Confused Guv Brown Thinks “Gun Restraining Order” Will Stop Terrorists—NOT A JOKE (But Brown Is)

Why does the extremely confused 77 year old Guv Brown think that a terrorist or illegal alien is going to throw away their guns if they are issued a restraining order? This is no more than a publicity stunt by someone confused with a press release and real security. Maybe if concealed carry permits were easy to get, there would be fewer domestic types of violence.

As for terrorists and illegal aliens. forget it. Restraining orders are a joke. Deportation, jailing, Gitmo, that is how you stop them. Real vetting of folks coming in from Europe and the Middle East is needed—asking a visa applicant if they are going to blow up something in the United States is a terrible joke—on the American people.

.” “It establishes a process to obtain a legal court order to temporarily reduce those potential acts when we have the warning signs or indications that the person might be at risk for violence,” says Capitola Police Chief Rudy Escalante, who spoke representing the California Police Chiefs Association.

The measure will take effect in January. And even though there’s no evidence the San Bernardino shooters’ family members raised concerns about them, the law is now being looked at in a new light.

Think a terrorist is going to turn in another terrorist? Believe an illegal alien is going to rat on another criminal? This law is a feel good effort for government to pretend it si doing something. Worthless, like most government programs.

Gun

Could New California Law Prevent Mass Shootings?

Ben Adler, Capitol Public Radio, 12/9/15

California law enforcement agencies will get a new tool in January that they hope could prevent mass shootings. The new law is drawing criticism from gun rights advocates, while last week’s San Bernardino shooting has supporters hoping to expand its reach.

The law was written in response to a mass shooting near Santa Barbara in May 2014. A young man killed six people and injured 13 after his parents had warned law enforcement he could be dangerous. Within months, California had a new law allowing family members or law enforcement officials to seek a temporary “gun violence restraining order” against someone they believe could be dangerous.

“It establishes a process to obtain a legal court order to temporarily reduce those potential acts when we have the warning signs or indications that the person might be at risk for violence,” says Capitola Police Chief Rudy Escalante, who spoke representing the California Police Chiefs Association.

The measure will take effect in January. And even though there’s no evidence the San Bernardino shooters’ family members raised concerns about them, the law is now being looked at in a new light.

“If those circumstances existed in the San Bernardino case, then it is possible – if the law was operative – that they could have reported that, and been able to go through a civil process of getting a restraining order and had those guns removed,” Escalante says.

President Obama has called on Americans to speak up if they believe people in their family or community could be dangerous. And Asm. Phil Ting (D-San Francisco) wants to expand the law to include co-workers – and perhaps other groups.

“You have a number of innocent victims who were coworkers of this individual, who hopefully, if they had the tools to protect themselves, they would have been able to,” Ting says.

Gun rights advocates strongly disagree.

“We have a great concern about expanding (the gun violence restraining order) model, because it opens it up to any sort of a frivolous attack on an individual,” says Sam Paredes with Gun Owners of California.

He opposed the original law as unconstitutional. He’s even more worried about expanding it.

“There’s gonna have to be some very close scrutiny to see if it’s being taken advantage of by people with a gripe or a concern or a grudge. It will always be suspect whenever used,” Paredes says.

Gov. Jerry Brown signed the restraining order law last year. But he’s vetoed several other gun control measures. Asked in recent days about the San Bernardino shooting, Brown has said he believes California’s gun laws are sufficiently tough – it’s other states’ laws that are not.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.