AB 540 (2002) Promotes Illegal Aliens Taking Seats in California Colleges

One of the last things Gray Davis did to harm the good people and students of California was to sign AB 540 in 2002—to assure law breakers, illegal aliens can take college seats belonging to honest students, paid for by honest parents.  If your child does not get into the college of their choice in California, could it be the AB 540 unstated QUOTA of illegal aliens is the reason?

Santa Barbara Cal SOAP helps prepare low-income, first-generation junior high and high school students for college by offering tutoring, campus tours and workshops.

The Scholarship Foundation of Santa Barbara provides free financial-aid advising for all students in Santa Barbara County.

Samantha Alvarez, the organization’s program advisor, said a total of $8.76 million in scholarships were given to more than 3,000 students in 2016.

How do they get around calling the scholarships, quota’s and programs illegal alien assistance?  By call it help for “first generation college goers” makes it sound nice and warm.  Just a good use of language to get us to support discrimination and abuse of honest students and taxpayers.

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Local Immigrant Students Are Front and Center at AB 540 College Night

12th annual program is geared to providing resources about college-level education for undocumented students

By Brooke Holland, Noozhawk, 1/30/17

The hallway at La Cumbre Junior High School was lined last week with community nonprofits and resources available to help local immigrant students learn about higher-education options.

Families and students browsed the tables, picking up flyers and packets filled with information about college admission and the application process.

The school theater housed more than 30 attendees at the 12th annual AB 540 College Night, a two-hour event geared towards providing resources about college-level education for undocumented students in the U.S.

AB 540 — which was installed in 2002 — allows qualifying students, including undocumented immigrants students, the right to enroll in a California public college or university and pay in-state tuition fees, according to the law.

The event aimed to offer informational resources and a supportive community, said event organizer Cuca Acosta.

“You are not alone,” Acosta said to the crowd. “You are part of the community. If things change, we are going to support you.”

At the time of the event, the ink was barely dry on a pair of executive orders that President Donald Trump signed last week, which call for planning to begin for a new wall on the United States southern border and a crackdown on illegal immigration.

Trump’s executive order that temporarily bans immigration to the U.S. from seven countries and indefinitely banned Syrian refugees from entering the U.S. was not signed at the time of the event.

Santa Barbara County has approximately 108,080 immigrants, and more than 39,500 of them are undocumented, according to an estimate from CAUSE.

Educational leaders also attended the event.

Santa Barbara Unified School District Superintendent Cary Matsuoka and district board members Laura Capps and Ismael Ulloa were among the crowd.

“We have a great deal of support from the community,” Acosta said.

Attendees learned more about the California Dream Act application process, which allows some undocumented students to apply for and receive state-based financial aid and institutional scholarships, according to the law.

The California Dream Act, also known as Assembly Bill 130 and Assembly Bill 131, allows eligible AB 540 student to apply for and receive financial-aid resources.

Students can receive private scholarships provided through public universities, state-administered financial aid, university grants and community college fee waivers, according to the law.

“With President Trump, there’s uncertainty with families worried that everything will go away — in California, the California Dream Act is not going away,” said Dos Pueblos High School counselor Silvia Pereira. “We feel confident our California legislation and governor at the time is supportive.”

Pereira has 23 years experience as a counselor and has been at Dos Pueblos for 13 years.

She provided translation at the event and has been involved with AB 540 College Night since the first year.

“We are here to continue to support our undocumented families and students to help them achieve college,” Pereira said.

In addition to presentations, a handful of community nonprofits and resources were available.

“The goal is for the community to understand the available resources,” Acosta said.

Services ranging from student programs to counseling services were available.

Santa Barbara Cal SOAP helps prepare low-income, first-generation junior high and high school students for college by offering tutoring, campus tours and workshops.

The Scholarship Foundation of Santa Barbara provides free financial-aid advising for all students in Santa Barbara County.

Samantha Alvarez, the organization’s program advisor, said a total of $8.76 million in scholarships were given to more than 3,000 students in 2016.

Santa Barbara City College, the Adsum Education Foundation, AB 540 Coalition of Santa Barbara, UC Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Unified School District and the Carpinteria School District also sponsored the event.

Visit the AB 540 Coalition of Santa Barbara site to learn more about additional services within the county.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.