Calif. Farm Bureau rolls out opposition to split roll ballot initiative

The November ballot will have a union sponsored measure to create higher property taxes for industrial and commercial property owners.  That means fewer employees and wage increases will be lowered.  By how much?  The State estimates that if the Split Roll tax passes, government will transfer $12.5 billion from the private sector to government.  That would allow higher wages and benefits for government employees (unions members) and lower wages and fewer jobs for the 94% of non government California workers who do not belong to a union.

If approved, the initiative would account for a $12.5 billion tax hike on commercial properties held across the spectrum – from major distribution centers to small businesses.

The initiative would not directly affect the property tax on farms, but would apply to any ag-related improvements made to the property that include some of the basics of farming – from barns to dairies to vineyards and orchards, the California Farm Bureau Federation said.

“It’s unusual for the Farm Bureau to oppose a measure at this early stage,” California Farm Bureau president Jamie Johansson said in a statement Thursday. “But our board of directors is very concerned about the impact this initiative would have on rural California.”

Read that carefully—the cost of food will also go up as the taxes go up.  This will also make California products less competitive than those from Free States, like Arizona, Texas and the Mid-West.  Can you spell suicide?

Calif. Farm Bureau rolls out opposition to split roll ballot initiative

Alex Tavlian, The Sun,  20/21/20 

A proposal to roll back Proposition 13 for commercial properties saw a new opponent emerge on Thursday: farmers.

The California Farm Bureau Federation announced Thursday it would

The prospective initiative, which creates a so-called “split roll” on property taxes, is not set to hit the ballot until November.

If approved, the initiative would account for a $12.5 billion tax hike on commercial properties held across the spectrum – from major distribution centers to small businesses.

The initiative would not directly affect the property tax on farms, but would apply to any ag-related improvements made to the property that include some of the basics of farming – from barns to dairies to vineyards and orchards, the California Farm Bureau Federation said.

“It’s unusual for the Farm Bureau to oppose a measure at this early stage,” California Farm Bureau president Jamie Johansson said in a statement Thursday. “But our board of directors is very concerned about the impact this initiative would have on rural California.”

The split roll initiative does not repeal Proposition 13’s cornerstone provision – a cap on property taxes at 1 percent of the assessed value of the property – for any type of property.

However, Proposition 13 locks in a property’s assessed value when ownership changes or under other specific conditions, such as new construction or additions to a property.

Under the split roll initiative, commercial property would be eligible to be reassessed every three years to the current market value.

For family farms that have not changed ownership in multiple generations, a market value reassessment could prove excessively costly.

“At a time when families are already struggling to make ends meet and provide healthy, farm-to-fork options for their families, we simply cannot afford the largest property tax increase in California history,” said California Business Roundtable president Rob Lapsley.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. This is great news. Too bad they could not do it a month ago.

    Welcome on board, now get out and promote your position.

  2. Richard Colman says

    Suppose a commercial property has an annual property tax of $100,000 a year, If the split-roll plan becomes law, it would be easier to raise that $100,000 property tax to $200,000. If an owner of commercial property has to pay $200,000 in property tax (instead of $100,000), the property owner may be forced to sell the property, raise the rent on tenants, or go out of business. The split-roll plan is a job killer.

  3. And thye wonder why smart people and businesses are fleeing the State. Recall Pretty Boy!

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