Colman: HOME SWEET HOME IN CALIFORNIA — BUT FOR HOW LONG?

Will Sacramento cause the collapse of housing values?  Should a Governor in Sacramento be able to demand and enforced laws for affordable housing, high density housing and be the last and only word in the creation of new housing?  If so, why have a city council or allow people in Lompoc vote for a city council, if Sacramento is going to determine the key policies for a city?

An ADU can be built on a person’s private property.  While the ADU may be used to house an elderly relative, the ADU might also be occupied by other people — people who use illegal drugs, commit crimes, put children into schools that subsequently become overcrowded, take up parking spaces, add to traffic congestion, and produce fires.  ADUs might, ultimately, lead to lower property values for every homeowner. 

The State of California is forcing local communities to build more housing even if a given city has no room for additional housing.  California is acting like a place where respect for private property and community standards is disappearing. 

It’s time for the people of California to stand up to autocratic rule coming from elected and unelected officials in Sacramento.”

Personally, I support the creation of “granny flats”.  But the rules for these must come from the City Council, not the State Legislature. This is an issue we need to watch and control.  Sacramento is working hard to take over decisions of local government.  Either fight back at the polls or move to a Free State.  Your choice.

affordable housing

HOME SWEET HOME IN CALIFORNIA — BUT FOR HOW LONG?

By Richard Colman, California Political News and Views,  7/31/17

“Our house is a very, very fine house with two cats in the yard, life used to be so hard . . .”

–“Our House” by Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young (1970).

What can make life beautiful?  Answer:  Living in a nice house on or near the California coast — very possibly a house with a garden, nice yards, and a swimming pool.

That ideal California house is in jeopardy — serious jeopardy.

Real-estate developers, construction unions, banks, insurance companies, architects, and others want to ruin one’s home.

In such California cities as Encinitas, Newport Beach, Orinda, Lafayette, and other cities, the State of California is demanding the construction of Accessory Dwelling Units (ADU), which are sometimes called “granny flats” or “second units.”

Encinitas is a costal town about 25 miles north of San Diego.  Newport Beach is a wealthy enclave in Orange County.  Orinda and Lafayette are tony suburban towns 15 to 20 miles east of San Francisco.

An ADU can be built on a person’s private property.  While the ADU may be used to house an elderly relative, the ADU might also be occupied by other people — people who use illegal drugs, commit crimes, put children into schools that subsequently become overcrowded, take up parking spaces, add to traffic congestion, and produce fires.  ADUs might, ultimately, lead to lower property values for every homeowner.

The State of California is forcing local communities to build more housing even if a given city has no room for additional housing.  California is acting like a place where respect for private property and community standards is disappearing.

It’s time for the people of California to stand up to autocratic rule coming from elected and unelected officials in Sacramento.

 No person has an automatic right to a house.  To obtain a house, a person usually has to work hard, save money, and obtain a loan.  After buying a home, the owner should not have to spend time and money defending his property from government intrusion.

Community standards would not permit a homeowner to install a 50-foot high flashing neon sign saying something like “Harry lives here.”

No homeowner should have to suffer the indignity of having government order a high-rise building next door.  And that building next door may produce noise and foul odors.

Local communities, not higher levels of government, should have control over zoning, building heights, and housing density (houses per acre).  But the autocrats in Sacramento want to jeopardize what a homeowner has sought to achieve — the pride of being a homeowner and living in peace.

For how more months or years, will Californians be able to say:  “Our house is a very, very fine house?”

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.