California Republican Party: Ends Being Fiscally Responsible/Party Protecting Workers

The people of California are voting with their signatures as to be a registered Republican or not.  The vote totals are in and the GOP has lost.  In just the past three years the Republican Party of California has lost 403,000 registrants, per the Secretary of State’s office.

Two main reasons for this:

  1. Prop. 14, the top two election system mandates that the Republican and Democrat parties NOT nominate any candidates for office.  Why register as a Republican when the Democrats, and vice versa, can decide who is on the ballot?  In 2012 and 2014 there were 28 legislative races on the November ballot with only ONE Party on the ballot.

  2. A few years ago it was the GOP in Sacramento that gave the Democrats the votes to increase vehicle taxes by over $3 billion a year.  A few months ago, again it was GOP votes that created a $1.7 billion tax, per year, on your private health insurance policy to fund “free” health care for illegal aliens and $270 million for transportation (not a typo)

The Party of fiscal responsibility to many has become Democrat Lite—since the Ryan budget deal a few months ago the national debt has gone up $1 trillion.

Yup, 400,000 have decided they did not want to register with a Party that does not act on their values.  Now the same Party leaders that demanded conservatives support the Democrat (though Republican registered) Neel Kashkari for governor, Mitt Romney and John McCain for President, refuse to endorse Donald Trump for president. This is the election where the grassroots of the GOP are demanding answers from its leaders and consistency.  If the GOP does not immediately turn around I will make an easy prediction:

After this election a mass number of Trump supporters and other conservatives will drop their Republican registration—the Party needs to unify behind Republican principals—if not it could go the way of the Know Nothing Party.

Photo courtesy of secretlondon123, flickr

Photo courtesy of secretlondon123, flickr

California Republican Party: End Being Fiscally Responsible/Party Protecting Workers

Stephen Frank, California Political News and Views Editorial, 5/9/16

The Republican Party in California has been proud of its efforts to provide quality education for children.  Unlike the Democrat Party, we believe that all children are different and each needs a specialized education model.  To some it is a government school, other like home schooling, private schools and charter schools.  The funding of education of the public in California is based on government schools and the controlling unions work hard to keep the kids hostage in failed schools—for the money.

During the recent California Republican Party convention Charles Munger, Jr. as chair of the CRP Initiatives Committee pushed through GOP support for an $18 billion bond.  Though very well educated in finance and government, his report showed the cost to be $9 billion—he did not include the cost of interest, another $9 billion.  This is the bond measure created not by educators—but by the unions and construction firms—the beneficiaries of the bond.

The Initiative Committee also did not note to the delegates that under State law, if any State money is used, ONLY union members (people forced to pay bribes in order to work)  In California there are approximately 2.5 million union members, most of whom work for government.  This is a State of 39 million people.  In the private sector it is about 6%.  So, 100% of the people pay back the bond, while 94% of the people are BANNED from working on the new facilities due to State mandated Project Labor Agreements.  From Bureau Labor Statistics, see here.

This may be the first time the California Republican Party turned its back on the workers of California to the benefit of the unions.  Since 2014 the unions have been a significant donor to the CRP—in October, 2014 the SEIU gave $500,000 to the CRP, for instance.

The issue is simple—will shining new buildings and energy savings facilities mean anything to the QUALITY of education?  With the new buildings come the failed Common Core, “restorative justice”(which allows druggies, bullies and classroom disruptors to stay on campus and in the classroom—feel safe?)  LAUSD gives 40% of a grade based on “socio-economic” cultural traditions—translated that means 40% of the grade is based on your race.  No amount of new buildings, even $18 billion worth, will fix the internal education problems.  And the public see’s this, especially Republicans.

The fact is, policy has consequences.  Recently, it took Republican votes in the Assembly and State Senate to pass a $1.7 billion tax on your private health insurance.  The money went to finance illegal aliens health care and $270 million for transportation (huh, what does transportation have to do with health insurance—but that is what the GOP’ers demanded, in part, for their vote.)

What are the consequences?  Thanks to the Munger promoted and financed Prop. 14, why be a registered Republican—this allows Democrats to choose Republican candidates for the November ballot and vice versa.  In 2012 and 2014 there were 28 races on the November ballot with only one Party for the office.  Under these circumstances, why register Republican—and in the 22 districts with NO Republican on the ballot, why vote or be a Republican.  How bad is that?  Thanks to Prop. 14 the GOP has atrophied so much around the State that it is a real possibility that the November, 2016 ballot will not have a Republican running for the U.S. Senate—and in 2018, it will get worse.

  1. The GOP votes for tax increases
  2. the GOP support unions over worker rights
  3. Like the Democrats, the GOP is not being honest about the cost of bond measures
  4. GOP votes finance illegal aliens health care

How bad is it?  Below are the raw numbers from the California Secretary of State—over 400,000 fewer registered Republican voters, with 2.6million more eligible voters.  Last year I presented a resolution to put the California Republican Party on record for the repeal of Prop. 14—it was voted down.  It almost looks like political assisted suicide—what do you think?

One issue unites Cruz and Trump supporters, who are the vast majority of the Republicans in California:  they believe the leadership (“establishment” “Washington cabal”) needs to be changed—that they represent the special interest, not the grassroots, families or jobs in America.  I expect that after the November election, regardless of the results, there will be a major and vocal discussion of the future of the Republican Party, its leadership and direction.  Please use this op-ed as your opportunity to start the discussion.

January 5, 2016  4,7,67259 registered Republicans  see here.

January 3, 2012   5, 170,592  registered Republicans

October, 5, 1999      5,126, 768  registered Republicans

From October 5, 1999 to January 3, 2012, in raw numbers the California Republican Party GAINED 44,176 registered voters

From October 5, 2012 to January 5, 2016, in raw numbers that California Republican Party LOST 403,333

January 5, 2016   17,259,413  eligible voters

October 5, 1999 14,653,221 eligible voters.

With 2.6 million more eligible voters, the California Republican Party has 403,333 FEWER voters in the same time period.

With the changes, we have gone from 35% of the voter registration in 1999 to 27.76% at the start of this year.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.