Colman: CALIFORNIA REPUBLICANS ARE FLUNKING OUT

Thanks to sexual predators in the State Assembly, the Democrats no longer have a super majority—not because of what Republican did, but because of the abuse by Democrats of women.  The State Senate has two Democrats under investigation for harassing women—neither is willing to do the right thing and resign—why should they, the GOP is in no position to demand it.

On other issues, Republicans can affirm support for education.  This can be done by supporting charter schools, especially in areas where the traditional public schools are not properly educating pupils.  Charter schools are public schools that compete with traditional public schools, which have strong teachers’ unions and provide job security through tenure (whether tenure is deserved or not).  Competition makes everything, including schools, better. 

In the area of higher education, the Republicans can offer low tuition to students attending the University of California (any campus), the California State University system, and community colleges. 

We win by showing the people of California how Democrat policies’ have created crime, poverty, low wages and a crumbling education system.  Want a better life?  Vote GOP—but we have to be winning to campaign on those issues.  If not, November, 2018 will see the Democrat super majority still in the legislature.

Photo courtesy of DonkeyHotey, flickr

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CALIFORNIA REPUBLICANS ARE FLUNKING OUT

By Richard Colman, California Political News and Views,  1/3/18

 

Vince Lombardy said it best:  “Winning isn’t everything, it’s the only thing.” 

And the only thing California Republicans are doing is losing most elections. 

It time for the Golden State’s Republicans to start winning — even if winning means making some compromises or making some philosophical changes. 

In 1952, two Republicans sought the presidential nomination:  Sen. Robert Taft (R-Ohio) and Dwight (Ike) Eisenhower, a hero of World War II. 

Taft, a conservative, an isolationist in foreign policy, and a bit of a libertarian was clearly the favorite of most delegates to the Republican convention. 

Eisenhower was a centrist.  He liked balanced budgets.  He was not going to expand Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal nor was he going to repeal it. 

Enormously popular, Eisenhower stood behind the policies of rebuilding Europe and Japan.  He believed that isolationism would lead to another world war.  Having seen the horrors of World War II, Eisenhower did not want to see any more conflicts. 

To obtain the 1952 Republican nomination, Eisenhower had to fight for it.  Many Republicans, even though they admired Taft, wanted a winner, especially after losing five straight presidential elections:  1932; 1936; 1940; 1944; and 1948. 

Once Eisenhower became the presidential nominee, he easily won the presidency in 1952 and was re-elected in by an ever bigger margin in 1956. 

For reasons that are not clear, California Republicans would rather be “correct” on the issues rather than win elections. 

Currently, California’s Democrats control the state legislature.  In recent years, the Democrats have held supermajorities (a two-thirds majority or more) in both the State Senate and the State Assembly. 

In a state with plenty of non-Caucasians (such as people of Asian-Pacific ancestry, Latinos, blacks, Middle Easterners, and others), the Democrats keep winning — with ease — statewide political races.  There is not one Republican who currently holds a statewide office (such U.S. Senator, governor, lieutenant governor, controller, treasurer, attorney general, or insurance commissioner). 

So what should Republicans do?  They need to win elections by appealing to basically centrist voters, especially women. 

On controversial social issues like abortion and gay marriage, Republicans can easily say that such decisions should be left to the individual.  Giving more freedom to individuals is consistent with Republican philosophy. 

On other issues, Republicans can affirm support for education.  This can be done by supporting charter schools, especially in areas where the traditional public schools are not properly educating pupils.  Charter schools are public schools that compete with traditional public schools, which have strong teachers’ unions and provide job security through tenure (whether tenure is deserved or not).  Competition makes everything, including schools, better. 

In the area of higher education, the Republicans can offer low tuition to students attending the University of California (any campus), the California State University system, and community colleges. 

Fifty years ago, tuition at the University of California (again, any campus) was $180 a year.  Today, that tuition is $12,000 (or more) a year.  Tuition does not cover expenses for books, computers, room, and board. 

Republicans should support a tuition of $2,000 a year, which would make the University of California affordable for families of moderate and low income.   For the State Universities (like San Francisco State), an annual tuition of $1,000 a year would be appropriate.  Community colleges could have a fee of $200 a year. 

If California wants to be competitive with other states and foreign countries, a sound educational system is vital.  For students who want to study science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, there should be scholarships that would make education totally free if the student completes his degree. 

Another issue for Republicans is jobs.  California should offer tax breaks for firms that invest in new products, in new jobs, and in activities that offer enhancement of productivity (like robots).  Here is how such a tax break could work:  For each $100,000 invested, the firm’s tax bill would be reduced by $100,000.

There are other matters California Republicans can address, such as the control of the Democratic Party by high-priced public employees.  When public employees are overcompensated, there is less money for education and tax cuts. 

The Democrats in California are a political monopoly.  Monopoly is a form of dictatorship. 

If California’s Republicans start talking about economic growth, jobs, and opportunity to get ahead, then the Democratic monopoly can be broken.

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.