A disastrous megaflood is coming to California, experts say, and it could be the most expensive natural disaster in history

The hoaxsters and scam artists are at it again.  Now, we are in for a “megaflood”.  Of course they have us on edge with fires, regular floods, earthquakes—and of course the biggest scam, “Climate Change.

As for the megafloods, you have to go deep into the article to find that climate change has nothing to do with this—in fact in 1860-61 we had magafloods in the Sacramento area—before we had cars, planes and air conditioners!  These are natural.

We already have the scam homeless industry, now they want to create a subdivision of the scam climate change industry—this one will cost us billions, for studies, academics, research and phony devices to save us—never mentioning that this floods are natural.

A new study by Science Advances shows climate change has already doubled the chances of a disastrous flood happening in California in the next four decades. And experts say it would be unlike anything anyone alive today has ever experienced.

Daniel Swain, a climate scientist with UCLA and a researcher involved in the study, describes a megaflood as, “a very severe flood event across a broad region that has the potential to bring catastrophic impacts to society in the areas affected.” He said a megaflood is similar to the 1,000-year flash flood events seen this summer in the St. Louis area and Kentucky, but across a much wider area, such as the entire state of California.

Just another grafter wanting to kill the economy.  Instead of taking him seriously, we need to ask him, what is the punchline to this joke.  Remmeber two years ago AOC claimed that in ten years the earth was going to melt away, in 1980 we were told we would have famine by 2000 and wars over food.  Hucksters instead of operating in a tent, now use government to operate.  Sick.

A disastrous megaflood is coming to California, experts say, and it could be the most expensive natural disaster in history

 

By Payton Major, Judson Jones and Brandon Miller, CNN, 8/14/22 

Many Californians fear the “Big One,” but it might not be what you think.

It’s not an earthquake. And it isn’t the mega drought. It’s actually the exact opposite.

A megaflood.

A new study by Science Advances shows climate change has already doubled the chances of a disastrous flood happening in California in the next four decades. And experts say it would be unlike anything anyone alive today has ever experienced.

Daniel Swain, a climate scientist with UCLA and a researcher involved in the study, describes a megaflood as, “a very severe flood event across a broad region that has the potential to bring catastrophic impacts to society in the areas affected.” He said a megaflood is similar to the 1,000-year flash flood events seen this summer in the St. Louis area and Kentucky, but across a much wider area, such as the entire state of California.

These massive floods, which experts say would turn California’s lowlands into a “vast inland sea,” might have previously happened once in a lifetime in the state. But experts say climate change is increasing the likelihood of these catastrophic disasters, causing them to occur more like every 25 to 50 years.

Climate change supercharges heavy rain events, making flash floods occur more regularly, as has been noted several times this summer in Eastern KentuckySt. Louis, and even in California’s Death Valley National Park.

California is prone to these floods from atmospheric rivers naturally, and major floods from them have happened before – but climate change is upping the ante, and millions of people could be impacted.

The study said atmospheric rivers could become consecutive for weeks on end, like seen in this animation. Xingying Huang, one of the authors of the study, made this loop, which illustrates the water vapor transportation and potential precipitation accumulation at selected time slices during the 30-day scenario.

The area with the most destruction would be the Central Valley of California, including Sacramento, Fresno and Bakersfield, the study’s authors project. The Central Valley, roughly the size of Vermont and Massachusetts combined, produces a quarter of the nation’s food supply, according to the US Geological Survey.

A flood with the size to fill this valley has the potential to be the most expensive geophysical disaster to date, costing upwards of $1 trillion in losses and devastating the state’s lowland areas, including Los Angeles and Orange counties, according to the study.

That would be more 5 times the cost of Hurricane Katrina, the current costliest disaster in US history.

“Such a flood event in modern California would likely exceed the damages from a large magnitude earthquake by a considerable margin,” the study showed.

This study is the first phase of a three-part series studying the effects of a future megaflood event in California. The next two phases are expected to be released in two to three years.

“Ultimately, one of our goals is not just to understand these events scientifically, but it’s also to help California prepare for them,” Swain said. “It’s a question of when rather than if (the megaflood) occurs.”

It’s happened before. It will happen again, but worse, warns scientists

Over 150 years ago, a strong series of atmospheric rivers drenched the Golden State, causing one of the most exceptional floods in history following a dry spell that had left the West parched for decades.

Communities were demolished in minutes.

It was the winter of 1861-1862 and a historic megaflood transformed the San Joaquin and Sacramento valleys into a “temporary but vast inland sea,” according to the study. Some areas had up to 30 feet of water for weeks, obliterating infrastructure, farmland, and towns.

Sacramento, the new state capital at the time, was under ten feet of debris-filled water for months.

The catastrophe began in December 1861, when nearly 15 feet of snow fell in the Sierra Nevada. Repetitive atmospheric rivers dropped warm rain for 43 days thereafter, dumping water down the mountainous slopes and into the valleys.

Four thousand people lost their lives, one-third of the state’s property was destroyed, a quarter of California’s cattle population drowned or starved, and one in eight homes were a complete loss by floodwaters.

In addition, one-fourth of California’s economy was obliterated, resulting in a state-wide bankruptcy.

Swain warns a megaflood like this will happen again, but worse and more frequent.

 “We find that climate change has already increased the risk of a (1862) megaflood scenario in California, but that future climate warming will likely bring about even sharper risk increases,” the study warns.

Many of today’s major cities with millions of residents are built directly on top of the ancient flood deposits, Swain added, putting far more people in harm’s way.

About 500,000 people lived in California in 1862. Now, the state’s population is over 39 million.

“When this (flood) occurs again, the consequences would be wildly different than they were back in the 1860s,” Swain said.

Climate change increases the amount of rain the atmosphere can hold and causes more water in the air to fall as rain, which can lead to immediate flooding. Both are and will continue to occur in California.

The new study shows a rapid increase in the likelihood of week-long, recurring strong-to-extreme atmospheric rivers during the cool season. An atmospheric river is a long, narrow region of heavy moisture in the atmosphere that can transport moisture thousands of miles, like a fire hose in the sky. They usually bring beneficial rainfall to drought-prone regions like California but could quickly become hazardous with a warming climate.

Historically these winter atmospheric rivers dump feet of snow in the Sierra Nevada, but as climate warms, more of the snow will fall as rain. Instead of melting slowly over time, it all runs off, piles up, and floods immediately.

With a neighbor like the Pacific Ocean, California has “an infinite reservoir of water vapor offshore,” Swain added.

California’s mountainous terrain and wildfire risk make it especially vulnerable to flooding. Lingering burn scars from wildfires can create a steep, slick surface for water and debris to flow off. With wildfires becoming larger and burning more area thanks to climate change, more areas are susceptible to these debris flows.

Although models show this megaflood is inevitable, experts say there are ways to mitigate excessive loss.

Why climate change hits some communities harder than others

“I think the extent of (megaflood) losses can be significantly reduced by doing certain sorts of things to revamp our flood management and our water management systems and our disaster preparedness,” Swain said.

Huang, a project scientist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research and a researcher involved in the study, said everyone can make a small effort in combating climate change.

“If we work together to decrease future emissions, we can also reduce the risk of extreme events,” Huang said.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. DAVID WALDEN says

    I read this article (MEGAFLOOD) from another source several days ago. I thought it was nothing short of STUPID – to suggest that a flood may happen over the next 40 years. OK, I predict that sometime in the next 40 years, people will get smarter, show they have a brain.

    “A new study by Science Advances shows climate change has already doubled the chances of a disastrous flood happening in California in the next four decades

  2. Not “Science”, but Science Fiction…and a horror movie meant to scare. BOO!

  3. John the Patriot says

    Wow! This is bigger than the melting of the Arctic Ice Pack that is predicted by 2013 where all the ice will melt, never to come back, and raise sea levels to six feet in coastal cities! I have got to get to higher ground before 2013 and even HIGHER GROUND before the megaflood. I wonder if the megaflood will happen before 2013? What if the Arctic Ice melt and the megaflood both happen in 2013? WE ARE DOOMED!

  4. Nothing like predicting a disaster 49 years down the road. Many of today’s readers will be dead and gone, or have forgotten all about it.

    Wow, is right. When is it we are supposed to get the next massive meteorite impact? Or the Yellowstone volcano? I’m setting up a schedule, choosing which day and time I will worry about which disaster. I’ve given up on the hairspray-hole-in-the-ozone-layer, the drowning of Manhattan and polar bear extinction,. SO passe’

    Now I have three days open to worry about the megaflood, the meteorite, and Yellowstone. The other four days are devoted to the green grid failure. Pretty sure about that one, unless the powers-that-be suffer an attack of common sense.

    Oops, forgot the death of the oceans. Ted Danson predicted over ten years ago that this would happen in ten years. Ted should know.

  5. oops, typo. Should have said 40 years

  6. Notice this guy Swain truthfully says the warmer temperatures (he calls it climate change) will suck up more water vapor which will fall in the form of rain or snow. One has to wonder why he isn’t proposing then, that 1) Oroville Dam be repaired to correct for the stupid government engineering mistakes made years ago to help corral the water, and 2) advocating for the construction of the dams the Californians voted for YEARS ago that were nixed by Brown and Newsom in favor of a train. The collection of the water would help prevent the floods to which he refers, and save it for periods of time during which it is needed, and could also create, and this is a good one, additional electrical power to power all the electrical vehicles which will otherwise be sitting in garages as they can’t get power from wind and solar. BTW for at least the last 70 years SoCal has been planning for such floods with the massive cement riverbeds to the sea.

    He sees a problem, but has no idea how to correct for it, other than to scream, and offer ‘reduce emissions’. What a bunch of blinkin’ idiots. They have been spoon fed that crap since they were in diapers, and that is the only thing they know. Climate scientist my ass. He’s a fool; UCLA should fire him for being a moron. Of course, there seem to be a lot of them there.

  7. Richard Wahl says

    Africa had a 500 year drought long before industrialization. The middle East had a 200 year drought long before industrialization. Does anyone think that it gets warm in a drought? Oh my. They go silent, when you mention the facts of life. Seriously. Those facts short circuit their brains. It is funny to see.

  8. Read the article and knew the writer was a very ignorant indoctrinated “professional student” with no life’s experience… I’m a CA Native and I was child during the 1955 flood in Northern CA, but was very aware of the 1964 flood. Has anyone driven HW 101 and seen the markers posted through the Avenue of the Giants marking how high the Eel River had risen? That flood was devastating to Northern California at that time. Now, I live in Sacramento County and see the housing built in Natomas and next to the Sac & American Rivers….Money talks. I’m just waiting for another change (not man made but Mother Nature) when we have a very wet winter, periods of Tule fog, and snow that melts when the warm rains come. It will be blamed on man -made climate change and those of us who are considered “Climate Deniers” and warned the current generation might not even be around, but when it does happen, those feeling floods are just a myth will feel Mother Nature’s ability to destroy.

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