Bankrupt L.A. Looking to Create “Dockless Bike sharing”: Role of Government

Los Angeles has a $10 billion and growing unfunded pension liability.  The city has the worst streets in the nation per a national survey, dams could be created by the potholes in the streets and the government schools graduate 45% of it students with “D” averages.  Yet the city wants to devise new rules to get you out of your car and onto a bike.

“City Councilman David Ryu introduced two motions Tuesday that he said would improve transportation options in Los Angeles by driving down the cost of bike rentals and creating more car-sharing opportunities.

Ryu wants to create a dockless bike-sharing system for residents to use through a phone app to find and unlock nearby bicycles and drop them off anywhere they are allowed, with no docking station or kiosk required.

His other motion would allow an owner to rent out his or her personal vehicle through a web-based app for short-term use, as the Los Angeles Municipal Code does not currently have a framework to regulate peer-to-peer car sharing.”

We already have AIRBNB.  If the private sector wanted to create a duplicate firm, but renting cars instead of homes, it would.  Why should government—which in L.A. heavily regulates housing rentals, be free to start a company to do the same for cars?  Why is L.A. facing economic collapse?  Not paying attention to the basics.

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Councilman Seeks to Create More Car-Sharing and Reduce Cost of Bike Rentals

LA WEST MEDIA,  10/3/17

 

City Councilman David Ryu introduced two motions Tuesday that he said would improve transportation options in Los Angeles by driving down the cost of bike rentals and creating more car-sharing opportunities.

Ryu wants to create a dockless bike-sharing system for residents to use through a phone app to find and unlock nearby bicycles and drop them off anywhere they are allowed, with no docking station or kiosk required.

His other motion would allow an owner to rent out his or her personal vehicle through a web-based app for short-term use, as the Los Angeles Municipal Code does not currently have a framework to regulate peer-to-peer car sharing.

“City Hall talks a lot about building an economy and a city that is more dynamic and sustainable. This is, quite literally, where the rubber meets the road,” Ryu said.

“Dockless bike sharing would allow more people to bike instead of drive, and bring bike sharing to communities where docked systems aren’t feasible,” he said. “Peer-to-peer car sharing would allow more people to live without a car, increasing transportation options, reducing greenhouse gases and creating a healthier Los Angeles.”

Other cities in the U.S. and China have experimented with dockless bike sharing and had “haphazard rollouts of programs that led to bikes being left in a fashion that cluttered the public right of way,” according to Ryu’s bike motion. City staff would be instructed to conduct outreach to dockless bike- sharing companies to develop a pilot and also study ways to mitigate the risk of bikes cluttering the public right of way.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.