AB 562: Hopes to Stop Janet Napolitano Corruption—Won’t

What is wrong with this picture?  UC Janet Napolitano got caught hiding $175 million of tax dollars from State Auditors, the State Legislature, the Governor and the Board of Regents.  Was she fired—or is $175 million slush fund too small to care about?  Nope, she is still in charge of the assuring free speech is killed and bullying defended on her campuses.

Instead the Legislature passed a bill to make it a crime, with a penalty of $5000, if caught.  If she had been fired, on the spot, the law would not be needed—everyone would know it was wrong.  AB 562 is just window dressing, to pretend they are protecting our money—they are not.

“The California state legislature amended Assembly Bill 562 after a state audit report showed the University of California Office of the President inappropriately screened surveys UC campuses submitted to the state auditor about the quality and cost of services UCOP provides.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law Monday that would fine individuals who knowingly interfere with state audits.

Assembly Bill 562, which takes effect Jan. 1, adds on to current law and states that anyone who obstructs a California state audit with intent to deceive or defraud will be fined up to $5,000.”

Why can’t government be trusted?   AB 562 and Napolitano.

brown vs napolitano

California strengthens law against audit interference after UCOP dispute

By Sharon (Yu Chun) Zhen, Daily Bruin,  10/3/17

The California state legislature amended Assembly Bill 562 after a state audit report showed the University of California Office of the President inappropriately screened surveys UC campuses submitted to the state auditor about the quality and cost of services UCOP provides.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed a bill into law Monday that would fine individuals who knowingly interfere with state audits.

Assembly Bill 562, which takes effect Jan. 1, adds on to current law and states that anyone who obstructs a California state audit with intent to deceive or defraud will be fined up to $5,000.

Under the new law, a state agency also has to create a commission for the purposes of allowing the California state auditor to access specified documents.

California state legislators amended the bill in June after a state audit report in April showed administrators from the University of California Office of the President intentionally interfered with the California state audit process regarding campuses’ perspectives on programs provided by UCOP.

The report added UCOP screened the campuses’ survey responses and that statements that were initially critical had been removed or revised to be more positive.

UCOP responded in a statement that the office only helped facilitate the process of finding individuals who were best positioned to answer particular questions.

Current law regarding state audits requires any state or local entity to grant auditors access to specified documents such as records of bank accounts, reports and files, and makes it a misdemeanor for any individual who refuses access.

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.