LAUSD must change how it allocates space at charter schools

Lets’ be honest. The unions, non-educators, own and control the Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD). This is a district with declining enrollment, crowded schools, failed curriculum, low (real) graduation rates and is in deficit, so far, by $160 million. Parents at several schools are using the State “Parents Trigger Act” to fire ALL the teachers and administrators in their children’s school—and hire qualified folks instead of the union approved (that means the teachers’ pay bribes to a union in order to be in the classroom).

Now LAUSD is making it difficult for charter schools—the one area of success (because unions do not run them and over 90% of the teachers do NOT pay bribes to teach) for the children. It took a court decision to force LAUSD to allow quality education—pity the hundreds of thousands of other students held hostage in failed government schools.

“The court said Thursday L.A. Unified violated a state regulation by allocating space to charters based on the number of classrooms staffed by teachers across the district, according to The Times. The law requires other space — including rooms used for study halls or libraries — to be part of the equation, the court said.

“Counting only those classrooms staffed by an assigned teacher would effectively impute to charter schools the same staffing decisions made by the District,” Liu wrote, according to The Times. “But there is no reason to think a charter school would necessarily use classrooms in the same way that the District does.”

The bad news is that LAUSD is going to REFUSE to abide by the court decision—unions goons at work again.

classroom

LAUSD must change how it allocates space at charter schools

by Debbie L. Sklar, MyNewsLA, 4/10/15

The California Supreme Court has unanimously decided that the Los Angeles school district’s method for allocating space to charter schools may shortchange them out of classrooms.

In a decision written by Justice Goodwin Liu, the state’s highest court said the district’s formula may “undercount” the number of classrooms that charter schools are entitled to and should be replaced with a different method.

But whether the new method would lead to expansions for L.A. charter schools was unclear, , the Los Angeles Times reported. The guidelines laid down by the court contained plenty of room for interpretation, according to The Times. Charter advocates predicted that at least some schools would get additional space, but an attorney for LAUSD said no new charter school classrooms would be required.

The case was based on Proposition 39, which voters passed in 2000. It requires school districts to give charters facilities that are reasonably equivalent to those provided to students in traditional public schools. Charter schools are publicly funded and independently run. Most are nonunion.

The court said Thursday L.A. Unified violated a state regulation by allocating space to charters based on the number of classrooms staffed by teachers across the district, according to The Times. The law requires other space — including rooms used for study halls or libraries — to be part of the equation, the court said.

“Counting only those classrooms staffed by an assigned teacher would effectively impute to charter schools the same staffing decisions made by the District,” Liu wrote, according to The Times. “But there is no reason to think a charter school would necessarily use classrooms in the same way that the District does.”

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

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