Colman: LAND-GRAB OPPONENTS PRESS AHEAD

My hometown of Simi Valley has a two story limit for commercial, industrial and apartment buildings.  If SB 827 becomes law, the State of California will force us to have eight story apartment building an NO parking mandated.  Imagine living in an eight story apartment, with all the families and not a single parking space mandated.

Under SB 827 if the State determines your town does not have enough “affordable” housing, it will mandate the development of them—where the STATE wants, not the community.  Traffic, schools, parking, density, crimes, all will be negatively affected.  Once it passes, the Leftists in marin, Beverley Hills and San Mateo are going to scream—among their multi-million homes will be slum housing forced on them by government.

Specifically, SB 827 would prevent local communities from interfering with housing construction within one-quarter mile of a frequently used bus route or one-half of a mile of a train station.  In the bill’s designated zones of control, a local community’s regulations would be barred in such areas as building heights, number of housing units, and provisions for parking spaces. 

     The sponsor of SB 827 is State Senator Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco).  The bill’s co-sponsor is State Senator Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley). 

This is the Democrat Party—the State controls your community.

Jerry Brown state of the state

LAND-GRAB OPPONENTS PRESS AHEAD

By Richard Colman, California Political News and Views,  2/20/18

 

     Opponents of a State of California plan to grab the land of local communities are pressing ahead. 

     At a meeting in San Francisco on Feb. 17, approximately 25 people showed up to state their unequivocal opposition to State Senate Bill 827 (SB 827). 

     SB 827, if enacted, would allow the State of California to control a local community’s land near a railroad station or a bus route. 

     Specifically, SB 827 would prevent local communities from interfering with housing construction within one-quarter mile of a frequently used bus route or one-half of a mile of a train station.  In the bill’s designated zones of control, a local community’s regulations would be barred in such areas as building heights, number of housing units, and provisions for parking spaces. 

     The sponsor of SB 827 is State Senator Scott Wiener (D-San Francisco).  The bill’s co-sponsor is State Senator Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley). 

     SB 827 is designed to alleviate a shortage of so-called affordable housing in California. 

     The bill is opposed by the Sierra Club and the League of California Cities. 

     There is a debate over whether state-mandated housing plans will lead to more affordable housing.  In an opinion piece in The Wall Street Journal on Feb. 12, Paul Kupiec and Edward Pinto, both of the American Enterprise Institute, argued that setting aside new housing units to “. . . sell or rent at below-market prices to low-income households . . .” will ultimately ” . . . increase the cost of housing for everyone else.” 

     To take a somewhat simplified example, suppose a governmental agency required the construction of 10 new housing units, four of which were to be given away free.  If each housing unit were to cost $500,000, the developer would need $5 million to cover his total costs.  (Ten multiplied by $500,000 equals $5 million.)  If four housing units were to be given away free, then, to cover his costs, the developer — whether a for-profit entity or a nonprofit organization — would need to generate a total of $5 million from the remaining six units.  Each of the six remaining units would cost $833,333. 

The question can asked:  How many housing buyers who are not low-income individuals can afford to pay $833,333 for a new home? 

Under the tax law passed by Congress and signed into law on Dec. 22 by President Donald Trump, federal tax deductions for new homes are to be limited.  The tax law allows $10,000 to be deducted for state-local taxes (such as property taxes).  The law also limits the deduction for mortgage interest to loans not exceeding $500,000.  If a buyer of a new home costing $833,333 were to take out a loan equal to 80% of $833,333, the loan would be for $666,667 — an amount in excess of $500,000. 

According to The Wall Street Journal piece, the concept of “inclusionary zoning” (plans to have a certain amount of new housing set aside for low-income people) “has been implemented by 886 communities, nearly 90% of which are in California, Massachusetts and New Jersey.” 

According to the editorial in the Berkeley Daily Planet (Jan. 6), State Senator Wiener in a 2014 election campaign received 50% of his campaign contributions from such interests as real estate, real-estate law, architects, interior design, the building trades, technology companies, and attorneys for technology companies. 

The group that met in San Francisco on Feb. 17, is in the process of creating a name for itself and devising strategies to oppose SB 827. 

The group, which appears to be growing in size, will meet again on Mar. 10.

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.