Confused Guv Brown: Need Tax Dollars to Propagandize Citizens With Junk Science

Last week our very confused Guv announced that climate change was going to cause LAX (Los Angeles Airport) to be under water! His people had to back track on that stream of consciousness. Al Gore has said the polar bear is gone, though we have more now than ever before—glaciers are going to melt—but they are growing. Junk Science, used to control jobs and citizens needs money for the people to understand, per Guv Brown. This is the man that calls a $10 billion cash deficit a surplus.

California has the highest taxes in the nation, the most poverty, AB 32 killing jobs, but Brown has the answer. He wants to use tax dollars meant for education, roads and public safety to promote junk science—so we can lose more jobs and make the California Depression.

global warming eco green

 

Investing in climate change is a long-term sales project, says governor
by Gene Beley, Delta Correspondent, Central Valley Business Times, 5/25/14

•  The need to capture the public’s imagination

•  “We’re tying all this together in an integrated plan to reduce the carbon emissions”
Climate change requires different political values and hasn’t yet captured the public’s imagination, California Gov. Jerry Brown told the University of California Gianni Foundation of Agricultural Economics Climate Change conference in Sacramento last week. The next day the San Francisco Chronicle ran a page one article telling how fruit growing in the Central Valley is in jeopardy as the tule fog seems to be slowly disappearing over the past 30 years, according to a UC Berkeley study.

In 1980 there was an average of 37 foggy days in Fresno, but this past winter, there were only two foggy days. Stone fruit trees, like the peaches, plums, apricots and nectarines that are a major industry in the Valley need the cooling fogs of winter.

“This is really a complex set of pressures that aren’t that easy to talk about in a sound bite or bumper sticker or one liner,” Mr. Brown said. “Nonetheless, the people as a whole have to be able to support a series of moves over a long period of time. This is a path that must be pursued today, the next day, and the next 100 years. It is something as of yet to capture the public imagination. They are still gripped in denial.”

““There will be an inevitable increase in sea level. That increase in sea level will have impacts on water quality and agricultural practices in exposed areas,” Mr. Brown said. “We we’ve got to get to work on it. We’ll take action to reduce climate change and then action to adapt and change the infrastructure, use of water, crops, and everything else.”

He added that he hoped people in the audience would come up with some good long-term solutions.

“Of course we have AB 32, which is the most far-reaching measure to deal with climate change of anyone in the United States,” he said.”

He told his audience that the temperature is rising and the soil is dryer, making easier for wild fires to break out and rage uncontrolled, much like last year’s Rim Fire that was one of the largest in the state’s history.

“We’re seeing that now. We have twice the forest fires in California this year than normally. It means that there is constant danger in urban areas, grasslands, and agricultural areas,” Mr. Brown said. “The fire season is 70 days longer than historically, so that means we need fire crews on all the time.”

The fifth report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and Assessment, recently released, says climate change bodes ill for states like California, the governor noted.

“There will be an inevitable increase in sea level. That increase in sea level will have impacts on water quality and agricultural practices in exposed areas,” Mr. Brown said. “We we’ve got to get to work on it. We’ll take action to reduce climate change and then action to adapt and change the infrastructure, use of water, crops, and everything else.”

He added that he hoped people in the audience would come up with some good long-term solutions.

“Of course we have AB 32, which is the most far-reaching measure to deal with climate change of anyone in the United States,” he said.

AB 32 states that the California Air Resource Board “shall prepare and approve a scoping plan for achieving the maximum technologically feasible and cost-effective reductions in greenhouse gas emissions from sources or categories of sources of greenhouse gases by 2020.”

The scoping plan, approved by the CARB Board in December 2008, provides the outline for actions to reduce greenhouse gases in California. The approved scoping plan indicates how these emission reductions will be achieved from significant greenhouse gas sources “via regulations, market mechanisms and other actions.”

Mr. Brown said there are now 70,000 electric vehicles in California and the toughest building standards. “We’re tying all this together in an integrated plan to reduce the carbon emissions,” he said, adding that carbon emissions in California are close to 450 million tons a year with the goal is to reduce them to 425 tons by 2020. “By the time we get to 2050 we’ll have reduced it to something like 75 tons,” he predicted.

The governor notes that there are 32 million cars in California that travel 332 billion miles a year. “We’re on track to add another 25 billion miles by 2020,” he continued, “a huge demand for gasoline and oil products, unless we reduce the miles traveled and substitute renewable energy in place of fossil fuels.”

He said while there is a transition, it won’t happen overnight.

“That many vehicles and miles are almost a billion miles every day. It’s going to take political will, investment, and support of the people of this state and the country. And California is not acting alone. We’re signed agreements with Washington, Oregon, British Columbia, and will meet with Mexico in July to seek he same kind of agreements to work on collaborative efforts to reduce the heat trapping gasses,” he said.

Mr. Brown said agriculture is a key area of climate change focus. “We’re working through the conflicts of agriculture north and south, fish habitat, and the total system. It’s not like one side gets the wind. We’re in a interdependent kind of system where we’re both competitive and independent,” he said.

“It’s not us against them. It’s us in the environment taking account of the complex demands of being part of something called the eco-system. You can be sure we will be steadfast in California to do everything we need to do to make agriculture work and use our water as carefully as possible,” the governor concluded.

Outside, in front of the California Museum Auditorium, before the Governor entered the building, approximately a dozen people from the Center for Biological Diversity were walking the sidewalk chanting and singing anti-fracking messages like Climate Leaders Don’t Frack.

“His power to ban fracking presents a great opportunity to fight climate change,” said Hillary Aidun, the organizer for the frackers from the Center for Biological Diversity in San Francisco.

The below 14 minute, 57 second video opens with that scene, as well as Governor Brown’a keynote speech.

California Governor Jerry Brown speaks to U.C. Giannnini Foundation on climate change May 19, 2014 from Gene Beley on Vimeo.

 

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.