Homelessness Jumps In Los Angeles

Mayor Eric Garcetti—the pretender for the White House—has spent and demanded billions to help the homeless.  At the same time he raised the minimum wage, causing loss of jobs and homelessness.  At the same time he promoted high taxes and more regulations, causing more homelessness and loss of jobs.  Garcetti is protecting illegal aliens—taking the jobs of honest Americans and causing their homelessness.

So, it is no surprise that the Garcetti/Democrat policies have caused a jump in homelessness.  Now the City wants to spend more, tax more, regulate more—to help the homeless—which instead will create more poverty and misery as the last of the middle class flees this collapsing city.

“Homelessness in the city of Los Angeles jumped by 20 percent over the last year while the county saw a spike of 23 percent, according to the results of the 2017 Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count released Wednesday.

In the city, the total number of homeless went up to 34,189 and the county number increased to 57,794.

Government needs to stop helping make more homeless—roll back the regulations, taxes and policies—start enforcing laws and then you will see a massive drop in homelessness.  My guess is that it will get much worse before the collapse and then the Times will ask, “how did this happen?”.

eric garcetti

Homelessness Jumps In Los Angeles

The homeless population in the county increased by 23 percent, according to the Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count released Wednesday.

By PATCH SOCAL (Patch Staff), 5/31/17

 

LOS ANGELES, CA — Homelessness in the city of Los Angeles jumped by 20 percent over the last year while the county saw a spike of 23 percent, according to the results of the 2017 Greater Los Angeles Homeless Count released Wednesday.

In the city, the total number of homeless went up to 34,189 and the county number increased to 57,794.

“We didn’t need a homeless count to know what we know, which is that Los Angeles is undergoing a housing and homelessness crisis,” Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said.

The homeless count took place over three nights in January and was conducted by the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority, which saw a record number of volunteers — totaling more than 8,000 — participate.

In light of the higher number of volunteers, the number of homeless may not have gone up, but LAHSA may have just gotten more accurate at counting them, officials said.

“Our numbers are more accurate. People always go back and forth, is it really that homelessness is up by this much? I’m going to assume it is,” Garcetti said at a news conference at LAHSA’s headquarters.

The tally comes as the city and county are investing a record number of funds toward homeless services following the passage by city voters of Measure HHH in November and county voters’ approval of Measure H in March.

Measure HHH is expected to raise $1.2 billion in bonds for the construction of 10,000 units of housing for the homeless, and Measure H will create a quarter-cent sales tax to raise $355 million annually over 10 years for homeless programs.

“Today I am not discouraged at all by this data. We knew well intuitively that the uptick could be perceived,” said county Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas.

“The good news is that we have the capacity for the first time to stand up to it. Imagine how we would feel if there had been no Measure HHH. Imagine how we would look today if there had been no Measure H. This would be a very different conversation.”

The rising cost of housing, along with a housing shortage, was acknowledged by officials as a top cause of the homeless problem. Los Angeles has not built enough housing or affordable housing over the last decades to keep up with the increasing population, making the city one of the least affordable in the nation.

“What we need to double down on is, with the mayor’s leadership and the leadership of the council, making sure that we have a source of revenue for affordable housing, that we have sufficient anti-poverty programs,” said Councilman Marqueece Harris-Dawson.

The count is required to be done every two years by the federal government, but LAHSA went to an annual count last year.

LAHSA is in charge of the count for what is called the continuum of care for the entire county except for Glendale, Pasadena and Long Beach, which conduct their own counts. But the newly released number for the county included the results from those three cities.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.