New Report Says Schools Should Try To Reopen In Person For Elementary Students

Want an education?  You have to go to school.  Pretending to take a couple of hours per week online with a teacher is not an education, it is an excuse for those not wanting to do their jobs—but want to be paid anyway.

“The new report makes nine recommendations. First, schools should consider that staying closed poses a serious risk to children, especially the most vulnerable children. When possible, districts should “prioritize” full-time, in-person classes for the youngest children in elementary school, and for special needs children. Christakis says that this is because these two groups generally struggle the most with online learning and need the most supervision.

When it comes to mitigating the risks of the coronavirus once schools are open, the report says, adult staff should wear surgical masks, and everyone should have access to hand-washing sinks, soap and water or hand sanitizer. People should practice physical distancing and limiting large gatherings. Cleaning and ventilation are important but not sufficient, the report says. Furthermore, Christakis notes, “deep cleaning, as is currently recommended, is expensive and may or may not really make a big difference.” The report also includes a recommendation that states and the federal government provide funds to schools to safely reopen.

The bottom line is that this will set back students years in their education.  Unlike Newsom who is rich enough to send his kids to an expensive private school that IS open five days a week to educate, the poor, the minorities and the middle class are the big losers.  We will lose a generation of scientists, actors, athletes, teachers and physicians to this government response meant to shut down society and make us subservient to government.  We are allowing this.  Ready to fight back?

New Report Says Schools Should Try To Reopen In Person For Elementary Students

Anya Kamenetz, NPR,  7/15/20 

The National Academy of Sciences report includes an updated review of the evidence from around the world and a set of recommendations on mitigation strategies for the coronavirus in school settings.

This fall, public school districts should prioritize full-time, in-person classes for grades K-5 and for students with special needs. That’s the top-line recommendation of a new report by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine.

The report includes an updated review of the evidence from around the world and a set of recommendations on mitigation strategies for the coronavirus in school settings. It adds to a hefty reading list of back-to-school guidance that now includes comprehensive recommendations from the CDC, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Federation of Teachers and every U.S. state except Kansas. There’s a growing consensus on a few best practices across most of these reports, such as the importance of masking and social distancing.

What stands out from this particular report is its emphasis on collaboration with public health authorities and focus on not just recommendations for action now, but decision-making strategies for schools under conditions that will continue to change.

Want an education?  You have to go to schol

The new report makes nine recommendations. First, schools should consider that staying closed poses a serious risk to children, especially the most vulnerable children. When possible, districts should “prioritize” full-time, in-person classes for the youngest children in elementary school, and for special needs children. Christakis says that this is because these two groups generally struggle the most with online learning and need the most supervision.

When it comes to mitigating the risks of the coronavirus once schools are open, the report says, adult staff should wear surgical masks, and everyone should have access to hand-washing sinks, soap and water or hand sanitizer. People should practice physical distancing and limiting large gatherings. Cleaning and ventilation are important but not sufficient, the report says. Furthermore, Christakis notes, “deep cleaning, as is currently recommended, is expensive and may or may not really make a big difference.” The report also includes a recommendation that states and the federal government provide funds to schools to safely reopen.

The report also goes into detail about processes for decision-making going forward and says districts should form coalitions to make decisions on opening, school operations and staying open. They should prioritize equity, understanding that communities of color are more affected by this virus, and that poor students and students of color are more likely to attend school in outdated and dilapidated buildings with overcrowded classrooms.

Coalitions, the report says, should work closely with local public health authorities in order to do contact tracing if someone at the school contracts the virus. This partnership should allow schools to keep tabs on the rate of infections in the broader community, which will determine whether they can stay open.

The true role of children and teenagers in spreading the coronavirus is not known. Christakis points out that “the explosions that we’re seeing now all across this country are happening while schools are closed. We can’t blame schools for what’s happening in Florida or Arizona or Texas.” Christakis says the next few months offer a crucial opportunity to finally do the research needed to help the public understand the risks that many districts are in the middle of taking right now.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. William Hicks says

    Even science and experts were ignored by guv. nuisance decree.

  2. William, that is Pretty Boy guv. nuisance to you, sir!

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