crimes that would not be committed!

Jerry Brown Budget 2017

How to Reduce the California State Budget by $40 Billion

By Edward Ring, California Policy Center,  12/28/17
As of a few days ago, high-wage earners have a new reason to leave California: their state income taxes are no longer deductible on their federal income tax returns.

Can California’s union-controlled state legislature adapt? Can they lower the top marginal tax rates to keep wealthy people from leaving California?

The short answer is, no, they cannot. They cannot conceive of the possibility that California’s current economic success is not because of their confiscatory policies, but in spite of them.

Earlier this year California’s union controlled legislature approved a gas tax increase that will increase state tax revenue by about $5.0 billion per year. Next in their sights is changing property taxes to a “split roll” system, whereby all commercial properties will no longer be protected from steep tax rate increases. Also under consideration is extending sales taxes to services, along with taxes on water, marijuana, and, who knows, maybe even robots.

These new taxes have attracted a lot of attention, but in reality California’s state government derives most of its tax revenue, 58%, from personal income tax. In recent years personal income taxes have contributed as much as 65% of the California state government’s total tax revenue. California’s top marginal income tax rate of 13.3% is by far the highest in the U.S. Oregon has the 2nd highest rate, at a much lower 9.9%. The impact of this can be seen on the chart depicted below, which is taken from the State Controller’s most recent annual financial report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2016. As can be seen, state income taxes accounted for 58% of all tax revenue in the most recent fiscal year for which we have data. Nothing else even came close.

When around 60% (or more) of all state tax collections depend on how much money individual residents make each year, revenue can be volatile. A recent analysis by the Franchise Tax Board, as reported in the Sacramento Bee, showed that the top 1% of California taxpayers by income paid 45% of the total income taxes collected. This means that in the last fiscal year, the top 1% paid 26% of ALL taxes collected in the State of California. If you extend that comparison to the top fifth – those Californians who earned on average over $237K in 2013, it can be seen they paid nearly 90% of the total income taxes collected, or 51% of ALL taxes from all sources.

When you have the top fifth of your wage earners paying more than half of ALL taxes collected in your state, you definitely don’t want those folks moving to other states. California has really great weather, but there are a lot of reasons to leave: An inhospitable business climate, a global economy with burgeoning new opportunities in many low tax regions, and an increasingly virtual work environment which means you don’t have to live within 50 miles of the California coast in order to attract venture capital or find business partners.

Just for the sake of argument, here are ways to cut expenses in the state budget, in order to keep California’s state government solvent without punishing the wealthy, or, worse, losing them to other states and nations.

HOW TO REDUCE THE CALIFORNIA STATE BUDGET BY $40+ BILLION

(1) Reduce Costs for Prisons – $2.0 billion or more:  California now spends over $75,000 per year per prisoner, a cost that has doubled since 2005. In Alabama, it costs less than $15,000 per year per prisoner. If California contracted with the State of Alabama to have them house its 130,000 prisoners, that would save California taxpayers $7.8 billion per year. If doing business with Alabama is unpalatable, how about right across the border in Nevada? The State of Nevada spends under $18,000 per year to house their prisoners – sending California’s prisoners across the Sierras to Nevada could save taxpayers $7.4 billion. Obviously relocating California’s prisoners to other states is an extreme solution. But there are many other less extreme, bipartisan solutions to lower prison costs, including alternatives to incarceration.

(2) Cut Ratio of Administrators to Faculty in Public Universities – $2.0 billion or more:  In 2000 California’s UC System employed around 4,000 administrators and 7,000 faculty. Only 15 years later, in 2015, the UC System employed 10,500 administrators and 9,000 faculty. Just assuming for a moment that the administrative overhead in the UC System wasn’t already bloated in 2000, the UC System could reduce their administrative headcount by over 5,000 administrators, and save at least $500 million per year. Do the same thing in California’s much larger Cal State and Community College systems, and you can probably achieve total savings of around $2.0 billion per year

(3) Outsource CalTrans Work and Eliminate Redundant Positions – $2.5 billion or more: CalTrans is set to consume $12.8 billion of the State 2017-18 budget. As recommended by State Senator John Moorlach after an audit of the agency, just eliminating 3,500 redundant positions would save $500 million. But competitive outsourcing of roadwork contracts could save much more. CalTrans only outsources 10% of its roadwork, whereas, for example, Arizona outsources 80% of their roadwork. It is common to take competitive bids from private contractors to do public road maintenance and upgrades – CalTrans is the exception. A very expensive exception.

(4) Fund all CalTrans Work With Proceeds from Bullet Train Financing – another $10 billion per year for ten years: Ok, this isn’t entirely fair. Bonds are deferred taxes. But just imagine if instead of paying for a train that will never make any meaningful contribution whatsoever to relieving the congestion on California’s roads and freeways, all that money was used to improve the roads? Redirecting Bullet Train funds – which are destined to total well in excess of $100 billion – into CalTrans projects would save taxpayers nearly 100% of CalTrans budget for a decade or more.

(5) Slash State Agency Headcount and Pay/Benefits by 20% – $6.5 billion: In 2015 the average pay and benefits for the 154,000 full time employees of state agencies was $116,887. Eliminating 20% of these jobs would save taxpayers $3.6 billion per year. Reducing pay and benefits for the 123,000 remaining state employees by 20% would save another $2.9 billion – their average pay package would “only” be $93,500 per year after this reduction. Is this feasible? Recent history proves that it is. In 2009, cash-strapped California state agencies implemented “Furlough Fridays,” which functionally achieved both objectives described here – there was a 20% reduction in work being performed, and state workers collected 20% less in pay. And guess what? The state government continued to function.

(6) Reform Pensions – $2.1 billion: When you talk about pensions, it is understating the problem to restrict the discussion to state agencies. Local cities, counties and school district pensions combine with state agencies to produce an unfunded liability that – depending on who you ask – ranges between $200 and $700 billion. Moreover, pension reform might be subsumed under the preceding Option #5. Nonetheless, here are the numbers for state agencies: Taxpayers contribute, on average, $21,900 towards each state workers pension, representing 26% of their pay. Just lowering that to a contributory 401K equivalent to 10% of pay would save at least $2.1 billion per year. In reality, because these pensions are so underfunded, getting control of pension benefits would actually save much more than this estimate.

(7) Face Reality and End the “Sanctuary State” – around $20 billion: According to the United Nations, there are now over 250 million displaced refugees in the world. Right behind them are another 1.2 billion individuals living in extreme poverty. America, with only $330 million residents, is not nearly capable of absorbing even a fraction of these multitudes, much less California with not quite 40 million residents. Yet California has thrown open the doors and foots the bill, betting that the tech boom and asset bubble will last forever. A study by the Federation for American Immigration Reform estimated the cost of undocumented immigrants to California taxpayers at over $25 billion per year – $14.4 billion for education, $4.0 billion for health care, $4.4 billion for justice and law enforcement, $0.8 billion for public assistance, and $1.6 billion for general government services. This scrupulously footnoted study, published in Sept. 2017, got virtually no coverage in the media. What did receive extensive media coverage was a study promoted by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy that estimated the total state and local taxes paid by California’s illegal immigrants to equal nearly $3.0 billion per year. Net cost and potential savings: $22 billion. At the least, California should stop being a magnet state for undocumented immigrants, and instead should help craft then adhere to a realistic national policy.

The most powerful special interest in California, government unions, wants nothing to change. They are hostile towards corporations and individual wealth. They have strong incentives to want inefficient, expensive prisons, universities, and infrastructure projects. They have strong incentives to expand all government services to accommodate destitute immigrants. Why? Because the more government workers are hired and the more taxpayers’ money is wasted, the more dues paying government union members they acquire.

Joining these government unions are California’s powerful Latino Legislative Caucus and their allies in the identity politics industry, who recognize a huge political opportunity by spewing separatist demagoguery, nurturing a bleak, tribal paranoia in the collective minds of recently arrived immigrants. Also joining these government unions are left-wing oligarchs and the monopolistic businesses they control, who see in an expanded government and a hostile business climate a chance to prosper through legislated scarcity and mandated product choices. And, of course, the asset bubbles produced by contrived shortages add precarious value to the pension funds and increase property taxes.

So these solutions, while eminently practical, may never see the light of day. But California’s voters should understand that around $40 billion could be cut from the state budget if California’s government was ran in the interests of the people, instead of in the interests of government unions and their elitist allies. If $40 billion were cut from California’s state budget, not only could the new gas tax be repealed, but the top marginal tax rate could be dropped to under 10%. And as any student of the Laffer Curve knows, that might actually keep California’s wealthy from leaving; it might even cause income tax revenue to go UP, as fewer high income individuals feel the need to shelter or defer their taxable earnings.

Edward Ring is a contributing editor for the California Policy Center.

Well Done, Hollywood Left: You Just Got The Second Amendment Totally Wrong (Again)

Do you want to pay $15 a seat to watch a movie, where the leading actors and actresses use armed bodyguards to protect themselves—while demanding you give up your constitutional rights to the Second Amendment?  These leftist elitists look down on the ticket buyer and those that finance their lavish lifestyle.

“Okay—what am I missing here? Asner and Weinberger really just ignore the Supreme Court to peddle a recycled liberal talking point. Of course, the anti-gun Left peddled the tired and disregarded state militia provision, just as they ignore the Citizens United decision and its implications on expanding free speech rights. Also, this line, “the unfettered right of everyone to own, carry, trade and eventually shoot someone with a gun” is just pure trash. Law-abiding gun owners are not killers in waiting. Second, it’s not an unfettered right; Justice Scalia said so in the Heller decision, which they don’t mention in their piece.”

Were it up to me I would not allow the Kardashians—opponents of your self protection rights while hiring dozens of armed guard to protect themselves, not be allowed to have ANY guards—let them live like the rest of us—depend on the 2nd amendment and the cops to protect us—no private armies for them.  What do you think?

handguns

Well Done, Hollywood Left: You Just Got The Second Amendment Totally Wrong (Again)

Matt Vespa, Townhall,  12/29/17

If there’s a reason why Hollywood should just stay out of politics, especially gun politics, and this is your classic example. Ed Asner and Ed Weinberger, a screenwriter, decided to teach the National Rifle Association a history lesson on the left wing site Salon. It dropped a little before Christmas, and it ended with both men getting a face full of buckshot. They argued that our Founders were pro-gun control, which is odd given that the first shots fired in our American Revolution at the battles of Lexington and Concord, were in response to British soldiers trying to seize our guns. Still, let’s go through their arguments:

Now that we have your attention, let’s consider the case made by the NRA, its Congressional hired hands, the majority of the Supreme Court, and various right wing pundits who claim the Second Amendment is not simply about state militias but guarantees the unfettered right of everyone to own, carry, trade and eventually shoot someone with a gun.

First, here’s that elusive Second Amendment as it now appears in the Bill of Rights: “A well-regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.”

Arguably not the clearest amendment in the Constitution. And that’s the problem with it: While stating the need for a “well-regulated Militia,” does it at the same time also guarantee the individual citizen the personal right to “keep and bear arms?” In 2008, Justice Antonin Scalia, ruling for the Majority, said that it was. Ignoring over 200 years of precedent, historical context, the Framers’ Intent and the D.C. laws of its elected officials, Scalia relied solely on the text, arbitrarily dividing the Amendment into two parts. The first – “a well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free State” — he called the prefatory clause. The second part – “the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed” — he called the operative clause. Claiming that second part was all that really mattered; Scalia discarded as irrelevant that inconvenient reference to a “state militia.

Here is Madison’s first draft of the Second Amendment:

“The right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed, a well-armed and well-regulated militia being the best security of a free country; but no person religiously scrupulous of bearing arms shall be compelled to render military service in person.”

Madison’s intent could not be more obvious: his Second Amendment refers only to state militias. If not, why include that exemption for what we now call “conscientious objectors?”

When Madison’s amendment was rewritten by a joint committee from the House and Senate in 1791, the “religious” exemption was lopped off as too cumbersome in language and too complex to enforce. Thus, the Amendment as it now stands.

Okay—what am I missing here? Asner and Weinberger really just ignore the Supreme Court to peddle a recycled liberal talking point. Of course, the anti-gun Left peddled the tired and disregarded state militia provision, just as they ignore the Citizens United decision and its implications on expanding free speech rights. Also, this line, “the unfettered right of everyone to own, carry, trade and eventually shoot someone with a gun” is just pure trash. Law-abiding gun owners are not killers in waiting. Second, it’s not an unfettered right; Justice Scalia said so in the Heller decision, which they don’t mention in their piece:

Like most rights, the Second Amendment right is not unlimited. It is not a right to keep and carry any weapon whatsoever in any manner whatsoever and for whatever purpose: For example, concealed weapons prohibitions have been upheld under the Amendment or state analogues. The Court’s opinion should not be taken to cast doubt on longstanding prohibitions on the possession of firearms by felons and the mentally ill, or laws forbidding the carrying of fire- arms in sensitive places such as schools and government buildings, or laws imposing conditions and qualifications on the commercial sale of arms.

You hear that guys. You have the right to own a firearm unconnected to a militia, but states have the right to impose their own restrictions, like on concealed carry rights. This is a rather explicit recognition of federalism, along with limiting the Court’s impact so as to not produce challenges to laws prohibiting domestic violence abusers, the mentally ill, and convicted felons from owning firearms—all common sense provisions. Stephen Gutowski found some of Madison’s quotes about the Second Amendment as well. It doesn’t help the pro-gun control hypothesis that’s rather shoddy in this piece. In fact, if these two guys had read Heller, they would see it’s not some SCOTUS opinion intended to turn the country into the Wild West. Anti-gunners, you guys have lost this debate. Gun rights have expanded since this landmark 2008 decision. Every state recognize concealed carry rights, even in Washington D.C. The Second Amendment isn’t going anywhere. Deal with it.

 

Campus Reform’s top 10 liberal outrages of 2017

American college campuses have ended the pretense they are about education and preparing students for the future.  Riots, bullying, hatred of white people, ending free speech, protecting criminals—declaring ALL males are rapists.  Segregating dorms, food service, study halls is the imposition of racism on our campuses.  But, in this case, it is people of color that do not want diversity or learning side by side with white people—The Klan in Tan has taken over our campuses.

‘White Privilege Checklist’ appears in Minnesota dorm

A display in a University of Minnesota residence hall provides an 11-point “checklist” to help students identify their “white privilege.”

The checklist featured 11 statements that ostensibly apply exclusively to white people, including statements such as “I can arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time,” and “I can go shopping alone most of the time, pretty well assured that I will not be followed or harassed.”

Would hire someone that is a bigot?  These students are making themselves qualified to riot and promoter racist policy, not to do productive work in a free society.

Sather Gate, UC Berkeley

Campus Reform’s top 10 liberal outrages of 2017

Campus Reform Staff, 12/28/17

 

  • Campus Reform published more than 1,500 articles this year exposing liberal bias and abuse on college campuses, so we let our readers determine the top 10 stories of 2017.
  • From “pee privilege” to a “Leftist Fight Club,” the stories showcase the wide variety of leftist excesses that pervade American higher education.

Campus Reform published more than 1,500 articles this year exposing liberal bias and abuse on college campuses, so we let our readers determine the top 10 stories of 2017.

The outrages run the gamut, from the absurd—such as the Greek Life retreat that was called off due to a discarded banana peel, or the sign alerting students to their “pee privilege”—to the abhorrent—outright acts of physical violence against conservatives students on their own campuses.

Here, in descending order, are the most widely-read Campus Reform stories of the year:

  1. ’Leftist Fight Club’ trains UCF students to fight Republicans

In early February, the “Knights for Socialism” group at the University of Central Florida (UCF) held a “Leftist Fight Club” workshop to teach liberal students how to “BASH THE FASH.” The training, conducted by a martial arts expert, was open to everyone but Republicans.

“In response to the record number of hate crimes against Latinxs, Immigrants, Muslims, Women, the LGBTQIA+ community, Jews, African Americans and other minorities since the rise of Donald Trump and other Alt-Right Neo-Nazis, Knights for Socialism has decided to host a series of self-defense clinics for anyone that wants to learn how to BASH THE FASH,” the group explained on the Facebook event page.

  1. VIDEO: Students love Trump’s tax plan…when told it’s Bernie’s

President Donald Trump’s proposal for comprehensive tax reform was almost immediately dismissed as heartless by liberal academics and progressive students, but we wanted to know what college students really think about the tax plan.

As it turns out, most of the students we interviewed were enthralled by Trump’s tax proposals…when they thought the ideas came from Bernie Sanders.

  1. Greek Life retreat cancelled after banana peel found in tree

A Greek Life retreat at the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss) was abruptly cancelled in August after students spotted a banana peel hanging in a tree, prompting Interim Director of Fraternity and Sorority Life Alexa Lee Arndt to lament that “many members of our community were hurt, frightened, and upset by what occurred at IMPACT.”

Student Ryan Swanson later admitted responsibility, explaining that he had discarded the banana peel after he was unable to find a garbage can nearby.

  1. Gender-swap experiment shows Hillary even less likable as a man

Following the results of the 2016 election, many speculated that Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton lost because she was a woman.

An experiment designed to reveal gender bias by reenacting the presidential debates with the candidates’ genders reversed, however, found that Clinton would have been even less likeable as a man—a result that surprised even the professor who designed the experiment.

  1. VIDEO: UNLV prof blames Las Vegas massacre on Trump

A University of Nevada-Las Vegas professor told her class that President Trump was to blame for the horrific massacre that occurred just five miles away from campus.

UNLV Assistant Professor Tess Winkelmann told her students that when Trump got elected, “I told my classes three semesters ago, some of us won’t be affected by this presidency, but others are going to die. Other people will die because of this.”

  1. ‘White Privilege Checklist’ appears in Minnesota dorm

A display in a University of Minnesota residence hall provides an 11-point “checklist” to help students identify their “white privilege.”

The checklist featured 11 statements that ostensibly apply exclusively to white people, including statements such as “I can arrange to be in the company of people of my race most of the time,” and “I can go shopping alone most of the time, pretty well assured that I will not be followed or harassed.”

  1. CSUF prof allegedly assaults conservative student on campus

In February, a California State University, Fullerton professor allegedly assaulted a College Republicans member in broad daylight during a demonstration against President Trump’s executive order on immigration.

The students identified the assailant as a part-time anthropology professor Eric Canin and said that they were prepared to press charges against the academic. The school later suspended Canin after confirming the allegations through an internal investigation.

  1. Prof: Algebra, geometry perpetuate white privilege

A math education professor at the University of Illinois claimed that algebra and geometry skills perpetuate “unearned privilege” among whites and that educators must be aware of the “politics that mathematics brings” in society.

“On many levels, mathematics itself operates as Whiteness,” Rochelle Gutierrez wrote in her book. “Who gets credit for doing and developing mathematics, who is capable in mathematics, and who is seen as part of the mathematical community is generally viewed as White.”

  1. College asks students to contemplate ‘pee privilege’

Northern Arizona University attempted to expand the frontier of social justice by posting signs outside of campus bathrooms that asked students if they have “pee privilege.”

The university later claimed that the placards were “NOT authorized” by the school and that the administration is attempting to identify those who posted the flyers.

  1. Prof lets students choose own grades for ‘stress reduction’

A University of Georgia professor has adopted a policy that allows students to select their own grades if they “feel unduly stressed” by their actual grade in class.

Two online course syllabi for Dr. Richard Watson’s courses explain that the academic implemented the policy because “emotional reactions to stressful situations can have profound consequences for all involved.”

 

The Places That May Never Recover From the Recession

While Silicon Valley is still doing well, there are parts of California that have not recovered from the recession, high California taxes and job killing regulations.

“But there’s another type of left-behind community that’s gotten far less attention. These towns are located in the suburbs of the American west, in regions hit hard by the housing crisis—Southern California, Las Vegas, and Arizona. Hemet, a suburb of Riverside, California, with a population of 84,000, ranked eighth on EIG’s most distressed small-and-mid-sized-cities list. In Hemet, according to the group’s report, employment fell 15.5 percent between 2011 and 2015, while it grew 9.4 percent nationwide. The number of businesses in Hemet dropped 4.8 percent over that time period. The median home price, at $237,000, is still 30 percent lower than it was in 2006.

Why hasn’t Hemet found surer footing? For one thing, the region where Hemet is located was decimated by the housing crisis, with among the highest foreclosure and unemployment rates in the nation; many families are still recovering. But Hemet’s problems are also the result of structural changes in the economy—changes that have been underway for decades but were masked by the heady days of the housing boom. Middle-class jobs have been disappearing while high-wage and low-wage jobs have grown—but in different geographic locations. High-wage jobs are often located in big cities, while low-wage jobs are in relatively cheap locations like suburbs and small cities.”

Housing costs artificially raised due to government mandates, clogged freeways making it better to live near dense populations, crumbling government pension systems causing local government to cut back on basic services and a public safety disaster caused by Prop. 47, 57, AB 109 and the Socialist/Democrat Party policies of protecting criminals from foreign countries at the expense and safety of honest citizens.  California is headed into dark times.  Are you ready?

Californias-state-flag

The Places That May Never Recover From the Recession

The Rust Belt isn’t the only region left behind by the economic recovery. The suburbs of the American west are struggling, too.

 

Alana Semuels, The Atlantic,  12/29/17

HEMET, California—Many cities across America are doing better today than they were before the recession. This is not one of them. A decade after the start of the Great Recession, it struggles with pervasive crime and poverty. “We’re still recovering—we were really hit hard on all levels,” Linda Krupa, the mayor of Hemet, told me. A fifth of the population lives below the poverty line, up from 13 percent in 2005.

Hemet is not alone in its troubles. A report released this year by the Economic Innovation Group, a research group started by Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, found that one in six Americans lives in what the group calls “economically distressed communities” that are “increasingly alienated from the benefits of the modern economy.” Such communities have high shares of poverty, many housing vacancies, a large proportion of adults without a high-school diploma, high joblessness, and a lower median income than the rest of the state in which they are located. They also lost jobs and businesses between 2011 and 2015.

Many of these distressed communities are located in Rust Belt states like Ohio, New York, and Michigan. They include Youngstown, Buffalo, and Flint. In the months after the 2016 election, there was a lot of conversation about how people living in these areas felt left behind by the changing economy and the prosperity in the rest of the country.

But there’s another type of left-behind community that’s gotten far less attention. These towns are located in the suburbs of the American west, in regions hit hard by the housing crisis—Southern California, Las Vegas, and Arizona. Hemet, a suburb of Riverside, California, with a population of 84,000, ranked eighth on EIG’s most distressed small-and-mid-sized-cities list. In Hemet, according to the group’s report, employment fell 15.5 percent between 2011 and 2015, while it grew 9.4 percent nationwide. The number of businesses in Hemet dropped 4.8 percent over that time period. The median home price, at $237,000, is still 30 percent lower than it was in 2006.

Why hasn’t Hemet found surer footing? For one thing, the region where Hemet is located was decimated by the housing crisis, with among the highest foreclosure and unemployment rates in the nation; many families are still recovering. But Hemet’s problems are also the result of structural changes in the economy—changes that have been underway for decades but were masked by the heady days of the housing boom. Middle-class jobs have been disappearing while high-wage and low-wage jobs have grown—but in different geographic locations. High-wage jobs are often located in big cities, while low-wage jobs are in relatively cheap locations like suburbs and small cities. This dynamic changes the housing markets of these cities, too, with big cities getting more expensive as more high-wage workers migrate there, and low-wage workers leaving cities to seek more affordable housing in the far-away suburbs they can afford. Now that the dust of the recession has cleared, it is evident that the geography of poverty has changed in America. Hemet is emblematic of just how fast—and just how dramatically—this has happened.

I first visited Hemet in 2010, when, as a reporter for the Los Angeles Times, I stumbled across a one-time luxury development that real-estate agents were, at the time, calling a “gated ghetto.” Dozens of families in the community, called Willowalk, had lost their homes to foreclosure and investors had swooped in, bought up the properties, and rented them out, often not checking references and not maintaining the properties. Homeowners were shocked when renters with Section 8 vouchers moved in next door.

When I returned to Hemet this November, I assumed that the development would have bounced back in the seven years since. The houses are huge and Willowalk features a community pool, a lake, and walking trails, all features that, in California’s booming real-estate market, would make the development seem like a steal. But not much has changed in the seven years since I first visited. If anything, the situation has gotten worse for people who remained.

“The crime level just keeps getting higher,” Toni Willden, who bought her home in 2005, told me recently, about Willowalk. The gates that keep out nonresidents get broken once or twice a week, she said. Just about everybody in town knows the code to the gates anyway—I got it by asking the clerk at the hotel where I was staying. Another woman, Amy Aschenberg, whose family in 2014 bought a five-bedroom home overlooking a pond, told me that she and her husband realized they’d made a mistake soon after buying their home. The gated community was filled with renters, who didn’t keep up their homes and who hosted parties late into the night, especially in the summer. Home burglaries—in the middle of the day—happened with alarming regularity. “I would never have moved here if I had known what this place was,” Aschenberg, 36, told me recently.

This gated community is an example of how some neighborhoods that were once middle-class are becoming poorer. “The lack of construction in coastal cities has forced people who are marginally educated and low-income to move inland,” said John Husing, the chief economist of the Inland Empire Economic Partnership. Median rents in Hemet rose just five percent between 2009 and 2016; in Los Angeles, they rose 20 percent, according to Census data.

Krupa, the mayor, has said that the recession caused Hemet to transition from a retirement community to a low-income community because of the influx of new, poor residents. In the suburbs of the Riverside-San Bernardino metro area, including Hemet, the number of people living below the poverty line grew 63 percent, to 596,310, between 2007 and 2016, according to Elizabeth Kneebone, the research director at the University of California-Berkeley’s Terner Center for Housing Innovation. In the suburbs around Las Vegas, the change was even more dramatic: There, the poor population grew 126 percent between 2006 and 2016, according to Kneebone. “It’s the new normal that suburbs are going to be struggling with poverty,” she said.

Hemet problems are in some ways particular to the areas that suffered the most during the housing bust. Suburbs far away from Los Angeles, Las Vegas, and Phoenix, where people bought homes during the “drive til you qualify” housing boom, were plagued by a high number of foreclosures in the bust. After the homes went through foreclosure, they were purchased by investors and rented out, creating new, low-cost rentals. Before the recession, 63 percent of homes in Hemet were owner-occupied, today just 54 percent are, according to Census data.

Renters aren’t necessarily bad for a neighborhood, but the transition of a neighborhood from one of homeowners to one of renters can be disruptive. When a home is lost to foreclosure and then changes hands a number of times, it can upset the community ties in a neighborhood, according to Husing. When homeowners live in their own homes, they are invested in the community, and their own fortunes are bound to those around them. When they live far away and are renting them out, they’re often less able to put time into maintenance and upkeep. “Detached single-family rental housing tends to really upset the social structure of communities,” Husing said. “Many times they never get back.”

Research by Deirdre Pfeiffer, a professor at Arizona State University, found that after investors bought up single-family homes and rented them out in the Phoenix suburb of Chandler, Arizona, the neighborhoods had more service calls to police about violent crime. Husing did a similar study in San Bernardino, the next county over from Riverside, and found that in one city, Ontario, it was 47 percent more likely that police would be called to single-family rentals than to owner-occupied homes, 25 percent more likely that the fire department would be called to single-family rentals, and 36 more likely that the city would have to take out code enforcement actions on single-family rentals than owner-occupied homes.

The problem is not the influx of renters, necessarily, but instead the absentee landlords who don’t keep up homes. I talked to a woman named Domenica Azzolini, who moved into a big house in Willowalk after losing her home to foreclosure. She moved in without seeing the rental because she was desperate for a place, only to find that the floors were unfinished concrete, and that there was black mold growing in the bathroom. Her landlord refused to fix either, so Azzolini paid for the repairs out of her own pocket. The deteriorating upkeep of some neighborhoods like Willowalk has led to an exodus of those who can leave. The Lopezes, the family of first-time homeowners in Willowalk I had profiled in 2010, walked away from their home and moved to another town. “It got so bad that we had to move,” Maria Lopez told me.

Lower-income neighborhoods typically have higher crime rate than higher-income neighborhoods, and an influx of low-income renters has tracked with an uptick in crime in Hemet. According to FBI crime data, in 2016 in Hemet there were more motor vehicle thefts (623), robberies (170), and aggravated assaults (398) than in any other year in the 21st century. “I’ve seen the community really go downhill since the recession,” Jim Ollerton, a lifelong Hemet resident and member of the Hemet Planning Commission told me. “The community is still suffering with a lot of quality-of-life criminal activity.” He recently voted against a new planned condominium in Hemet because he thinks the city has too many rentals.

A for-rent sign in the gated Willowalk community in Hemet (Alana Semuels / The Atlantic)

Of course, the challenges in places like Hemet aren’t just caused by an uptick in low-income new arrivals. People who have lived in these areas for years are also struggling. It’s not that there aren’t jobs: In the last five years, the Inland Empire, as the area encompassing Riverside and San Bernardino counties is called, had the second-fastest rate of job growth in California, after San Francisco. But these jobs aren’t the kind that give families a comfortable middle-class life; rather, they are low-paying and unstable. The fastest-growing industry in the Inland Empire between 2011 and 2016 was warehousing and storage, which more than doubled employment. Other fields that saw big growth were food service and healthcare. They pay isn’t great in any of these fields—in the Inland Empire, the 40,000 or so food-preparation workers make an average of $24,000 a year; the 55,000 material movers make $29,000, and the 30,000 people working in healthcare support make $34,000. “It is the whole nature of this economy not delivering rising real incomes to people in those types of jobs,” Husing said.

It’s not random chance that has concentrated these jobs in places like the Inland Empire. Good-paying jobs for people with college educations are increasingly located in cities. Meanwhile, jobs in retail, manufacturing, and warehousing have suburbanized as companies move to places with cheaper land and labor.“The types of jobs that are more suburbanized tend to be lower-paying,” Kneebone said. And the Inland Empire is essentially one big suburb. The Riverside-San Bernardino area has the worst annual average private-sector wage of the top 50 metropolitan statistical areas in the country, at $40,000 in 2015.

The inflated wages in the construction and finance industries during the housing boom gave suburbs like those in the Inland Empire a few good years in which people could live a middle-class life. Now that lifestyle is out of reach for many, a fact Tricia and Rich Powe know all too well. Before the recession, they did well for themselves—he worked in manufacturing, she was a mortgage counselor.

But they both lost their jobs during the recession, and then lost the home they’d bought in Corona, a suburb of Riverside, in 2008. After a long spell of unemployment, Rich found a new job in manufacturing three years ago, but he began as a temporary worker, and even though he was recently brought on as a full-time employee, he makes $6.25 an hour less than he did before the recession. They haven’t been able to accumulate any savings, and are still paying off loans; Rich for his daughter’s college education, Tricia for school. “We’re living paycheck to paycheck,” Tricia told me. “If we lost our jobs, we’d be in trouble.”

In the end, Hemet is stuck. The city itself can’t convince companies to pay better wages, and it has no control over the rents in big cities that are pushing people out to the suburbs. It has tried to force absentee landlords to keep up their homes, but has limited resources to do so, and struggles to smooth over its transition from a community of homeowners to one of renters. Like many other suburbs and small cities across the country, the economic tide has turned against its residents, leaving them seemingly no path back to vitality. As Hemet and many suburbs like it are finding, growing poverty can lead to even bigger problems—lower tax revenues, fewer businesses able to stay put, worse services like schools and police. This, of course, makes them even less attractive for people who have other choices about where to live. Over time, the situation only gets worse. As nearby cities prosper, and the recession appears as just a bump in the road in the rearview mirror, distressed areas are still there, unable to move ahead.

 

How Riverside County’s budget crunch affects the Probation Department/Public Safety

Thanks to massive increases in mandated contributions to CalPERS, high taxes, high housing costs gridlocked freeways (try going through Riverside County all the way down to Fallbrook and Temecula and see if this is where you want to live)) and unions that demand higher wages and benefits, even if unaffordable, you have a train wreck coming.  In Riverside County that train wreck in public safety.  The cutbacks have started.  Oh, it should be noted the County spent millions on a new County Jail—but unable to open it due to lack of funds for personnel and operating costs.

“To save $10 million, the department plans to let about 100 employees leave — more than 50 already have — without being replaced. Fewer staff means more overtime to run juvenile facilities and less time to intervene with adult offenders before they end up back in handcuffs.

The situation worries the county Board of Supervisors, including Supervisor Kevin Jeffries.

“Our probation department is the last line of a proactive approach to making sure that some level of supervision and reporting-in is occurring,” he said  “Without some level of supervision or accountability, the courts will effectively be releasing some of these individuals, many of which are repeat offenders, right back into our communities with little or no supervision.”

At the same time the State has mandated that criminals from foreign countries be protected from the Federal government and immigration laws.  Combined, this becomes a powder keg.  Just because government does not call a crime, a crime, does not means there isn’t a crime or victims.

Prison_crowded

How Riverside County’s budget crunch affects the Probation Department

By Jeff Horseman, The Press-Enterprise, 12/30/17

Like some of the people it oversees, the Riverside County Probation Department budget can’t stay out of trouble.

The department, which supervises thousands of probationers and runs the county’s juvenile halls, used $15 million in one-time money to close a budget gap this fiscal year. A similar shortfall is expected when the new budget year starts July 1, but that one-time funding won’t be there.

To save $10 million, the department plans to let about 100 employees leave — more than 50 already have — without being replaced. Fewer staff means more overtime to run juvenile facilities and less time to intervene with adult offenders before they end up back in handcuffs.

The situation worries the county Board of Supervisors, including Supervisor Kevin Jeffries.

“Our probation department is the last line of a proactive approach to making sure that some level of supervision and reporting-in is occurring,” he said  “Without some level of supervision or accountability, the courts will effectively be releasing some of these individuals, many of which are repeat offenders, right back into our communities with little or no supervision.”

Jeffries added: “It’s easy to see why some of our communities may feel like they are back in the Wild West. The residents expect their government to keep the bad guys off the street or at the very least, supervised when given a second chance.

“We’ve arguably lost control with the repeat low-level offenders living in our homeless camps. All bets (are) off if we can’t supervise the more hard-core offenders.”

Probation is just one part of a gloomy county budget picture.

For years, tax revenue, while growing, hasn’t kept up with a series of new, ongoing and inflexible costs, from raises guaranteed to unionized workers in exchange for pension savings to a spike in the cost of jail inmate health care to satisfy a lawsuit settlement. County officials have used the word “unsustainable” to describe spending in past budgets.

It’s forced the board to dip into savings and use one-time revenue to balance the budget, a practice supervisors want to avoid as they try to replenish reserves and put the county’s finances on a sustainable path, with ongoing revenues paying for ongoing expenses.

The John J. Benoit Detention Center in Indio, which will add more than 1,200 beds to an overcrowded jail system, can’t open when construction finishes as expected this summer because money wasn’t set aside to hire and train enough staff, according to Sheriff Stan Sniff, who said deputy patrols in unincorporated communities are at bare-bones levels.

At the same time, the county is bracing for higher pension costs from the California Public Employees’ Retirement System and the possibility of paying more for a mandatory program that cares for indigent disabled and elderly adults. And collective bargaining talks with labor unions have led to angry employees and imposed contract terms sheriff’s deputies, but no new deals.

At the Nov. 14 board meeting, Supervisor John Tavaglione blasted what he described as unfair state funding formulas that don’t give the county the money it needs.

“We’re going to have to make some really, really tough decisions in the next year … that are not going to be very pretty,” Tavaglione said. “And it’s a result of decisions outside of our control.”

‘Need some help’

Rising labor costs and a lack of adequate state funding for realignment — the shifting of responsibility for low-level criminal offenders from the state to counties — factor into probation’s money crunch, Chief Probation Officer Mark Hake said.

Probation caseloads are capped at 60 per officer for medium-risk offenders and 40 per officer for high-risk offenders. There’s less time to intervene with offenders before an infraction and as a result, there’s been an increase in the number of violations by adults, Hake said.

The number of new felony violations by adults rose from 460 in the first three months of 2017 to 588 from July to September of 2017, probation figures show.

Those violations have a ripple effect on the criminal justice system, Hake added. Offenders end up in court and take up scarce jail beds as well as the time and resources of the district attorney’s and public defender’s offices, he said.

“Where we know we can be successful, when we’re (fully) funded and properly staffed, is to be able to be actively engaged with the offenders we’re responsible for,” Hake said. “(By staying connected with offenders), what we’re doing is increasing their rate of success because they know somebody’s looking out for them.”

Overtime in juvenile halls is needed to meet minimum required staffing levels, Hake said. “That wears on staff” and hinders the ability to run services for juvenile offenders, he added.

Probation incurred about $1.296 million in net overtime costs in fiscal 2014-15. That rose to $1.317 million in fiscal 2015-16 before falling to roughly $966,000 last fiscal year.

Eight-eight percent of overtime in fiscal 2016-17 was accrued in juvenile facilities.

Hake said he hopes to avoid layoffs. That said, “the probation department is going to need some help as we look at (next fiscal year) if we want service levels to remain where they’re at,” he said.

At the board’s Nov. 14 meeting, Jeffries said the county executive office, which oversees the county’s $5.5 billion budget, “is going to have a really challenging time trying to bring probation in.”

“We’ve either got to give them more revenues or they’re going to be a really different looking department this time next year,” the supervisor said.

 

Obama Style Racism—Hatred of White People—Promoted on College Campuses.

It is as if the Klan in Tan has taken over our campuses.  Students are being taught about “white” privilege,  “white” supremacy and how white people abuse others.  Even the song “Jingle Bells” was accused of being an example of white support of slavery.  Now colleges are teaching against assimilation—which is why campuses have black only dorms, black/Hispanic only study halls and in some classrooms white students are not allowed to ask questions or differ from the racism promoted by professors.

“”When [people] use racial slurs, microaggressions, or ask the daunting question, ‘where are you from,’ the internalization is damaging.”    “Historically, our education system has been used as an oppressive tool for people of color,” she contends, attributing the condition to “the lack of representation within adults, distance caused by one-sided material, denial of racial tensions or experiences, and implicit bias from educators, classmates, and administration.”

“The societal avoidance of discussing race furthers the perpetuation of Whiteness as the
norm and removes the value of marginalized histories and voices,” she asserts. “We can witness the preservation of Whiteness through immigration laws, the void of ethnic/racial identity
exploration in schools, and the mono-cultured representation in classrooms.”

What does that all mean?  HATE WHITE PEOPLE AND BE PROUD OF THE BIGOTRY.  This is what Eric Holder and Barack Obama have given us—eight years of legitimizing bigotry and hatred of white people, under the guise of “diversity”.

ObamaBegs

Academic: Teachers must prevent ‘assimilation’ of ‘whiteness’

 

Nikita Vladimirov, Campus Reform,   12/29/17

 

  • The SIT Graduate Institute recently published a thesis paper calling for educators to “promote racial identity exploration” so that students of color don’t “assimilate to whiteness.”
  • Without active, ongoing efforts to cultivate ethnic pride, the paper warns, immigrants and students of color will “begin to see how society works” and learn to emulate those “whose behavior is acceptable and rewarded.”

An academic paper published by the SIT Graduate Institute calls on educators to “promote racial identity exploration” so that students of color do not “assimilate” into the dominant culture.

The author, Hadiel Mohamed, says her research “aims to answer how educators can incorporate ethnic/racial identity development in the classroom for youth of color who are driven to pursue Whiteness,” making clear as she goes along that she views “assimilation” as an unambiguously negative outcome.

“When [people] use racial slurs, microaggressions, or ask the daunting question, ‘where are you from,’ the internalization is damaging.”    “Historically, our education system has been used as an oppressive tool for people of color,” she contends, attributing the condition to “the lack of representation within adults, distance caused by one-sided material, denial of racial tensions or experiences, and implicit bias from educators, classmates, and administration.”

“The societal avoidance of discussing race furthers the perpetuation of Whiteness as the
norm and removes the value of marginalized histories and voices,” she asserts. “We can witness the preservation of Whiteness through immigration laws, the void of ethnic/racial identity
exploration in schools, and the mono-cultured representation in classrooms.”

According to Mohamed, “there has been a deliberate attempt at preserving the White race within the United States by racializing our borders” through immigration policies that treat immigrants primarily as “cheap laborers for the country’s economic growth,” such as prioritizing visas for high-skilled foreign workers while restricting entry for refugees.

“Accompanying these laws is the societal encouragement to adapt, conform, and assimilate to Whiteness, yet always being a stain to said purity,” she continues, claiming that such laws “have perpetuated the vicious cycle of poverty which requires immigrant reliance on economic exploitation.”

At the same time, Mohamed notes that because “we silence conversations around racism and race” in our society, white people often lack “the opportunity to learn about anti-racist movements and activists.”

Mohamed goes on to claim that the “trend of racial silence can be witnessed within schools,” where it is “acceptable to point out discrepancies based upon gender imbalances such as having more boys in science courses than girls,” but racial disparities are studiously ignored.

Because school is one place where children “begin to see how society works” and learn “whose behavior is acceptable and rewarded,” she frets that it is also a place where non-white students “begin to normalize oppression,” a process that “forces youth of color to conceptualize ways they need to assimilate to belong within society.”

Whether due to the “implicit bias” of educators or the prevalence of “insults targeting brown and black skin tones, accents, lunch food, cultural differences, parental upbringing, and more,” Mohamed claims that schools “do not welcome anything that veers from the norm,” discouraging students of color from developing a “positive sense of self-identity.”

Arguing that “sources of White superiority come in the format of media, classmates, educators, friends, family, and strangers (even online),” Mohamed states that “when these sources use racial slurs, microaggressions, or ask the daunting question, ‘where are you from,’ the internalization is damaging.”

Even simply identifying immigrants based on their ethnicity, she says, can result in the elimination of “their experiences of discrimination within the racialized environment of the United States.”

To combat this, she posits that teachers must not only “promote racial identity exploration” among students of color, but also “promote White identity exploration for their White students in the classroom” so as to avoid cultivating the perception that white identity is “normal.”

In addition, Mohamed calls for teachers to adopt “anti-racist pedagogy” as a means of countering the “biased narrative…perpetuated within our curriculum, classroom, and educational policy,” defining the term as an “educational philosophy to examine the political and societal injustices enacted upon people of color within the United States and internationally (colonialism and globalization).”

Creating such a classroom atmosphere may include “examining representation within the curriculum,” integrating the curriculum with “lessons of diversity,” incorporating “lessons of structural oppression,” and encouraging students “to change these injustices.”

Mohamed did not immediately respond to Campus Reform’s request for comment.