L.A. May Restrict Who Can Challenge a Marijuana Shop’s City License

In 1998 the people of California voted on Prop. 5, which when passed allowed Indian Casino’s to open up in California.  At the time it was controversial.  Today, there is almost no opposition to the Casino’s.  In 2016 we passed Prop. 64, to allowed “recreational;”  marijuana—it was very controversial.  But starting January 1, 2018, it will be legal in California.  Though many cities and counties are banning the cultivation or sale of marijuana, many more are not only approving it but trying to get the marijuana industry to “grow” in their community.

No, it is not because these communities love to get high—nope—it is about the money.  With CalPERS destroying local budgets, taxes killing families and jobs and creating the highest cost of living in the country, marijuana gives revenues to government—instead of to the gangs (of course many consider government organized crime anyway).

Now, a measure is being proposed in the City of Los Angeles to limit those that can protest the placement of marijuana shops in the city.

“The controversial idea was tucked into draft rules that would lay the groundwork for what is widely expected to be one of the hottest marijuana markets in the country — a burgeoning industry could pump more than $50 million in tax revenue into city coffers next year.

Under the proposed rules, which had been heavily shaped by the office of City Council President Herb Wesson, L.A. would allow appeals only from the business applicants themselves or “occupants, stakeholders, or property owners who reside or own property” within 500 feet.”

Bankrupt L.A. needs the money.

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L.A. May Restrict Who Can Challenge a Marijuana Shop’s City License

KTLA,  10/2/17

Los Angeles might restrict who can lodge appeals when marijuana businesses get city licenses, blocking challenges from people who do not live, work or own property nearby.

The controversial idea was tucked into draft rules that would lay the groundwork for what is widely expected to be one of the hottest marijuana markets in the country — a burgeoning industry could pump more than $50 million in tax revenue into city coffers next year.

Under the proposed rules, which had been heavily shaped by the office of City Council President Herb Wesson, L.A. would allow appeals only from the business applicants themselves or “occupants, stakeholders, or property owners who reside or own property” within 500 feet.

Wesson staffers said that wording was meant to include people who live, work or own property within that 500-foot radius.

Read the full story on LATimes.com

 

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.