Absenteeism surging since schools reopened

We know that government school enrollment, statewide is down about 6%.  What was not known is that many students, enrolled, just do not show up for classes.

“The California Department of Education has not yet released statewide attendance data for the 2021-22 school year, but some school districts reported their attendance rates to EdSource. Oakland Unified posts its attendance publicly.

Stockton Unified said that so far, 39% of its students have been chronically absent, more than double the rate two years ago. The district’s truancy outreach workers are visiting up to 60 homes a day, offering incentives like prizes and backpacks, to encourage students to come to school.

Oakland Unified reported that almost 33% of students were chronically absent as of mid-September. Among transitional kindergartners to fifth graders, the rate was higher than 37%. Two years ago, only 14% in that age group were chronically absent.

Elk Grove Unified, outside Sacramento, reported that more than 26% of its students have been chronically absent since school started, nearly three times the rate two years ago.

Kids are smarter than the professional educators.  They can learn about sex anyplace, they can learn about hate by watching The View, CNN or listen to Biden, Pelosi, Newsom or most any Democrat.  They know they are being lied to about history, taught that math is racist—so why waste the time?

Absenteeism surging since schools reopened

Carolyn Jones, EdSource,   9/27/21   

A month into in-person learning for most California schools, some districts are reporting soaring rates of absenteeism due to stay-at-home quarantines, fear of Covid and general disengagement from school.

Even districts like Elk Grove and Long Beach that had relatively high attendance before Covid have seen big increases in chronic absenteeism — students who have missed more than 10% of school days.

“It’s very concerning. We need to pay close attention to these students,” said Hedy Chang, executive director of Attendance Works, a nonprofit aimed at boosting school attendance. “Not only are they missing out on opportunities to connect with their peers, but they’re missing valuable classroom time to help them recover from learning loss from the previous year.”

The California Department of Education has not yet released statewide attendance data for the 2021-22 school year, but some school districts reported their attendance rates to EdSource. Oakland Unified posts its attendance publicly.

Stockton Unified said that so far, 39% of its students have been chronically absent, more than double the rate two years ago. The district’s truancy outreach workers are visiting up to 60 homes a day, offering incentives like prizes and backpacks, to encourage students to come to school.

Oakland Unified reported that almost 33% of students were chronically absent as of mid-September. Among transitional kindergartners to fifth graders, the rate was higher than 37%. Two years ago, only 14% in that age group were chronically absent.

Elk Grove Unified, outside Sacramento, reported that more than 26% of its students have been chronically absent since school started, nearly three times the rate two years ago.

Long Beach Unified hasn’t compiled its chronic absenteeism data yet, but administrators expect it to be high. The attendance rate — the percentage of enrolled students who show up for school every day — has fallen to 91%, down from almost 96% two years ago. That translates to about 4,000 fewer students showing up for school every day.

Schools receive funding based on their average daily attendance, so they have a financial incentive to keep students in class. Drops in attendance this year would affect districts’ funding in the 2022-23 school year.

In the spring, Gov. Gavin Newsom signed Assembly Bill 86, urging all schools to reopen for in-person learning for the 2021-22 school year, with an option for independent study in some cases. Independent study has been one reason for high levels of absenteeism. Students who are enrolled in long-term independent study still must log on every day and complete their work or the district may mark them absent. Likewise, students who are home for a few days while they’re sick or in quarantine must also complete their schoolwork, or they’ll be marked absent.

Students in quarantine make up the bulk of absences, Chang said, but not all. Some students are skipping school because of lingering mental health or behavior challenges, while others are afraid of contracting Covid. Some have gotten out of the habit of daily school attendance or simply don’t want to be there, she said.

In many rural districts, chronic absenteeism was a problem long before the pandemic. Poverty and geographic isolation make it difficult for some children to get to school regularly, and districts are constantly trying to address the underlying causes. 

Thermalito Union Elementary, a 1,500-student mostly low-income rural district in Butte County, in Northern California, reported 46% of its students have been chronically absent this year, up from 8.8% two years ago.

“My heart goes out to these kids. They’ve lost a year of instruction, and now this,” said Lisa Cruikshank, the district’s director of special projects. “What keeps me up at night is all these kids losing out on high-quality instruction, falling behind, falling through the cracks. We’ve been working so hard to keep kids engaged, but it’s tough.”

Three years ago, Thermalito won a grant to boost student attendance. The district hired extra staff at each school to work with families who struggled to get their children to school. School staff visited families at home, called them personally when their students were absent and made a point to greet students individually when they arrived at school.

At one campus, the principal led a “walking school bus” every morning, escorting children from an apartment complex near the school to class. At another school, staff helped a student’s mother find a job, bringing financial stability to the family and making it easier for the student to get to school.

All those efforts paid off: In just two years, chronic absenteeism dropped by half. But this year has seen that progress erased, Cruikshank said.

Due to a high infection rate in the community, students are frequently exposed to someone who’s tested positive for the virus and are required to stay home for up to 10 days. Once at home, many students aren’t finishing their homework packets, so they’re counted as “absent” during that time, Cruikshank said.

“We have so many families who are struggling, just trying to survive, it’s hard for them to keep their kids engaged in school,” Cruikshank said. “But if we hadn’t made connections before the pandemic, I’m sure we’d see even more families checked out.”

In Long Beach Unified, in Los Angeles County, the spike in absenteeism has been due to students in quarantine who don’t complete their schoolwork, as well as students experiencing behavior issues that make them not want to attend school or who are otherwise disengaged from school, said Erin Simon, assistant superintendent.

Prior to the pandemic, the district had worked for years to improve its attendance figures, offering free bus passes, prizes, school supplies, mentoring and other services to encourage students to attend school. Staff sent personal emails, made calls, and visited families, trying to address whatever barriers kept students from getting to class. By 2018-19, the chronic absenteeism rate was down to 15%.

Anticipating problems with student engagement due to the pandemic, the district expanded its social-emotional offerings before campuses reopened in August. High schools opened wellness centers, the district hired more social workers and teachers honed their skills in recognizing and addressing trauma.

It wasn’t enough, Simon said. After more than a year of remote learning, some students continue to suffer mental health challenges, she said. Suicide threats and misbehavior have soared, as well as absenteeism.

“We thought we were prepared, but we were caught by surprise. … It’s just mind-blowing, and it’s scary,” Simon said, noting that the same phenomenon is happening at schools throughout the country. “We’re doing our best to mitigate it, but it’s not easy because our staff is already overwhelmed. … Our main concern right now is for the wellness of our students and staff.”

Chang, at Attendance Works, said that keeping students in school is more important now than ever, especially after they’ve been out for so long. Attendance is linked to academic performance, discipline and other measures of student success, she said, and a student’s attendance during the beginning of the school year is often a harbinger of their attendance throughout the year.

Students are already facing a host of challenges — learning loss, anxiety and depression due to social isolation, general upheaval due to the pandemic, and grief, in some cases — and missing school may only exacerbate their hardships, she said.

“We need to do everything we can to support these kids,” Chang said. “There’s so much at stake.”

HEARD ON THE TOM/TOMS

HEARD ON THE TOM TOMS

Stephen Frank, California Political News and Views, 9/28/21 

.

VERY BIG STORY!!!!

One of the reasons the Recall failed is the failure of the California Republican Party to register voters.  While the Vice Chair Peter Kuo has been in charge of the effort—and the Chair says this is a priority, the numbers tell the story.

From the Secretary of States website:

October 19, 2020

Republicans      5,334,323  24.2%

Democrat——10,170,317

————————————————————-

August 30, 2021

Republican       5,298,738    24%

Democrats   10,265,897

So in ten months the Republicans LOST  36,000 voter—the Democrats GAINED  95,000 voters   Can we continue to afford this loss of voters—imagine what this means for 2022. That is 131,00 voter turn around in favor of the Democrats.

Since the Republican Party will not register voters it is up to us to save the State.  How many seats will we lose because of this and the GOP allowing the Democrats to normalize the dead and those out of State voting?

TALKING POINTS

  1.  In an email from Bryan Watkins, the CEO of the California Republican Party, sent right after the Recall election he told us to be like goldfish.  Why?  Because goldfish forget ten seconds after a situation.  Actually, according to Wikipedia, “Goldfish have a memory-span of at least three months”.  Either way, we do not want to be like goldfish—we need to be like sharks.  And, maybe that is the problem, the CRP does not want to be like a shark, but like a goldfish in a small bowl swimming in circles.

During the convention Bryan Watkins came to me, in front of several people demanding that I not discuss his “staff”—that if I had a problem I should only mention him.  Guess he was upset that I mentioned the General Counsel of the CRP, Ashlee Titus claimed there was no fraud or corruption in the November 2020 election.  At the legal panel at the convention she was a participant and NEVER mentioned the 440,000 dead people and those that live out of State that got a live ballot—as if that was not evidence of fraud and corruption.  In a couple of days I will do a story about WHY the CRP will not take on this issue and by doing so has NORMALIZED the dead and those in other States getting live ballots.  Please note in her Chairman’s report on Sunday, Patterson also ignored the normalization of dead people getting ballots.

  • From Politico:  “TWEET OF THE DAY: CAGOP Consultant Matt Shupe @MattShupePR: “What will we change moving forward? How will we adapt? We cannot continue to do the same thing over and over and over again hoping that maybe next time it will be different. We’re not even fighting the last war, we’re fighting the last century’s war.”

He is right—we should stop doing things the same way as we have for several years.  For instance, we have NOT done any voter registration—that would help.  The August 7 “convention” was to anoint Kevin Faulconer and use the CRP as his campaign tool—that backfired big time.  The CRP should being suing for honest elections, not just collecting money in the name of “honest elections”.  Another thing, per Matt we should not be doing is raising money for one thing—like the Recall—and then not spend the money on that project.

  • This is what dementia looks like:

Biden Says 97% To 98% Of Americans Need To Be Vaccinated Before Returning To Normal

Daily Caller, by Anders Hagstrom Original Article

Posted by Come And Take It — 9/27/2021 5:56:40 PM Post Reply

Almost 100 percent of Americans need to be vaccinated before the country can safely return to normal, President Joe Biden claimed Monday. Biden said that “97%, 98%” is the goal as a country during his much-publicized appointment to receive a COVID-19 booster shot Monday. He offered no explanation for the number. Medical experts, including Dr. Anthony Fauci, have predicted that herd immunity would only require 70% to 85% of Americans to be vaccinated.

  • This is what total weakness looks like:

U.S. Threatens ‘Diplomatic Retaliation’ Against Iran for Obstructing Nuclear Inspectors

Breitbart National Security, by John Hayward Original Article

Posted by earlybird — 9/27/2021 5:33:15 PM Post Reply

The U.S. on Monday accused Iran of violating an agreement made only two weeks ago by barring International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors from a workshop where uranium enrichment centrifuges are produced. The U.S. threatened Iran with “diplomatic retaliation” if it continues obstructing inspectors. The centrifuge facility at TESA Karaj became a major concern for the IAEA in June when monitoring cameras at the site were apparently sabotaged and removed by the Iranians. Footage from one of the destroyed cameras remains unaccounted for. (snip) The IAEA complained Iran was not allowing it to access monitoring cameras at several nuclear facilities, even though their memory cards were filling up with data.

  •  In a few days I will have comments on the CRP convention, the booing of the Chair by most of the convention, as well as allowing self-appointed people to have credentials and give proxies—without the legal authority.
  • This is what TOTAL DEMNETIA LOOKS LIKE:

Dementia Kicking In? Biden Claims His $3.5 Trillion Spending Package Actually
Costs $0

Trending Politics, by Collin Rugg Original Article

Posted by Imright — 9/27/2021 4:43:07 PM Post Reply

Math: Something President Joe Biden can’t comprehend. According to Biden, or whichever handler runs his Twitter account, his $3.5 trillion spending package actually costs “zero dollars.”“ My Build Back Better Agenda costs zero dollars,” Biden claimed in a Twitter posts. How does it cost “zero dollars” you may ask? Because Biden just plans on robbing you, the American taxpayer, to pay for the package which in turn makes it “zero dollars.” Makes total sense!“ My Build Back Better Agenda costs zero dollars,” he tweeted. “Instead of wasting money on tax breaks, loopholes, and tax evasion for big corporations and the wealthy, we can make a once-in-a-generation investment in working America

  • Congrats to the Tea Party California Caucus—they had a dinner—eight miles from the convention hotel at a BBQ place.  Their speaker was Peggy Hall.  They had 107 people attending and turned away 7 more due to lack of space.  Peggy Hall got almost as many to hear her as the CRP did on Friday night to hear the Governor of New Hampshire—and those folks only needed an elevator to get to the banquet room.

 (Periodically the California Political News and Views will publish tidbits of political news, to keep you in the loop of what the pooh bahs know.  The phrase “tom/tom’s” comes from my mentor, Lorelei Kinder who never passed a rumor, just called to tell me what she heard on the “Tom/Tom’s”.  This column is named in her honor.)

State GOP Panelists in San Diego Slam Ballot ‘Shenanigans,’ But Debunk Fraud

In magic shows the magician shows you stuff with the right hand, hoping to get you to concentrate on that, while the left hand does the trick.  This is the hope you would never know what they are hiding.  This panel at the California Republican Party was the political version of a magician.  They spent all their time saying there was no fraud, no corruption—maybe a few mistakes, maybe a few errors.  Even the General Counsel of the CRP, Ashlee Titus has said there was no corruption in California in the 2020 campaign.

Yes, questions were raised about a drunk guy having 300 ballots in his car.  Questions were raised about Dominion and the accuracy of the count.  There were questions about the folding of the ballots, the transparent hole in the absentee ballot envelope.  All of this with the right hand

With the Left hand they refused to discuss the obvious and KNOWN fraud and corruption of the November 2020 election and the Recall election—the Secretary of State sending live ballots to dead people and folks that moved out of State, at least 440,000.  This group of lawyers and experts explained all the marginalized problems—but the big one, not a word of suing to stop.

In a couple of days I will explain WHY the California Republican Party has normalized sending ballots to the dead and those living in other States.  The good news is that the CRP had poll watchers—the bad news is that other groups had already done this—plus about 80% of the votes cast in the Recall were by Absentee Ballot, so poll watchers were a minor problem—and only the Registrar of Voters was able to check see if those sending in the ballots were living or in Texas.

The only thing “debunked” was the right hand—the Left Hand was where the open and known corruption exists.

State GOP Panelists in San Diego Slam Ballot ‘Shenanigans,’ But Debunk Fraud

by Ken Stone, Times of San Diego,  9/24/21  

In 2016, Kathleen Hazelton was San Bernardino County coordinator for Donald Trump’s debut White House campaign.

On Saturday, at the California Republican Party’s fall convention downtown, the retired nurse echoed the former president’s 2020 denunciation of mail ballots.

“I can’t imagine why, [with] something so precious as our vote, we can’t find one hour of the day to go to a poll,” Upland resident Hazelton, 70, said while questioning a panel on recent red-state election laws.

But Fred Whitaker (“respectfully”) and fellow panelist Harmeet Dhillon (“strongly”) disagreed. They strafed Hazelton, an Air Force veteran who in November lost a bid for the 25th District state Senate seat by 28 percentage points.

Whitaker, chair of the Orange County Republican Party, noted how his party had for decades promoted absentee voting and lamented how, in 2020, “there was presidential leadership saying: ‘Don’t trust the mail.’”

But with Republicans holding back until Election Day, he said, the Orange County GOP had to spend “thousands and thousands” of dollars to chase down members with messages of “Please vote.” He told a Manchester Grand Hyatt audience of 85 that 250,000 ballots were turned in Nov. 3 — delaying their count for a week or more “to our detriment.”

He’d later decry “the nonsense that all mail-in balloting is fraudulent or fake, or your ballot’s not going to count,” which lead to headlines alleging low GOP turnout. “Huh? Why is that? It’s because you didn’t mail in your ballot. Vote early. Not often.”

Said election attorney Dhillon, a former San Francisco GOP chair: “When our voters do not vote in time, the media reports that Republicans aren’t voting. That is self-suppression of our vote.”

The bulk of an 80-minute session — titled “Jim Crow 2.0 or Common Sense: The National Debate Over Election Integrity Laws” — was devoted to updating attendees on legal issues faced in California’s recall and congressional and state efforts on voting laws — with repeated quips on Democrats going “insane.”

In a brief appearance, California GOP general counsel Ashlee Titus said congressional Democrats’ sweeping voting-rights bill HR1 “would essentially nationalize the worst parts of California law and … invalidate (some state laws) with a huge broad stroke.”

But Whitaker imagined “a reverse theory.” If the GOP flips the House and Senate and takes the presidency in 2024, “we could produce our own form of HR1” and require Indiana-style voter-ID laws throughout the nation.

“Ladies and gentlemen, I would argue that our elections have often already been federalized in many ways,” he said. “I would actually be in favor of having federal voter ID, a federal ban on ballot harvesting in federal elections. … That’s how we could really clean up things in blue states.” 

Asked why Trump and a Republican Congress couldn’t do this in 2017, he said it was because the GOP for strategic reasons focused on tax reform and Obamacare repeal.

“I think election integrity is probably the one that we should choose” next time as a prime goal, he said. 

Supreme Court rulings on election laws were summarized, including recent conservative opinions backing states as “laboratories of democracy” under the 10th amendment.

Moderator Garrett Fahy of the Republican National Lawyers Association did the honors, injecting jokes into his rundown.

He dealt with the Georgia rule barring people from giving food or water to people in line to vote: “But what do Democrats do? Democrats find people in line and they basically bribe them to vote by giving them water.”

Even worse: He claimed that in South Dakota Republican John Thune’s first U.S. Senate race in 2004, Democrats went to Indian reservations and said: “If you vote this way, we will give you cigarettes. … So the idea that they’re not going to give people water in line? Please.” 

He said legal challenges would eventually land Georgia’s law before the Supreme Court.

“My prediction … is those restrictions are probably going to be upheld because nothing they do is facially discriminatory — meaning nothing in the text of the law can be read to say: ‘This is intended to discriminate or disenfranchise against certain peoples,’” Fahy said.

Fahy responded to a question from Alexander C. Eisner, a Southern California lawyer who bemoaned “chasing our tail with the conspiracy theories” about rigged elections.

“We’re doing our own voter suppression,” Eisner said. “We saw it in the Georgia Senate race, and a lot of reasons we lost the [Gavin Newsom] recall was Republicans not voting due to mistrust of the ballots.”

Moderator Fahy said “very good people” surprisingly bought into “my vote doesn’t count in California,” and thus sat out the election — as some did in the Georgia Senate races. “In any sport, if you don’t go on the field, you will not win.”

He said he heard from someone on Facebook urging supervisors in every county to ask for Cyber Ninja audits, like the recently completed one in Arizona’s Maricopa County. He later added: “So what do we learn from this [Maricopa County audit]? Well, other states … are going to be a lot less quick to do these audits because you don’t want egg on your face.”

Rarely uttering the name of the 45th president, the panelists still evoked Trump’s unfounded allegations of voter fraud, saying recent elections were rife with “shenanigans” that stoked voter mistrust.

While final results were right, Dhillon said, “the irregularities [with some voters getting multiple ballots] were such that they undermine confidence in the outcome of our elections. They are violations of the National Voter Registration Act.” 

Fahy flatly declared that Trump lost Arizona because “he pissed off the [John] McCain family and wouldn’t apologize to Cindy McCain, even though the McCain staff desperately begged him to.” 

Dhillon, a member of the Republican National Committee, correctly said that San Francisco passed a law allowing nonlegal aliens to vote in school board elections if they are parents or guardians of students. (Such voting is rare, though, with only 56 registered to vote in 2018 by one account.)

But she also told the audience, incorrectly, that Portland, Maine, allows non-U.S. citizens to vote in City Council elections, saying: “That’s the bigger issue that requires federal legislation.”

In fact, Portland never enacted such a law. The proposal was dropped in 2018.

Dhillon also cited the Torrance theft of 300 recall ballots, drugs and a gun, likening this to a “Warren Zevon song.”

(The Daily Breeze of Torrance reported: “It did not appear the ballots had been tampered with, and they were believed to have been stolen prior to getting sent to their intended recipients…. There were other pieces of mail also found with the ballots.)

“Videos show people breaking into mailboxes and stealing mail,” she also said. “I say stealing mail. Some people say stealing ballots. Living in San Francisco, the theft of mail during COVID is virtually a certainty if you live in a multi-unit building.”

But Dhillon said to laughter: “Guess what? Democrats don’t cheat in San Francisco. They don’t need to. They have like 90% (Democratic registration).” (Actually, Democrats make up 63% of voters citywide. Republicans are just under 7%).

“This has been a good dress rehearsal for the 2022 election to identify these legal issues,” she said.

Panelists debunked other fears.

One man cited “popular conservative outlets” that urge paper ballots with only humans counting them. “No technology. Is that a good idea or bad?”   

“A very bad idea, frankly,” Whitaker said, “because then you’d never get your election results for two to three months. … We’ve been counting ballots through machines for 65 years.”

Anther canard: that postal workers discard GOP ballots by spotting telltale signs of voter intent via holes in the envelope.

Fahy explained the holes marked the signature line for the benefit of the visually impaired. And every county had different ballot orders.

Dhillon said she got into an argument with a One America News Network host on the ballot-hole issue.

“He wanted me to buy into the fact that it was a grand conspiracy as opposed to dumb, negligent or otherwise what the government does every day in California,” she said. “And you also have to believe that postal workers are all in on some giant conspiracy to screw Republican voters and discard those ballots en masse. It’s a federal crime.”

With people suffering cabin fever, she said, voters are getting their news from social media, which she called slanted and leads to less voting.

“I think every citizen should vote — even if they’re voting for the other guy…. I don’t want Democrats to think that [if] it’s a red county — it’s rigged against them,” she said. “That doesn’t improve our democracy and our country.”

Maxine Waters Celebrates Radical Abortion Bill: ‘Governor Abbott, This One’s for You!’

Maxine Waters is cheering—there is a bill in Congress to kill black babies and female babies—folks she does not want to exist.  Yes, I know Waters is black and a female—but she is alive.  If her values exited when she was born the eugenics based, hate black people Planned Parenthood would have aborted her.

“”We are very proud of this achievement,” said a Pfizer spokesperson. “We can now confidently say that there is only a very small chance your child will suffer life-altering complications or death from the vaccine. Chances are still a bit higher than the chances of your kid dying from COVID, but hey! Give us some credit here! Not bad, huh?”

Experts confirmed that even though there is a statistically 0% chance of kids dying from COVID, parents should still require kids to get the vaccine immediately, to make up for Pfizer’s financial loss from the FDA not approving booster shots right away.

Why does Waters and her Democrat Party hate black people, hate females so much they want them killed—someone needs to ask her that question.  She opposes the Klan killing blacks—so why dies SHE approve of Planned Parenthood doing it—as if they were the Klan.

Maxine Waters Celebrates Radical Abortion Bill: ‘Governor Abbott, This One’s for You!’

Hannah Bleau, Breitbart,  9/25/21 

Far-left California lawmaker Rep. Maxine Waters (D) celebrated the Democrat-passed abortion bill Friday, which essentially bars state governments from enacting any “law, rule, regulation, standard, or other provision” that violates the act permitting the brutal killing of unborn children even up to birth.

“Leave women alone!” the 83-year-old lawmaker declared, blasting Texas for prioritizing protection for unborn children.

“The Texas legislature voted to interfere with a woman’s right to choose & they’re rewarding vigilantes for coming after women & their doctors. Today, I voted to pass the Women’s Health Protection Act. Governor Abbott, this one’s for you!” she said, using the hashtag, #LeaveWomenAlone:

Waters’ slight to Abbott follows the enactment of the Lone Star State’s pro-life law, which bans abortions after a fetal heartbeat is detected.

The Democrat-led House passed the bill, Women’s Health Protection Act, 218-211, with no support from Republicans, who blasted the brutal nature of the legislation.

 “Socialist Democrats’ radical, pro-abortion position has shifted from ‘safe, legal, and rare’[1] to, in some places, pro-infanticide,” Rep. Mo Brooks (R-AL), who voted against the bill, said in a statement.

“Their extreme position is repulsive and science denial of the first order because science confirms that human life begins at conception,” he continued, identifying America as “one of only seven countries worldwide that allows abortions after 20 weeks.”

“That puts America in the same category as notorious human rights abusers China and North Korea. That is not a record Socialist Democrats should be proud of,” he added.

The Democrats’ radical act deems restrictions on abortion as a means perpetuating “systems of oppression, lack of bodily autonomy, white supremacy, and anti-Black racism.”

Pfizer Assures That Vaccine Is Almost As Safe For Kids As COVID

Before the Pfizer vaccine almost no kids got COVID.  Now that we have their gene therapy, kids in large numbers are getting the virus.  You do not have to be a scientists to understand the facts.  Only those making billions off the drug refuse to protect the children from the virus.

Of course Pfizer forgets to tell young men that taking the therapy could cause a lifelong heart problem—but at least they are protected from lawsuits by Congress

“”We are very proud of this achievement,” said a Pfizer spokesperson. “We can now confidently say that there is only a very small chance your child will suffer life-altering complications or death from the vaccine. Chances are still a bit higher than the chances of your kid dying from COVID, but hey! Give us some credit here! Not bad, huh?”

Experts confirmed that even though there is a statistically 0% chance of kids dying from COVID, parents should still require kids to get the vaccine immediately, to make up for Pfizer’s financial loss from the FDA not approving booster shots right away.

Satire?  Looks like real life to me.

Pfizer Assures That Vaccine Is Almost As Safe For Kids As COVID

BabylonBee.com, 9/20/21  https://babylonbee.com/news/fda-assures-vaccine-is-almost-as-safe-for-kids-as-covid

NEW YORK, NY—After conducting several trials, Pfizer has announced that their vaccine is now almost as safe for kids as getting COVID is. 

“We are very proud of this achievement,” said a Pfizer spokesperson. “We can now confidently say that there is only a very small chance your child will suffer life-altering complications or death from the vaccine. Chances are still a bit higher than the chances of your kid dying from COVID, but hey! Give us some credit here! Not bad, huh?”

Experts confirmed that even though there is a statistically 0% chance of kids dying from COVID, parents should still require kids to get the vaccine immediately, to make up for Pfizer’s financial loss from the FDA not approving booster shots right away.

“Besides,” said one expert, “kids are puny and can’t even fight back with their skinny little arms and legs. Just get them vaccinated—to protect yourself—since your safety is the highest priority here.”

Pfizer is hoping they can get kids fully vaccinated before their Q3 sales numbers come out. 

Lawmakers Call High-Speed Rail Plan ‘Foolhardy,’ Threaten to Pull Funding

Finally, even the Sacramento Democrats realize the public understands the High Speed Rail is a fraud, corruption in action.

““I think the, ‘If you build it, they will come,’ theory is pure fantasy,” Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon told NBC Bay Area. “They will come where? How will they magically appear in Merced?”

A Democrat representing Los Angeles County, Rendon fears residents in his district may never see any benefits from high-speed rail at least as it’s presently situated. After touring the project’s construction earlier this summer, Rendon said he’s seen very little progress toward completion.

“You see that same piece of track that I saw last year and the year before and the year before that and the year before that,” Rendon said. “[That structure] seems to be this monument to high-speed rail. Maybe they can turn it into a sculpture if we don’t go much further than where we are right now.

If the Speaker was serious, he would bring a bill to the floor of the Assembly disbanding the High Speed Rail Authority, tell Biden not to give it any more money—and use the money remaining to reverse what they have done.

Lawmakers Call High-Speed Rail Plan ‘Foolhardy,’ Threaten to Pull Funding

According to the High-Speed Rail Authority’s 2020 business plan, the agency has access to around $20 billion over the next 10 years.

By Stephen Stock, Michael Horn and Kevin Nious,,NBCBayArea,  9/12/21 

As Congress works to finalize the largest infrastructure spending bill in decades, a growing number of state lawmakers in Sacramento have begun to raise doubts about California’s biggest venture, the high-speed rail project.

After years of years of battling with property owners, the Trump administration and a global pandemic, California’s High Speed Rail Authority finds itself fighting resistance from state lawmakers even as the project is starting to show obvious progress on the ground.

Visitors along Highway 99 can now easily see the skeleton of the high-speed rail line finally taking form in the Central Valley. Viaducts and cranes outline the initial 171-mile segment that’s expected to take riders from Merced to Bakersfield by 2029 when it’s finished.

Even with that progress, a growing number of decisionmakers in Sacramento say the project remains headed in the wrong direction.

“I think the, ‘If you build it, they will come,’ theory is pure fantasy,” Assembly Speaker Anthony Rendon told NBC Bay Area. “They will come where? How will they magically appear in Merced?”

A Democrat representing Los Angeles County, Rendon fears residents in his district may never see any benefits from high-speed rail at least as it’s presently situated. After touring the project’s construction earlier this summer, Rendon said he’s seen very little progress toward completion.

“You see that same piece of track that I saw last year and the year before and the year before that and the year before that,” Rendon said. “[That structure] seems to be this monument to high-speed rail. Maybe they can turn it into a sculpture if we don’t go much further than where we are right now.

“I’m worried that we’re dead in the water. I’m also worried that we have what would be a laughing stock for California.”

Speaker Rendon wants to divert the rest of the money earmarked for high-speed rail to upgrade existing public transit systems like Caltrain and Metrolink. He told NBC Bay Area that he believes there’s now enough opposition in the legislature to the project that he has the votes to do it.

MERCED TO BAKERSFIELD PLAN “FOOLHARDY”

In March, the High-Speed Rail Authority presented its latest business plan to the legislature. Members of both parties expressed frustration with the plan as presented as well as with the current state of the project.

“The definition of insanity is doing the same thing and expecting a different result,” Assemblymember Vince Fong, R-Bakersfield, said during the hearing where the plan was unveiled.

According to the High-Speed Rail Authority’s 2020 business plan, the agency has access to around $20 billion over the next 10 years. That would be just enough money to finish building the Central Valley segments of the overall project according to an independent legislative analysis. Lawmakers will then have to raise an additional $50 to $80 billion through taxes or fees to build the rest of the system connecting San Francisco and Anaheim. However, Rendon says he’s not prepared to raise another penny until he sees a new plan. 

“We think it’s foolhardy, given all the problems with the program. I think it’s foolhardy to spend the remainder of the money without a sense of how the project is going to flow,” Rendon said.

MORE MONEY MORE PROBLEMS

High-Speed Rail CEO Brian Kelly has spent the past two years negotiating with Washington to restore nearly a billion dollars in funding that had been pulled by the Trump administration for failure to meet construction deadlines. Now he’s facing another battle, now with Sacramento.

“Nobody wants to leave [the project] partially constructed in the valley,” Kelly told NBC Bay Area. “As we finish that work and it’s constructed, the question at some point has to be, “What do you have?’ And I want to have electrified high-speed rail.”

The impasse with state lawmakers is just the latest setback for a project that’s had a year of challenges. The COVID-19 pandemic slowed the pace of construction as more than 300 workers were forced to quarantine. In May, Chief Operating Officer Joe Hedges suddenly resigned after three years on the job. A move that came with few publicly released details about why he left.

As the agency searches for hedges’ replacement, Kelly believes he can work with lawmakers to advance public transit in all regions of the state.

“It’s not this or that. It’s both,” Kelly said. “I respect the legislature. We’ve got to work through these issues and we’re not in full agreement yet. But we’ll get there.”

Under the Obama administration, high-speed rail received two grants totaling $3.4 billion. Kelly believes the project is eligible for more federal funding if the $1 trillion bipartisan infrastructure bill introduced by the new Biden administration becomes law. Meanwhile, Rendon believes the Assembly is committed to blocking all future funding for high-speed rail in next year’s budget if the High-Speed Rail Authority doesn’t present him and other lawmakers with a new business plan.

“We’re determined to make sure we’ll push for more money. But as long as it’s a project that’s accountable. As long as it’s a project that has deliverables. As long as it’s a project that keeps the commitment that we made to Californians,” Rendon said. 

COVID economy: California unemployment claims rocket higher, worst in five months

With the Newsom lockdown, mandates for vaccines and masks, high taxes, bad regulations, we are going to have in October a massive number of teachers, health care and law enforcement professionals either quitting or being fired.  This will be on top of having the nation’s highest unemployment rate—with each week bringing a higher number of unemployed.

“Unemployment claims in California rocketed to their highest level in five months last week, raising uncertainties about the strength of a statewide economy attempting to recover from coronavirus-spawned maladies.

California workers filed 75,800 initial claims for unemployment during the week that ended on Sept. 18, which was an increase of 24,200 from the week ending on Sept. 11, the U.S. Labor Department reported on Thursday.

The total number of claims is the highest the first-time jobless filings have reached since the week ending on April 24 — nearly five months ago — when jobless claims totaled 78,600 for that week, this news organization’s analysis of the Labor Department posts shows.”

Our ports cannot unloaded the ships and truckers are going to be fired for their failure to take the jab.  Be ready for the collapse.

COVID economy: California unemployment claims rocket higher, worst in five months

Jobless claims in California reach highest level since April

By George Avalos, Record-Bee,  9/23/21 

.

Unemployment claims in California rocketed to their highest level in five months last week, raising uncertainties about the strength of a statewide economy attempting to recover from coronavirus-spawned maladies.

California workers filed 75,800 initial claims for unemployment during the week that ended on Sept. 18, which was an increase of 24,200 from the week ending on Sept. 11, the U.S. Labor Department reported on Thursday.

The total number of claims is the highest the first-time jobless filings have reached since the week ending on April 24 — nearly five months ago — when jobless claims totaled 78,600 for that week, this news organization’s analysis of the Labor Department posts shows.

The increase of 24,200 claims is the largest one-week increase since April 3, when jobless filings jumped by 39,100 during the seven-day stretch.

Nationwide, workers filed 351,000 initial claims for unemployment last week, an increase of 16,000 from the 335,000 that workers filed the prior week, the Labor Department reported.

The jobless claims that California workers filed last week are far higher than what would be normal in a healthy statewide economy.

The 75,800 claims that were filed last week are 69% higher than the average weekly totals for January 2020 and February 2020, the final two months before government agencies ordered wide-ranging business shutdowns to combat the spread of the coronavirus. During those two months, unemployment claims averaged 44,800 a week.

‘Reform California’ chairman slams bill to allow illegal immigrants to serve on county central committee

Looks like the Democrats are having a hard time filling their central committee membership slots—now they have passed a law to have illegal aliens serve on these election committees.

“Gov. Gavin Newsom.

“Reform California” chairman Carl DeMaio on Saturday criticized California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s signing of a bill that allows some illegal immigrants to serve on county central committees — one of a number of bills signed to benefit those who entered the country illegally.

“These bills are not just symbolic wokeness, this is a fundamental redefinition of who gets to be elected to office in California, and they’re starting small but this is absolutely the first step,” DeMaio told Fox News.

The bill, was one of a number of bills that Newsom’s office described as “expanding the state’s humane immigration policies by protections and support for immigrants” and included a law ending the use of “alien” to describe non-citizens.

We already have a law allowing law breakers to serve on city and county commissions, the Secretary of State REFUSES to take illegal aliens off the voting rolls (no audit is the reason they can stay).  So, why not have law breakers running your campaigns. 

Reform California’ chairman slams bill to allow illegal immigrants to serve on county central committee

Newsom signed a bill ending the use of ‘alien’ to describe non-citizens

By Adam Shaw | Fox News, 9/26/21 

Joe Basrawi, Today is America strategy director, says ‘this next year’ will display ‘true side’ of Gov. Gavin Newsom.

“Reform California” chairman Carl DeMaio on Saturday criticized California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s signing of a bill that allows some illegal immigrants to serve on county central committees — one of a number of bills signed to benefit those who entered the country illegally.

“These bills are not just symbolic wokeness, this is a fundamental redefinition of who gets to be elected to office in California, and they’re starting small but this is absolutely the first step,” DeMaio told Fox News.

The bill, was one of a number of bills that Newsom’s office described as “expanding the state’s humane immigration policies by protections and support for immigrants” and included a law ending the use of “alien” to describe non-citizens.

Included was a bill that amends California election code to allow what Newsom’s office described as “aspiring citizens” to be appointed and elected members in a county central committee. Proponents have specifically mentioned “DREAMers” or recipients of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) — which protected illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children from deportation.

The bill says it will “permit a person who is not a United States citizen, but who would be eligible to register to vote if the person were a United States citizen, to serve as a member of the committee.”

Those committees are governing bodies of county parties and involves budgetary matters and other business at county level for those parties.

“This is a election that’s on the official ballot that every voter receives, so illegal immigrants’ names will be printed on ballots with all the other offices, all the way from president to school board,” DeMaio said.

He claimed it was part of a bigger push to get illegal immigrants on ballots, and said that in other parts of the state there had been successful pushes to get them on to elections for school boards.

“Clearly this is a pattern and this is not going to stop with this bill Newsom signed,” he said.

“They want to normalize the practice of illegal immigration and that’s what they’re doing by changing words — words have meaning.”

The governor also signed legislation identifying attacks on migrants due to their immigration status as hate crimes and affirming protections for unaccompanied migrant children.

Substitute teacher shortage has Inland school districts scrambling for solutions

Though the Governor and Sacramento Democrats gave school districts $5 billion to make up for the loss of education due to the crazy ending of schools and learning for 18 months, they money does not matter.  There are NO teachers to teach what we have, now.

“A shortage of substitute teachers this school year has left Inland districts scrambling for educators to fill K-12 classrooms each day. Without bountiful pools of guest educators to use in a pinch, school officials have had to think resourcefully to ensure students have an adult to lead instruction.

The coronavirus pandemic undoubtedly changed the landscape of substitute teaching, officials say, sending longtime guest educators down a different career path this fall.

Real teachers do not want to tech sex, bullying, hate for America and racism—that is not teaching, it is indoctrination.  So they go to honest jobs instead.  The kids understand this—government school enrollment is down about 6% and in some schools absenteeism is around 30%–the kids prefer video games to destructive adults

Substitute teacher shortage has Inland school districts scrambling for solutions

With unprecedented teaching vacancies, district officials continue to search for permanent solutions

By Brian Whitehead, The Sun, 9/24/21 

Adrienne Vollmer became a substitute teacher a decade ago to be with her kids all day.

Dorothy Bailey became one three years ago to give back.

In 2021, the two Moreno Valley Unified educators are among a disappearing breed.

A shortage of substitute teachers this school year has left Inland districts scrambling for educators to fill K-12 classrooms each day. Without bountiful pools of guest educators to use in a pinch, school officials have had to think resourcefully to ensure students have an adult to lead instruction.

The coronavirus pandemic undoubtedly changed the landscape of substitute teaching, officials say, sending longtime guest educators down a different career path this fall.

Vollmer and Bailey are among those who stayed.

“I’ve always respected the teaching profession and respected teachers because they contributed so much to my life when I was younger,” Bailey said. “I never forgot that. Eventually, I became an educator and administrator, and when I retired, I wanted to give back what was given to me.

“Substitute teaching,” Bailey continued, “was a way I felt I could do that.”

Added Vollmer: “One thing we all had to remember, and personally, I did, is that the students still need us, now more than ever.”

The Communications Workers of America Local 9588 represents about 650 substitute teachers in San Bernardino and 285 in Rialto, negotiating their wages, working conditions and other daily necessities.

Teresa Hunter, a union leader, said recently myriad factors spurred by the pandemic contributed to the current shortage of substitutes.

“Many teachers have told me that having never had this life experience of having to leave everything you know, your occupation, to stop cold and have to stay in that space for a year and a half or so, they have a different perspective now,” she said. “You have now changed how you want to spend the rest of your life.”

A number of substitute teachers lost family members to COVID-19, Hunter said.

Some substitutes, she added, lost their own battles with the disease.

“A lot of us know each other, and the ones that did not survive, it became known to the community of guest teachers,” Hunter continued. “That had an impact. Most of us, we had a different thought when we first entered the pandemic, and now our outlook on life has changed. We did not expect that.”

Moreno Valley Unified is one Inland district that has boosted daily and long-term pay for substitute teachers to entice those on the fence about taking jobs.

On a recent school day, 70 of the 176 teacher absences in the Riverside County district went unfilled, Superintendent Martinrex Kedziora said. In such an instance, district officials, county Office of Education managers, school principals and administrators, and other substitutes adjust their daily schedules to help.

Ingenuity abounds in the region.

“There’s a lot of strategic thinking, logistical thinking, in trying to figure out how best to fill spaces,” Kedziora said. “We need to make sure there’s someone in the classroom that students can depend on being there and also take care of them.”

Kyley Ybarra, assistant superintendent of personnel services for Riverside Unified, said out of the 719 substitute teachers in the district’s system, more than half have yet to pick up a job this school year.

As a result, the district averages up to 35 unfilled positions a day.

Before the pandemic, Ybarra said, rarely did Riverside Unified have an unfilled post.

“We did not think (filling positions) would be as hard as it is,” she added, “but we knew there would be hurdles.”

With unprecedented teaching vacancies, district officials are searching for permanent solutions.

Since the California Department of Education now requires substitutes only have a college degree, Riverside Unified officials have connected with graduate students at local universities to expedite them through the substitute system, Ybarra said.

In all, the district has placed about 125 student teachers in classrooms this school year.

Moreno Valley Unified also is actively recruiting alumni who have graduated college and live in the community, Kedziora said.

Job fairs have been scheduled, too.

“We’re doing some things we haven’t done before to try to be creative,” Kedziora added. “We know we have to try every method to get people for our positions, especially since everybody is trying to get people.”

Marcus Funchess sees a light at the end of the tunnel.

The assistant superintendent of human resources for San Bernardino City Unified said recently finding substitutes has always been challenging, but between the fallout of the pandemic, the need to quarantine teachers who test positive for the virus and a smaller pool of substitutes from which to draw, this school year “is very, very different,” he said.

“I’ve never seen it like this before.”

Before the pandemic, San Bernardino City Unified had upwards of 1,000 substitute teachers at the ready, Funchess said.

A third of those subs did not return this fall.

While some substitute teachers became full-time teachers over the past year, Funchess said, most left the profession for one reason or another.

The San Bernardino school district presently is soliciting candidates around town. Those driving near the 215/210 freeway interchange can see a billboard advertising opportunities to sub. EDJOIN, the popular education job board, is another resource, Funchess said.

“It won’t be an overnight process,” he added, “but we believe we can overcome this over time.”

San Bernardino City Unified needs about 350 substitutes daily, Funchess said, and whereas the district filled close to 100% of daily teaching vacancies pre-March 2020, that fill rate has hovered around 85% this year.

By December, however, the district expects to see better fill rates based on the recruiting strategies in place now.

Until then, Funchess said, there’s a way for the community to help.

“This is a very challenging time for all school districts,” Funches said. “I would ask for those in the educational field, those in the community, to be patient as school districts work to solve these complicated issues. I believe we can do it, but we need everyone’s patience, we need everyone’s support.

“Teachers need your support,” Funches added, “and district personnel and officials need your support.”

Bay Area businesses hit hard by broken supply chain and port disarray

California business, and the nation’s business is in a mess.  Both the ports in the Bay area and Los Angeles cannot get the cargo ships in, unloaded and out in a timely fashion—they are tied up for days or weeks before being unloaded.  That adds to the cost of the items—and causes the shortage in the items.

“But, those winery clients tell Portocork that they’re faced with a raft of other shortages. 

“They said, ‘Hey look, I can’t bottle. I don’t have glass or, I can’t bottle. I don’t have labels or I don’t have capsules.’ And. a lot of these products come from Europe or China,” said Mowe.

As a result, the company is good shape for now but cork shortages could become a major issue for Portocork in November. 

“We don’t see the situation getting any better. We do not see the end where things will be improving,” said Mowe. 

This is true throughout the world’s broken supply chain. 

“So it actually impacts everybody from the top and all the way to the consumer,” said Blount.”

My suggestion is if you something in the future and see it today, buy it.  When you need it, it may not be available.  Costco is telling customers there is going to be a shortage of paper towels and toilet paper.  Be prepared.

Bay Area businesses hit hard by broken supply chain and port disarray

By Tom Vacar, KTVU FOX 2, 9/26/21

Fighting the supply chain break down

KTVU’s Tom Vacar reports.

OAKLAND, Calif – The broken worldwide supply chain is affecting everything from apples to zucchini, from toilet paper to tube tops, even from carpaccio to corks, eve as the holiday shopping season looms. 

Two local companies are battling the supply lines and congested ports as best they can.

For more than two decades, Italian Harvest, a small South San Francisco direct importer, has sold artisan, packaged Italian made foods retailed mainly on the west coast. 

Since the company imports only 18 sea containers per year, any significant delay has consequences for the mom and pop operation.

The delays quickly doubled from 6 weeks to more than three months. 

“There was a period in which we were desperately without goods about 3 to 4 to 6 months ago,” said Italian Harvest co-founder John Blount. 

To blunt that delay, over the last year, Italian Harvest has been ordering more than usual, at great cost, to assure that it can fill customer orders. But is still awaiting those containers. 

“Maybe Christmas at this point for those two containers loading in Italy right now. All of a sudden our bills have gone up. The cost of shipping has risen 25 to 30 percent,” said Blount.

At Napa’s Portocork, a major importer of corks for wineries, the company, seeing the port supply chain falling apart, ordered way more corks than needed. long before they were needed. 

“It has not helped the balance sheet because we’re carrying a heck of a lot more inventory than we typically would. But, we’ve did what we had to do to satisfy clients,” said Portocork CEO Dustin Mowe. 

But, those winery clients tell Portocork that they’re faced with a raft of other shortages. 

“They said, ‘Hey look, I can’t bottle. I don’t have glass or, I can’t bottle. I don’t have labels or I don’t have capsules.’ And. a lot of these products come from Europe or China,” said Mowe.

As a result, the company is good shape for now but cork shortages could become a major issue for Portocork in November. 

“We don’t see the situation getting any better. We do not see the end where things will be improving,” said Mowe. 

This is true throughout the world’s broken supply chain. 

“So it actually impacts everybody from the top and all the way to the consumer,” said Blount.

With the holidays now fast approaching, we will be seeing the effects of a broken supply chain and port disarray up close and personal, in stores and online.

The next closest major port, the Port of Los Angeles, is also experiencing its own major backup. Officials there say they a record amount of cargo is being moved through its port.