Allowing 400 lower-income homes has some Rancho Palos Verdes residents worried

Rancho Palos Verdes is an upscale, single family community.  Now it could be the first California city to be made into a slum courtesy of Newsom and his Sacramento Democrats.

“Adding nearly 650 low-to-moderate income housing units in Rancho Palos Verdes has some residents and City Council concerned about traffic and density issues in the city.

At its Tuesday, Oct. 19 meeting, the Rancho Palos Verdes City Council discussed its response to a state law that requires periodic assessments of housing needs by region.

The Southern California Association of Governments, a joint powers authority comprising 191 cities that is in charge of this area’s Regional Housing Needs Assessment, released a plan for local housing needs earlier this year.

Note that the decision to do this was NOT made by the city council, but by an unelected regional body.  No need to vote for council members any more—this slum housing created by bureaucrats will make that worthless.  You will not be able to vote for those who make these decisions.  That is called a totalitarian nation.

Allowing 400 lower-income homes has some Rancho Palos Verdes residents worried

The city’s plan to do its part to ease Southern California’s housing crisis has residents concerned about increased traffic and density

By Michael Hixon, Daily Breeze,  10/21/21 

Adding nearly 650 low-to-moderate income housing units in Rancho Palos Verdes has some residents and City Council concerned about traffic and density issues in the city.

At its Tuesday, Oct. 19 meeting, the Rancho Palos Verdes City Council discussed its response to a state law that requires periodic assessments of housing needs by region.

The Southern California Association of Governments, a joint powers authority comprising 191 cities that is in charge of this area’s Regional Housing Needs Assessment, released a plan for local housing needs earlier this year.

SCAG used a complicated formula that includes affordability, income, home values, proximity to transit and jobs among other factors to determine how many new homes each city within the region should allow.

But finding adequate sites within RPV to meet the state’s housing allocation is a challenge, said Ken Rukavina, the city’s Director of Community Development at the meeting Tuesday.

All cities and counties must prove they have “land that is appropriately zoned for residential development affordable to all income categories,” according to a draft Housing Element update prepared by BAE Urban Economics.

According to Matt Kowta, managing principal at BAE, the city, to reach that allocation, would need to allow builders to construct homes for 647 housing units across the city. Kowta said approximately 400 of those units would be considered lower-income units.

There are around 50 candidate sites around the city that could be rezoned to allow for an increase in residential development, Kowta said at Tuesday’s meeting.

“We do recognize that a large portion of the sites that have been identified are non-vacant sites that would require either infill or redevelopment to get those new units and per state law,” said Kowta, adding it would eventually be up to the private sector to develop the housing.

Rukavina said they are not concentrating the potential new housing in one area.

“We really need to spread it out, which is why we looked at all commercial areas in the city for potential mixed-use, so that we don’t eliminate the commercial aspects but allow for housing,” Rukavina said.

Councilmemeber David Bradley said the City Council has not recommended the report yet, which will up for review in early February. He said the city is trying to access what it can do and had been “backed into this” by the state.

“Here are the possible places within the city, in a city that has no good places to put (647) units,” Bradley said.

About a dozen residents who spoke at the meeting had the same sentiment.

Traffic was an issue, especially on Western Avenue. The City Council agreed Western Avenue should not take the brunt of the RHNA allocation.

“I think it is really ludicrous to ruin such a beautiful area, such a quaint area, losing the character, and trying to approach something that it’s not really feasible for the area,” said RPV resident Francesco Funiciello.

“To add more traffic is just insanity,” added Adriana Peacock.

Anita Garner said it would “result in irreversible damage to our neighborhoods.”

 “The city of Rancho Palos Verdes should look into taking legal action against this unrealistic mandate of 647 units,” Garner said.

Mayor Eric Alegria said the city has gone through the formal appeal process of its RHNA allocation in regards to the number of units required and was denied, as were other jurisdictions. The city had requested a 54-unit reduction.

“We’ve taken that step and we are also in the process of assessing state or legal options that are available to municipalities,” Alegria said.

At Tuesday’s meeting, the City Council decided to remove Miraleste properties from the potential sites as well as properties along Palos Verdes Drive South, due in part to land movement, according to city spokesperson Megan Barnes.

In comparison, for other smaller South Bay cities such as Hermosa Beach and Manhattan Beach, the RHNA requirement is 774 and 558, respectively. In Redondo Beach, the number is 2,490 and in Torrance, the South Bay’s largest city, the allocation is 4,939.

Rukavina said at Tuesday’s meeting the city continues to accept public comments through Nov. 4.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. Otis Needleman says

    But how do “they” plan to force people to build these units?

  2. Welcome to California.

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