LA getting serious about lifting parking requirements in Downtown

Los Angeles is seriously looking at getting rid of “parking minimums for homes, apartments and businesses.  In reality, that means NO PARKING SPACES provided.  The goal of course is to make it difficult for people to live or work in the city without using expensive, time consuming, and unreliable government transportation.  Better yet, do not live or work in the City let the grass and the bikes take it over.

“Across the city, when developers build, they are required to put in a certain number of parking spaces. That number is based on the building’s use—residential buildings, for example, have to have between one and two parking spaces per apartment or condo, depending on the number of bedrooms in each unit.

But where parking minimums have been instituted, they’ve been “an unmitigated disaster,” says Michael Manville, an associate professor of urban planning at UCLA.

“Right now, it’s illegal to build for a tenant who doesn’t care if their car is in the same building with them,” or who doesn’t own a car at all, says Manville, who is a faculty fellow at UCLA’s Institute of Transportation Studies.”

This continues the Manhattanization of Los Angeles.  Expect a rapid decline of business in the area as parking becomes too expensive for the poor or middle class—only the rich will live in L.A.  Thought you should know—looking for an attorney, CPA or business relationship—make sure it is outside of Los Angeles.  Or be prepared to spend hours on a bus.

LA getting serious about lifting parking requirements in Downtown

Downtown could become the city’s first neighborhood to do away with parking minimums 

By Bianca Barragan , LA Curbed,   8/6/19  

Nationwide, it’s estimated that 17 percent of rent goes toward the cost of constructing a parking spot. Shutterstock

Buildings in Downtown LA are likely to get a lot taller. They might also include a lot less parking.

A draft set of development guidelines for Downtown, released by the city in July, is testing the waters for eliminating the requirement that developers put parking in new apartment and condo buildings.

Across the city, when developers build, they are required to put in a certain number of parking spaces. That number is based on the building’s use—residential buildings, for example, have to have between one and two parking spaces per apartment or condo, depending on the number of bedrooms in each unit.

But where parking minimums have been instituted, they’ve been “an unmitigated disaster,” says Michael Manville, an associate professor of urban planning at UCLA.

“Right now, it’s illegal to build for a tenant who doesn’t care if their car is in the same building with them,” or who doesn’t own a car at all, says Manville, who is a faculty fellow at UCLA’s Institute of Transportation Studies.

In order to add the mandated parking, developers, especially of larger projects, often have to add floors of above-ground parking, creating unsightly garages or podiums, or dig underground, which gets expensive.

The rest of us are paying for it. Nationwide, it’s estimated that 17 percent of rent goes toward the cost of constructing that parking spot, as developers pass on costs to tenants.

Parking minimums have been blamed for driving up the cost of housing, but they’re also a detriment to local efforts to combat climate change. The city’s “green new deal” calls on Angelenos to reduce their personal car use by 50 percent over the next three decades. (Though some have argued that timeline is dangerously over-generous.)

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.