Oracle is moving OpenWorld out of San Fran

It is beginning to happen.  A multi-billion tech firm is moving its convention out of San Fran—because it is too expensive.  If a company that has a 23% profit margin, and billions in revenues can not afford San Fran—how can real people>  That is the spot Oracle is in.  so, they are going to Las Vegas—a free town where workers are free to join or not join a union, low taxes, and responsible laws.

“The Redwood Shores company has signed a three-year agreement to bring its OpenWorld convention to the Caesars Forum in Las Vegas, citing rising hotel rates throughout the Bay Area as well as poor street conditions in San Francisco. An Oracle spokesperson confirmed the deal, first reported by CNBC.

“Oracle is excited to offer a modern, state-of-the-art experience for attendees at Oracle OpenWorld and Code One 2020 in Las Vegas,” the spokesperson said. “The city and its vast amenities are tailor-made for hosting large-scale events, and we look forward to bringing the industry’s most comprehensive technology and developer conferences to America’s premier hospitality destination.”

Read that carefully, not only are the hotel costs too expensive—but the lifestyle is a disaster.

Note the concern about the homeless and the human feces—unmentioned is that war against cars and rid share operations—how many investors and firms from London want their executives to get to the convention on a bus?  San Fran is committing suicide—this should be a word of warning, before it dies.

Oracle is moving OpenWorld out of San Francisco

By Katie Burke,, San Francisco Business Times, 12/10/19 

Oracle Corp. is pulling the plug on its annual San Francisco technology convention, relocating the event to Las Vegas in a major blow to the city’s hospitality industry.

The Redwood Shores company has signed a three-year agreement to bring its OpenWorld convention to the Caesars Forum in Las Vegas, citing rising hotel rates throughout the Bay Area as well as poor street conditions in San Francisco. An Oracle spokesperson confirmed the deal, first reported by CNBC.

“Oracle is excited to offer a modern, state-of-the-art experience for attendees at Oracle OpenWorld and Code One 2020 in Las Vegas,” the spokesperson said. “The city and its vast amenities are tailor-made for hosting large-scale events, and we look forward to bringing the industry’s most comprehensive technology and developer conferences to America’s premier hospitality destination.”

The relocated convention — the third-biggest held in San Francisco in recent years based on room nights — will amount to a substantial loss for the city. CNBC said the San Francisco Travel Association will issue a cancellation notice for events through 2022 covering five days and more than 62,000 hotel room nights in October over the next three years. The number of room nights is typically even higher than the initial estimate. OpenWorld events have been held at the Moscone Center for the past two decades.

“The estimated economic impact of each of the above is $64 million, a huge loss for our city,” the association wrote in an email to its members this week, according to CNBC.

Along with Salesforce’s Dreamforce, OpenWorld has been a significant contributor to the city’s “October crush” period, when conventions left hotels, city streets and sidewalks jam-packed with attendees and tourists. San Francisco’s hospitality industry reaps the benefits through increased room and record occupancy rates. That crush period actually contributed to Salesforce’s decision to move Dreamforce to November in the last two years. The rising costs of hosting events in San Francisco has become an increasing concern among hospitality professionals. The average hotel rate in the metro area was nearly $264 a night in October, according to data from hotel analyst STR. According to Cheaphotels.org, Las Vegas is one of the most affordable cities for hotels, with rates averaging about $69 a night.

In September, Tom David, San Francisco Travel’s executive vice president and chief sales officer, said feedback on the recently expanded Moscone Center has been great, but visitors now say the cost of doing business in the city — from rooms to food to transportation — has gotten too expensive. 

“It has been a theme for groups coming in,” David said. “Some groups are having to subsidize attendee costs from registration fees because of overall expenses. One thing we can do is look at the value of group business, because when times get tough, most groups keep coming back.” 

The high costs of doing business in San Francisco have also caused companies to reconsider where they are located, with major companies moving their headquarters out of the Bay Area or choosing to expand in other markets.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.