Bill Would Lower Threshold for Local Tax and Bond Measures

California government can not spend money fast enough—or get enough money to spend, buy votes, political power and donors for future campaigns.  Now there is a move to use 55%, instead of 2/3 to pass massive tax and bond measures.  Apparently passing 80% of the scams presented to us is not enough.

“Under a constitutional amendment proposed by Assemblywoman Cecilia Aguiar-Curry (D-Winters), a two-thirds supermajority would no longer be required for bond or special tax measures. Instead, tax hikes or bond measures for transit, water, parks and low-income housing projects could pass with just 55%.

“Local communities know their priorities best,” says Aguiar-Curry. “This constitutional amendment will offer an important tool for local leaders to support projects and determine how to pay for them.”

This is one of the reason the middle class is fleeing California—folks can no longer afford to pay taxes and live a quality life in the former Golden State.  Either we say NO to all tax and bonds—or find a great home—costly less than half of a garbage California home, in Texas.

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Bill Would Lower Threshold for Local Tax and Bond Measures

California County News,   02/26/2017

One California lawmaker is trying to make it easier for local governments to raise taxes.

Under a constitutional amendment proposed by Assemblywoman Cecilia Aguiar-Curry (D-Winters), a two-thirds supermajority would no longer be required for bond or special tax measures. Instead, tax hikes or bond measures for transit, water, parks and low-income housing projects could pass with just 55%.

“Local communities know their priorities best,” says Aguiar-Curry. “This constitutional amendment will offer an important tool for local leaders to support projects and determine how to pay for them.”

According to the assemblywoman, nearly 80% of measures put before local voters since 2001 that required a two-thirds supermajority garnered more than 55% but failed because of the lofty threshold. Critics say local economies and infrastructure suffer greatly as a result. A similar reduction of the voter approval threshold occurred for school bond measures in 2000. They now require sanction from 55% of voters.

Aguiar-Curry isn’t the only one trying to reduce voter approval requirements. Sen. Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco) has proposed a similar amendment that would apply only to transportation projects.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.