Moorlach Update – Whistleblower Reaction

The Senate voted on nearly 200 bills and then adjourned for the week a few hours ago. The only bill a reporter asked my opinion on was SB51. “Why did I vote against it?”

SB51 addresses a certain category of whistleblowers. Having held this title for my efforts back in 1994, you should know that I like whistleblowers very much. Earlier this year, I wrote a bill to protect whistleblowers in college who were being persecuted, vilified and punished for their political beliefs by college professors and administrators. This was a very real problem in my district. See Senate Bill 677, the Student Whistleblower Protection Act.

Incidentally, my bill died at the hands of the legislator who authored SB51, and she was the only opposing vote on SB677 (it received 2 votes, but the other Senate Judiciary Committee members abstained). You’ve got to love the ironies up here in Sacramento.

While the reporter accurately reflects my comments, focusing on my concerns that there were negative fiscal impacts of the state of California absorbing work undertaken by the federal government, it must also be said that my legislative colleagues need to be a little more circumspect and less reactionary in the work we’re doing in the state capitol. SB51 is another bill in a long list of anti-Trump measures that has no real bearing on fixing our poorly run state.

Yes, we need courageous people to stand up when government messes up, which is often enough. However, a new federal administration has the ability to run its websites as it sees fit as long as it obeys all relevant public information and transparency laws.

In all seriousness, while this may be a problem for some, pulling politically controversial links claiming “scientific consensus” on climate change off of a federal government website does not rise to a level of concern for me. As far as I can tell, the information hasn’t disappeared and is available to those that need it. Indeed, all of the scientific data prepared by scientists, often with government grants in government institutions or institutions of higher learning, is redundantly saved and shared in numerous places and any concerns of it being lost are absurd and rise to the level of hyperbole. I tried to address this issue during the very predictable debate over cap and trade on my website, as I prefer providing more information to you, rather than less.

The Mercury News provides my response. Next week we’re anticipating going through more than 300 more bills. The fun life continues.

John Moorlach, R-Costa Mesa, is a state senator representing the 37th District.