Colman: WHERE’S MY MARGARET THATCHER?

While Dr. Colman asks “Where is My Margaret Thatcher”, many of us ask where is our Ronald Reagan?  President Trump is one of a kind.  Few have his guts to take on the Deep State.  Unlike the Democrats he is for the Free Market and willing to take on the crony capitalists.  He is taking on the big corporations that abuse us in the media, on the Internet and firms that take jobs overseas.

Thatcher stood for free markets, an assertive nationalism, less government regulation of the economy, limits on the welfare state, and hard work.  Hard work is reminiscent of the Queen Victoria age (1819 to 1901), when Britons, if they wanted something, were expected to work hard and not depend on government for assistance.

In 1982, when Argentina tried to take control of British territory near Argentina, Thatcher sent her military to retake the occupied land.  The land was the Falkland Islands, which are close to Argentina.”

Between Thatcher and Reagan, the world had great leaders.  We have Trump today—but in five years we will need another great leader.

WHERE’S MY MARGARET THATCHER?

By Richard Colman, Exclusive to the California Political News and Views,  10/23/19   

California is broke.

 The exultation over the state’s current $21 billion budget surplus is a mirage.  No one knows for sure, but the state has unfunded pension liabilities of between

$400 million and $1 trillion dollars.  These liabilities are mostly for the state’s public employees and public school teachers.

 California residents who are not American citizens get access to the 10-campus University of California and other educational institutions.  Also, these residents qualify for other benefits like housing allowances, food assistance, and health care.

 There is no need to be cruel.  No one inside California should be allowed to go hungry.  Some temporary, low level of assistance might be appropriate.  People who receive government money must be required to work.

 So what should California do?

 California needs discipline.  And no one, in recent times, has stood for discipline more than Margaret Thatcher, who was prime minister of Great Britain from 1979 to 1990.

 When Thatcher took over the prime minister’s job, strikes in Britain were prevalent, garbage was piling up (sometimes 20 feet high) in the streets, and the British pound was becoming worthless.  Jobs were hard to find.

 When Thatcher first ran for prime minister, the Conservative Party, of which Thatcher was the head, had a slogan:  “Labor is not working.”  The slogan was directed against Britain’s other major party, the Labor Party, which traditionally has been a socialist party.  (In Britain, “labor” is spelled “labour.”)

Thatcher stood for free markets, an assertive nationalism, less government regulation of the economy, limits on the welfare state, and hard work.  Hard work is reminiscent of the Queen Victoria age (1819 to 1901), when Britons, if they wanted something, were expected to work hard and not depend on government for assistance.

In 1982, when Argentina tried to take control of British territory near Argentina, Thatcher sent her military to retake the occupied land.  The land was the Falkland Islands, which are close to Argentina.

From the end of World War II to the 1990’s, California represented growth and opportunity.  There were jobs.  Governors like Earl Warren, Goodwin Knight, and Edmund G. (Pat) Brown had to prepare for 10,000 new arrivals a week.  California built freeways, water projects, and a top-notch system of higher education.  The crown jewel of the educational system was the multi-campus University of California.  (At one point, the university’s Berkeley campus, had nine Nobel laureates as faculty members.) Hollywood and the aerospace industry were booming.  So was agriculture.

During to so-called golden years (1946 to 1999), California became the place to live.  Along the coastal regions, the climate was mild, and there was no snow.  Southern California seemed to have year-round spring and summer.  For those who liked skiing, there were resorts at Lake Tahoe (in Northern California) and Lake Arrowhead (in Southern California).  For golfers, the Palm Springs area offered a great climate, especially from October to March.

In the 1970’s, to the 1990’s, Silicon Valley (about 40 miles south of San Francisco) emerged as a worldwide technology center.  Such firms as Apple, Google, Facebook, Oracle, and Intel emerged.  For skilled technology workers, there were plenty of jobs.

 Around the year 2000, things started to go sour in California.  Millions of low-income people moved in.  Housing prices started to skyrocket.  Freeways became congested with traffic.  The public school system, once one of the best in the nation, became overwhelmed with pupils who did not know English.

 Today, California resembles a Third World country.  Twenty percent of the state’s residents live in poverty, and another 20 percent live at a level close to poverty.  These statistics come from Dan Walters, the dean of the state’s newspaper columnists and a journalist for almost 60 years.  For many years, Walters wrote columns for the Sacramento Bee.  A few years ago, Walters retired from the Bee, and now his columns appear on the website <www.calmatters.org>.

 In such major cities as Los Angeles and San Francisco, thousands of homeless people live on the streets.  Some of these vagrants are hooked on illegal drugs.

 It’s time to clean up the mess in California. 

 The system of higher education (the community colleges, the California State University, and the University of California (U.C.) needs some assistance.  Fifty years ago, tuition at a U.C. campus was $180 a year.  Now, the tuition is over $12,000 annually.  Education should be regarded as an investment, an investment that will be repaid by graduates who earn more money than those who only finish high school.  At the college and university level, there should be special tuition waivers for students who graduate with degrees in science, technology engineering, and mathematics.

 One idea with exploring is encouraging certain California residents to leave the state.  Currently, the state’s population is about 40 million, more than all of Canada.

 If millions of California residents leave, there will be no need for the massive housing and transportation programs that the state government wants to create.  Think how much nicer — and affordable — California would be with 20 million to 30 million residents.

 Current plans call for more tax increases in California.  Some ideas call for increasing the state sales tax by one percentage point or more.  California already has the nation’s highest sales tax and the nation’s highest gasoline tax.  Sales taxes hurt low-income people and retired people on fixed incomes very hard.  With fewer people, California might be able to reduce — not increase — taxes.

 To bring back glory to California, it’s time for the kind of discipline exemplified by Margaret Thatcher.

 Thatcher’s discipline turned Britain around.  Someone with a similar outlook should be able to restore California to greatness.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.