Did You Ever See a Dream Walking?

First Donald Trump was deplorable: Sexist, racist, misogynist and a few other things. Crazy/Nazi. Then he was just incompetent. A that’s just on the left.

William F. BuckleyTrump’s critics on the right have focused on his loutish behavior. It disqualifies him for the presidency, according to one National Review pundit. Worse, he’s intellectually shallow. If you could be a fly on the wall of the National Review Editorial Board meetings, you can imagine hearing this: “If only he had read Did You Ever See A Dream Walking?’ by William F. Buckley, Jr.”

While the right continues to focus on Trump as an intellectual/moral manqué, the left is now trying to figure out Trump via Freudian analysis and ESP. But 33-year-old Michael Kruse has figured out that we have to take a close look at Trump’s theology. He’s on to something.

Politics is theology by different means. Always has been. Always will be. But Americans hate theology and we don’t notice it when our political ideas project our theological assumptions, which are mostly naïve and uncritical. Don’t need no Tri-ni-ty. Don’t need no salvation his-to-ry. Don’t need no A-tone-ment. Just need to know where Di-Maggio went.

Americans don’t go in for profound intellectual theories. We love dreaming dreams.

Trump’s personality and world view have been deeply influenced by Norman Vincent Peale. According to Kruse’s recent Politico article, Trump’s father was a personal friend and devoted follower of Peale and his lessons on the “Power of Positive Thinking.”  Trump inherited that devotion. Peale even officiated at Trump’s first wedding.

Do we have a duty to understand where a president is “coming from”? If so, you will get lost if you try to follow all of his conservative critics who try to trace and interpret his somewhat bouncy political allegiances in his past. The “dream a better future for yourself and for America” theology of the Rev’d Peale is the one constant.

The American experience has always included a strong dose of magic. If you dream dreams they will come true. Whether you are a New England Puritan dreaming of a religious utopia, or a hard scrabble pioneer farmer, or Martin Luther King, or, yes, even William F. Buckley, Jr., dreaming dreams and expecting them to come true is the essence of America. It’s still why half the planet wants to come here.

This explains most of what is Trump’s mystical connection with his supporters. In reaction to DACA, the response of Trump supporters is simple and clear and resounding: We have dreams too! But the Washington Swamp is robbing us of those dreams.

Trump is not an Aristotelian. He’s not a Randian. He has no ideology and this is what makes him incomprehensible to his critics on the right and the left and in the media/corporate/political complex.

He has a dream that something can happen. He focuses on it relentlessly. He repeats it to himself and others constantly. Until it comes true. This is why Scott Adams calls Trump a “Master Persuader.”

Dreams and visions don’t always square with facts. That’s why Aristotle ridiculed Plato. For his visions. If you think facts matter, read Aristotle and hate Trump. But Plato understood that it’s what moves people that counts. And facts and figures and analytical theories don’t move people. Visions do.

Remember the president that admitted not being so great at “the vision thing”? Trump is great at it. As a dreamer, as a visionary, he’s firmly within the American Tradition. It remains to be seen whether his magic contains more powerful juju than that of his enemies.

I have to add that I like Trump. And while I have to confess that from a theological and philosophical perspective I’m not big into the “dreaming dreams” definition of success, I can’t argue with the obvious takeaway: Donald Trump, far from being some political aberration, or someone who is outside of the American political and religious tradition, is profoundly situated at its center.

Owen Jones is a business owner whose first campaign was for Claude Kirk for Governor of Florida in 1966.  He’s moved slightly to the right each year since.

John Moorlach — Government Union Costs

The California Policy Center is back with another well written piece on the power of public employee unions, Sacramento’s “Daddy” (see MOORLACH UPDATE — Secretive and Expensive Union Deals — November 3, 2017).

You know I’ve been ferreting out the disappointing data that makes California’s Department of Transportation, Caltrans, one of the most disappointing DOTs in the nation and that reform is preferred over a new tax; that I have opposed high-speed rail from the get go; that I have opposed trolleys in Orange County; that I tried a CEQA reform legislative effort last year; and you know I’ve been warning you about public employee defined benefit pension plan rising costs for more than 16 years. This piece addresses them all.

BONUS:  Recently, I have begun my own weekly podcast, “The O.C. – Sacramento Connection.” On these podcasts, I have and will continue to share my thoughts on  several issues including some of the ones in this update.

CLICK HERE to listen to my podcasts on iTunes free of charge.

INVITATION: My District Office has started a new Veterans Day tradition. Last year we had a simple afternoon ceremony at Crystal Cove State Beach to review the World War II history within its boundaries. Dan Worthington discussed the Fire Station, a WWII bunker that kept an eye on the California coast during the beginning of the war, pre-radar, to signal the alarm should the Japanese Fleet appear over the horizon. There is a similar location at Bolsa Chica and the west side of Catalina Island has ten such bunkers!

This year we have invited noted author Chris Epting to speak on the subject of “The Day the War Hit The Shore.” Orange County incurred civilian casualties stateside during WWII, an extremely rare occurrence. This tragic episode has been lost over time, but has many valuable lessons to this day.

Please attend your traditional Veterans Day ceremonies at the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month on Saturday. If you want an afternoon break, join us at 3 p.m. We’ll meet at 21871 Newland Street in Huntington Beach. There should be some parking spaces at the neighboring wildlife center.

We will also have surviving family members present of those who were lost to this unique chapter in WWII local history. If you enjoy local Orange County history, this will be a relaxed setting to actually share war stories. Please RSVP with Aly Henderson at aly.john@sen.ca.gov or 714-662-6050.

John Moorlach – Scary Week Ahead

Early this week, Californians will enjoy two major events. On Tuesday, they will participate in handing out candy to the children in their neighborhoods for Halloween. The next day, Sacramento will provide its own version of “trick or treat” by increasing the gas tax. It should be a scary week.

Sacramento is to blame for neglecting the roads in California. Instead of addressing the symptoms, like bad management, budgeting and hiring, the majority party focused its attention on raising taxes (again!).

I have tried to research California’s Department of Transportation since I was elected on March 17, 2015.  The metrics suck. And my attempts to fix them have been voted down by the Democrats (see MOORLACH UPDATE — Caltrans Boondoggles).

A gas tax increase presents a real problem to a good number of Californians. Those who are wealthy and living near the coast won’t even notice. But, the following sampling of people will:

  • The 20 percent-plus of the population that are living at or below the poverty level (the highest percentage for any state in the nation – after four decades of Democrat control of the Legislature).
  • Those who have lengthy commutes into Orange County because they found affordable housing in the Inland Empire. Add to this those that commute great distances to get to their jobs in Silicon Valley. (And Sacramento wonders why its roads are in disrepair.)
  • Those who are spending nearly half of their disposable income on housing, thanks to increasing rents and home prices.

Expect plenty of editorials on the November 1st gas tax increase over the next few days.  Click here to read the article by the Napa Valley Register.

President Trump’s weekly address: 10/7/17

“When the worst of humanity strikes, the best of humanity responds.” – President Trump

 

John Moorlach: “Who’s Your Daddy?” bills

When assembling the 2017 top 20 worst bills going to the governor’s desk, there were some 15 that were “Who’s Your Daddy?” bills. I could only include a sampling (see MOORLACH UPDATE — 2017 Top 20 Veto Worthy Bills — ).
Nearly two years ago, I provided an extensive analysis of how the public employee unions run Sacramento (see MOORLACH UPDATE — Blame the Unions —
One of my biggest concerns in this posting was reiterated recently (see MOORLACH UPDATE — What Pension Crisis? — ). “The unions will say it wasn’t our fault. We didn’t vote for it. You guys [the elected officials] voted for it,” said Sen. Moorlach in an interview Monday.
.  In fact, it even became a segment of a TBS MLB Post Season show.
The bill that set this chant in my brain this session was AB1250, which would greatly increase the cost to counties of personal-service contracts, sharply reducing help given to citizens, especially the poor. We introduced the consequences of the bill to you in this posting: MOORLACH UPDATE — Who’s Your Daddy? — I provided the fun when I asked this very question in the Senate Governance and Finance Committee meeting
I provided my own editorial, on the premise that AB1250 was not being relegated to a two-year bill status and may be resurrected and show up at the last minute on the Senate Floor (it didn’t) in MOORLACH UPDATE: Who Runs Our Government?
By the final night of session, one Democrat Senator made Bingo cards. The squares were words that may be spoken on the floor. This is one way to while away the hours as this annual exercise drones on past midnight. I heard one square stated, “Sen. Moorlach says ‘Who’s Your Daddy?'” The chant had sunk in.
The OC Register provides the details of the union-assisting bills in my editorial submission.
A common union tactic is to twist something. The headline of a recent post did just that. As Sacramento is brimming with current and retired state employees, the headline was inflammatory, when not factually accurate.  So, I decided to provide a clarification. The good news?  It was printed.

John Moorlach: What Pension Crisis?

I sit on the Senate Public Employment and Retirement Committee, which held a joint hearing with its Assembly counterpart earlier this year. During the hearing I asked a very difficult question of Dane Hutchings, the legislative representative of the California League of Cities (see MOORLACH UPDATE — 37th in the 37th — August 9, 2017).

In shaping my question, I used the “F” word – “fraud” – and it caught the attention of CalPERS and its administration. This started a dialogue, which has been very helpful. So, I recently sent two letters, addressed to two separate CalPERS Board members, requesting very specific information (see  https://www.calpers.ca.gov/docs/board-agendas/201709/financeadmin/item-6c-02.pdf and https://www.calpers.ca.gov/docs/board-agendas/201709/financeadmin/item-6c-01.pdf).

Instead of writing back with an affirmative response and attaching the requested data, the matter was put on the agenda of this month’s CalPERS Finance and Administrative Committee meeting (see MOORLACH UPDATE — OC’s Newest Landmark Plaque — September 20, 2017).

The entire segment of the Committee meeting related to my requests is an amazing watch. To have city managers state that they are facing Chapter 9 bankruptcy and even providing the precise upcoming year they may be filing is a massive disclosure. You would think it would be headline news for the local papers where the cities are located. The California Policy Center certainly thought the discussion was disturbing and provides the piece below.

I’m trying to address the pension crisis in California. It’s getting noticed. Let’s hope the testimony of a dozen plan sponsors wakes up the super majority in the Capitol. Also see MOORLACH UPDATE — Pursuing Reforms — August 11, 2017.

BONUS:  If you happen to watch the linked video to the CalPERS meeting, you will observe the public employee unions testify as the concluding witnesses to strong arm those CalPERS Board members who just also happen to be public employee union members. The massive influence of public employee unions in Sacramento is evident and detrimental to the fiscal well being of our state. I discuss this in more detail on Rick Reiff’s most recent “Inside OC” program and it is worth a watch at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t-rpMqqQJJE&feature=youtu.be.

DOUBLE BONUS:  I don’t want to be in the “me thinkest thou protesteth too much” category, but crime is going up (see MOORLACH UPDATE — Taken to Task — August 23, 2017). The FBI released the 2016 crime statistics on Monday of this week and the news is not good. Allow me to give you just one of the many links, as I spend a lot of time in Sacramento, at http://www.kcra.com/article/sacramentos-violent-crime-rate-was-higher-than-us-crime-rate-in-2016/12473362.

TRIPLE BONUS:  To date, the governor has not addressed any of the top 20 bills Assemblyman Harper and I have recommended he veto (see MOORLACH UPDATE — 2017 Top 20 Veto Worthy Bills — September 22, 2017).

President Trump’s weekly address: Four principles for tax reform

Transcript:

My fellow Americans,

The American Family has always been the heart of our great nation.  In homes across this country, families teach their children to work hard, to love each other, and to make the most of their talents in pursuit of their dreams.

Yet for too long, American families have been hurt by Washington’s policies that put the interests of other countries before the interests of our country.

That is why, in my Administration, we are pursuing tax cuts and reform that create jobs in America, for American workers – not foreign workers, but American workers.

Here are my four principles for tax reform:

First, we are going to make the tax code simple and fair so that families can spend more time with their children, and less time wading through pages of paperwork.  A staggering ninety-four percent of families use professional help to do their taxes – and that’s not fair, that’s not right.  That’s why under our plan, ninety-five percent of Americans will be able to file their tax return on a single page without keeping receipts, tracking paperwork, or filling out extra schedules.

Second, we are going to cut taxes for the middle class so that hardworking Americans can finally save more for their future.  We want to help families keep more of what they earn – and to be able to afford the costs of raising a family.  Our tax code should recognize that the most important investment we can make is in our children.

Third, we are going to restore America’s competitive edge by making our tax system more attractive for investment and job creation.  Our business tax rate is the highest in the world – pushing jobs to foreign countries.  That’s not what we want, that’s not what I’ve been talking about all these years – I’ve been talking about the exact opposite.  We need to bring down our tax rate so we can create jobs, wealth, and opportunity right here, in the United States of America, so we can bring our hobs back and bring our businesses back.  We want tax reform that puts America First.  We want tax reform that makes America great again.

Finally, we are going to bring back trillions of dollars in wealth parked overseas so that it can be invested in our country, where it belongs.

We have a once-in-a-generation opportunity to reform our tax code and pave the way to unprecedented prosperity.  By doing what we’re doing, we will see results like you’ve never seen before.  It will be the largest tax cut in our country’s history.  I am asking members in both parties to come together, to put aside partisan differences, and to pass historic tax reform and tax cuts for the great citizens of our nation.  That’s how we will all succeed and thrive together – as one team, one people, and one American Family.

Thank you, God bless you, and God bless America.

###

John Moorlach: Sacramento has no clue how to solve housing crisis

Sacramento just doesn’t get it. A housing crisis is not solved with new fees, bonds and local government process overrides.

Let’s talk about housing. KQED provides some of the gory details in a recent piece. But, allow me to elaborate. A quick tip, KQED provides the last act first.

For Senate Bill 3 (and 5), I provided the following abbreviated concerns on the Senate Floor:

  1. Let’s review the housing market over the last 11 years. In Orange County, the median price for a home in 1996 was $221,800. Ten years later, after the subprime mortgage boom (for fun, watch “The Big Short”), the median rose to $739,000. With the Great Recession, the median went down to $498,200 in 2011. And, as of June 2017, it is back to $734,200.
  2. Why the recent resurgence?
    • A slow, but steady rise in job growth.
    • Foreign investors. They came in at the market low as a safe haven.
    • Explaining an increase of all-cash transactions; more than 50% in 2013.
    • This has caused a decrease in home ownership and more renters.
    • Difficulty for developers to obtain entitlements and to build.
    • The other usual suspects, like NIMBYism, CEQA and open space demands.
    • For those lucky enough, try working with the California Coastal Commission.

It makes you wonder, what has Sacramento done to address foreign buyers and entitlement restrictions? And, I can see now why SB 714 (Newman) was removed from the calendar this last week, as it doubles down on taking entitled property for building new homes in the city of Brea and requiring total open space. Boy, this bill was so out of touch, the Democrats had to save the author from himself.  But, I digress.

  1. What is the current dilemma?
    • Americans find the home buying process too overwhelming.
    • They find it too difficult to come up with the down payment.
    • More than other generations, millennials value experiences over ownership.
    • Americans change jobs more often than in previous generations.

With SB 2, Sacramento will be adding to the burdens. Within minutes, the Democrats also voted for AB 166 (Salas), which provides exemptions from the new SB 2 fees. You can’t make this stuff up. And those who qualify are not those going through a foreclosure!

Then I warned them about issuing more debt by sharing the following disturbing data from Moody’s Investors Service. Among the 10 largest states in the nation, California joins Illinois and New York as the three worst in all of the following categories:

  1. Debt to personal income – 4.70%, when the median for all states is 2.50%.
  2. Debt per capita – $2,323, when the median is $1,025.
  3. Debt as a percentage of state GDP – 3.94%, when the median is 2.21%

And the state’s own bond credit rating is a measly AA-, just above Illinois, at BBB+. This means that California will be paying higher interest rates than issuing states with top credit ratings.

If this wasn’t enough of a reason to vote against the bond measures, I also gave a lecture on future budget and balance sheet concerns – a “what’s up?” listing:

  1. A $4 billion bond translates into $225 million per year in payments! Where will this come from?  The Senate approved two such bond bills on Friday.
  2. The annual contributions for CalPERS and CalSTRS are also rising.
  3. The Proposition 98 school funding threshold into the General Fund is also rising.
  4. The minimum wage is rising and will impact the budget by $4 billion per year.
  5. The recent voter approved $9 billion bond for school improvements will impact the General Fund by $500 million per year (no wonder the Governor hasn’t released any tranches).

What does all this mean? In a few short years, the General Fund is screwed. But I put it more politely on the Senate floor, stating that “it will be dramatically impacted. Good luck with that.”

Sacramento so much wants California to be like other blue states that are heading for the fiscal precipice, such as Connecticut, Illinois and New York. And quickly. But, this is the wrong race to be in.

You can bet the governor will sign these bills and the monopoly party will pat themselves on the back for once again dealing with a problem with inappropriate solutions. Tragic.

Who Runs Our Government?

Many years ago, it became clear to many of us that Sacramento had two parties, the Republican Party and the Union Party. It is amazing how many bills are approved that incrementally give unions, both public and private, more and more territory over management or nonunion private sector businesses.  It’s a testimony to their effectiveness, that such a small portion of the work force can control so much influence. Now that they have so much influence, that the changes they seek are no longer incremental.  In fact, they are swinging for the fences and seem to be closing in on wholesale ownership of the state.  They will use their power to the fullest, following the dictum of “more.” They are proving that they are “the Daddy” around the Capitol.

The most egregious example this year is AB1250. Almost every newspaper in California has opined against this bill. Consequently, it was reported that it has become a two-year bill. Yet, we have been told that AB1250 may come back to the Senate floor today or tomorrow for a vote (also see MOORLACH UPDATE — AB 1250 OC Opposition — September 5, 2017 MOORLACH UPDATE — AB 1250 Labor Dominance — July 13, 2017 MOORLACH UPDATE — AB 1250 Labor Dominance — July 13, 2017 ).

With this shadow hanging over the Legislature, I submitted one last editorial in opposition and it was published by Fox & Hounds.

Moorlach Update – Whistleblower Reaction

The Senate voted on nearly 200 bills and then adjourned for the week a few hours ago. The only bill a reporter asked my opinion on was SB51. “Why did I vote against it?”

SB51 addresses a certain category of whistleblowers. Having held this title for my efforts back in 1994, you should know that I like whistleblowers very much. Earlier this year, I wrote a bill to protect whistleblowers in college who were being persecuted, vilified and punished for their political beliefs by college professors and administrators. This was a very real problem in my district. See Senate Bill 677, the Student Whistleblower Protection Act.

Incidentally, my bill died at the hands of the legislator who authored SB51, and she was the only opposing vote on SB677 (it received 2 votes, but the other Senate Judiciary Committee members abstained). You’ve got to love the ironies up here in Sacramento.

While the reporter accurately reflects my comments, focusing on my concerns that there were negative fiscal impacts of the state of California absorbing work undertaken by the federal government, it must also be said that my legislative colleagues need to be a little more circumspect and less reactionary in the work we’re doing in the state capitol. SB51 is another bill in a long list of anti-Trump measures that has no real bearing on fixing our poorly run state.

Yes, we need courageous people to stand up when government messes up, which is often enough. However, a new federal administration has the ability to run its websites as it sees fit as long as it obeys all relevant public information and transparency laws.

In all seriousness, while this may be a problem for some, pulling politically controversial links claiming “scientific consensus” on climate change off of a federal government website does not rise to a level of concern for me. As far as I can tell, the information hasn’t disappeared and is available to those that need it. Indeed, all of the scientific data prepared by scientists, often with government grants in government institutions or institutions of higher learning, is redundantly saved and shared in numerous places and any concerns of it being lost are absurd and rise to the level of hyperbole. I tried to address this issue during the very predictable debate over cap and trade on my website, as I prefer providing more information to you, rather than less.

The Mercury News provides my response. Next week we’re anticipating going through more than 300 more bills. The fun life continues.

John Moorlach, R-Costa Mesa, is a state senator representing the 37th District.