California could use more Pat Brown and less Jerry Brown

If you are going to have bad government, do it for well intentioned reasons.  That was the eight years of Pat Brown.  The 16 years of Jerry Brown was revenge for being a rich kid and wanted everyone to be poor.  His main goal was to harm the schools, clog the roads, give water to fish, not people.  He loved making it expensive to drive a car or live in the State.    He won the Brown v. Brown war.  People are fleeing California, just as Jerry wanted.

“”Rent a Bed for Only $1,200 a month in San Francisco!” read the headline on the blog post a few weeks ago. It was touting the latest trend in minimal dozing, at least in San Francisco and L.A.

“You’ll get a hand-built, high-end bunk bed complete with your own flat screen TV and night light, together with a community to socialize with, for just $1,200 a month in San Francisco. That’s a little more than the average monthly rent of an apartment in the rest of the country. What more can you ask for?’

Not much, you might say, if you were a fan of former Gov. Jerry Brown and his “small is beautiful” mantra. His two nonconsecutive eight-year runs in the governor’s office followed his father Pat’s own two terms. The two Govs. Brown were not policy colleagues but policy rivals in the most intense sense of the word. They waged a battle for the soul and direction of the largest, most populous state in the union. At this date, and to the state’s misfortune, Jerry appears to have won.”

Today Pat Brown would be called a reactionary, right wing extremist by Newsom and his buddies.  To me, he will always be a socialist Governor who never understood policy or people.

California could use more Pat Brown and less Jerry Brown

by Noemie Emery, Washington Examiner,  7/9/19 

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Rent a Bed for Only $1,200 a month in San Francisco!” read the headline on the blog post a few weeks ago. It was touting the latest trend in minimal dozing, at least in San Francisco and L.A.

“You’ll get a hand-built, high-end bunk bed complete with your own flat screen TV and night light, together with a community to socialize with, for just $1,200 a month in San Francisco. That’s a little more than the average monthly rent of an apartment in the rest of the country. What more can you ask for?’

Not much, you might say, if you were a fan of former Gov. Jerry Brown and his “small is beautiful” mantra. His two nonconsecutive eight-year runs in the governor’s office followed his father Pat’s own two terms. The two Govs. Brown were not policy colleagues but policy rivals in the most intense sense of the word. They waged a battle for the soul and direction of the largest, most populous state in the union. At this date, and to the state’s misfortune, Jerry appears to have won.

To understand the two men, one has to look at their backgrounds, which tend to explain a great deal. Pat (governor from 1959-1967) was the heir to World War II and the boom that came after it; Jerry (governor from 1975-1983 and 2011-2019) was heir to the Vietnam War and the bust that came after it. Pat was a builder, an optimist, and an expansionist, who built his state into the most populous one in the union. He was a friend and supporter of the middle class and the suburbs, building the state highway system, the water system, the highways, and schools.

In contrast, the “Trend Democrats” (as Michael Barone calls Jerry Brown, Gary Hart, and their cohort), thought that their states and the country had been built up enough already. Devout environmentalists, they thought the main job of politics was to defend the Earth from those who lived on it. They despised the suburbs and malls of the past quarter century, and, as Barone says, “felt comfortable in calling for less growth, less exploitation of resources, and were quite blind to the problems — the economic frustrations caused by diminished upward mobility” that resulted.

It became far more expensive to run a business in California. The cost of buying or building a house settled at about 133% of the national average. Today, much of California’s middle class has left or is leaving, seeking opportunity in places such as Austin, Houston, Boise, and Tucson. And those who go to California to seek their fortune may have to settle for a bunk in a house in a fairly large city. At least the bunk is high-end, and hand-built!

The $2,400-per-month bunk bed in the heart of one of California’s most feted (and decaying) big cities is the ultimate and inevitable end of Jerry Brown politics, not unlike the seminary cell and the unfurnished flat he once lived in. It is at the opposite end of the great scale from the suburban tract houses his father’s policies had once helped to build.

Now, with the state in distress and the populace fleeing to Atlanta, Jacksonville, Salt Lake, and elsewhere, it may be the time to call a halt to this nonsense, and look back toward the Pat Brown era once again.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.