IBM-San Jose State deal will prepare students for jobs not yet invented

If Warren and Sanders had their way, there would be no IBM—or Facebook, or PG&E or other privately run company.  Instead everything would be run by government—so government will determine where you work, if you work and how you get compensated.  Entrepreneurs would be shunned and outlawed—everybody would be equal.  Just like in Cuba or Venezuela, everybody would be equally poor.

IBM Corp. and San Jose State University have signed a partnership agreement intended to prepare students for careers in emerging technologies like artificial intelligence, blockchain, cybersecurity, cloud computing and others — “some that we know and some that are only now emerging,” university President Mary Papazian said.

The open-ended agreement includes creation of a portal for students, staff and faculty to access IBM teaching and research resources worth $5 million at the outset, establishment of an on-campus technology office and cybersecurity training center, and a skills academy with courses on the skills and ethics that will be required in an evolving digital economy.”

At a time where menial jobs and low skilled jobs are disappearing—and computers and robots are replacing them, this is the type of public/private partnership that is need for the future.  Google is doing a massive retraining job—without the help of government.  Tens of thousands of people will be trained or retrained for the age of technology.

IBM-San Jose State deal will prepare students for jobs not yet invented 

Mary Papazian, president of San Jose State University, and Naguib Attia, IBM’s vice president for global university programs, sign a partnership on Friday, Oct. 18, 2019, to train and retrain

By Jody Meacham, Silicon Valley Business Journal, 10/21/19 

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IBM Corp. and San Jose State University have signed a partnership agreement intended to prepare students for careers in emerging technologies like artificial intelligence, blockchain, cybersecurity, cloud computing and others — “some that we know and some that are only now emerging,” university President Mary Papazian said.

The open-ended agreement includes creation of a portal for students, staff and faculty to access IBM teaching and research resources worth $5 million at the outset, establishment of an on-campus technology office and cybersecurity training center, and a skills academy with courses on the skills and ethics that will be required in an evolving digital economy.

“We’ve set it up in a way that it will become accessible, not just to us, but we hope to our colleagues across the (California State University system) as well, Papazian said.

IBM has three such agreements with eastern universities including the University of Louisville, Hofstra University on Long Island, New York, and the New Jersey Institute of Technology, said Naguib Attia, the company’s vice president for global university programs. He established the program in the Middle East and Africa when he was the company’s vice president and CTO of its industrial sector there.

“AI, our academic initiative program, has given $295 million of software free to world universities, so the $5 million here, they can grab it quickly. We are not going to say stop,” Attia said. “We’re going to say keep going.”

He said the SJSU partnership was hatched a year ago when he first met Papazian. It seemed like an obvious opportunity for IBM, considering the university’s location in Silicon Valley and the company’s Almaden Valley lab, which opened in 1977, just six years after the valley’s nickname was coined.

The region’s tech companies “are paying arms and legs to train and re-skill and up-skill,” Attia said. “This program, you re-skill and up-skill even the people who don’t have funds to pay and this is very, very low cost.”

University spokeswoman Robin McElhatton said the school educates more employees of Silicon Valley companies than any other and said 200,000 alumni live in the area in addition to the 36,000 currently enrolled students and 4,000 faculty and staff.

“We are the pipeline to Silicon Valley,” she said.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.