City of Los Angeles: We Protect Illegal Aliens and Native Born Criminals

In Los Angeles, if you are an employer, you are not allowed to ask a job applicant if they are a criminal, have been arrested and/or convicted of a crime.  When you make your job offer, at that time, you are allowed to ask if the applicant is a criminal and has been arrested and/or convicted of a crime.  This after you have spent lots of money and time finding the “right” person for the job.

Then , if you decide not to hire a criminal, the City of Los Angeles demands a reason for this decision—as if your business is owned by government.  If you own a restaurant, a bakery, a small business (with ten or more employees) do you want a burglar embezzler, a thief working for you?  The City is demanding an explanation—time consuming.  Then what happens if the criminal is gay, a person or color or a woman—will the City of Los Angeles charge you with discrimination? It could.

“The measure would institute a policy known as “fair chance” or “ban the box,” requiring employers to remove check boxes or questions from job forms that ask about an applicant’s criminal record.

If approved by the City Council, employers with 10 or more workers and city contractors would be prohibited from asking about criminal history until a conditional job offer has been made.

An employer that ultimately decides against hiring a person after learning about his or her criminal record would need to provide a justification for why the job offer is being rescinded.”

eric garcetti

Hiring a criminal? You’ll be barred from asking in LA

Posted by Debbie L. Sklar, My News LA,  11/30/16

A proposed ordinance that would bar employers in Los Angeles from asking job applicants to reveal their criminal records during the initial stages of the recruitment process will go before the City Council Wednesday.

The measure would institute a policy known as “fair chance” or “ban the box,” requiring employers to remove check boxes or questions from job forms that ask about an applicant’s criminal record.

If approved by the City Council, employers with 10 or more workers and city contractors would be prohibited from asking about criminal history until a conditional job offer has been made.

An employer that ultimately decides against hiring a person after learning about his or her criminal record would need to provide a justification for why the job offer is being rescinded.

City officials point to statistics from the National Institute of Justice that show the likelihood of a job offer goes down 50 percent if an applicant has a criminal record.

The measure is part of a national movement aimed at giving formerly incarcerated people a better chance at obtaining employment. Representatives of groups like A New Way of Life, LA Voice, Homeboy Industries and All of Us or None have spoken in favor of Los Angeles adopting the ban at City Council committee meetings.

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.