Dumbest Idea EVER: San Diego Gives TICKETS to Homeless for Being Homeless

Here is another “Faulconer Folly”.  How does he handle the homeless?  He has the police give the homeless a ticket.  No, this is not a joke.  Seriously, think they will show up in court, have the money t pay the fine?  Or will they use the ticket for toilet paper?   Mayor Kevin Faulconer of San Diego is running around the State giving interviews, in his run up to run for Governor in 2022—as the new Arnold Schwarzenegger—claiming great success in his fight against homelessness.  Sadly, the Fake News media loves a GOP’er who does not support President Trump, like his idol, Arnold Schwarzenegger.

“During the coronavirus pandemic, San Diego police have issued more than twice as many tickets for illegal lodging — an infraction largely directed at homeless people — compared to the same time last year, according to data inewsource obtained.

There also has been an increase in two other enforcement actions generally aimed at the homeless: encroachment, or blocking a sidewalk, and living in a vehicle.

Estimates show San Diego has nearly 4,900 homeless people. Mayor Kevin Faulconer has said providing them with a safe place to live during and after the COVID-19 crisis is a priority.”

Maybe the police should be used instead to round up the criminals Guv Newsom has let out of jail with no cash bail who recommit crimes.  Make the public safer—not provide toilet paper to the homeless in the form of a ticket.

San Diego police issue twice as many illegal lodging tickets to homeless during pandemic

by Cody Dulaney, inewsource,   5/25/20   

During the coronavirus pandemic, San Diego police have issued more than twice as many tickets for illegal lodging — an infraction largely directed at homeless people — compared to the same time last year, according to data inewsource obtained.

There also has been an increase in two other enforcement actions generally aimed at the homeless: encroachment, or blocking a sidewalk, and living in a vehicle.

Estimates show San Diego has nearly 4,900 homeless people. Mayor Kevin Faulconer has said providing them with a safe place to live during and after the COVID-19 crisis is a priority.

This uptick in enforcement has happened as Mayor Kevin Faulconer repeatedly tells the public that the city’s main priority with the unsheltered homeless population is to get them off the streets and into the San Diego Convention Center, where at least 1,200 people are sheltering every night to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The makeshift shelter had room for about 200 more as of Friday, but the number fluctuates.

Faulconer has held news conferences nearly every day since mid-March to give updates on the city’s response to the coronavirus pandemic. At the briefings, reporters have asked him at least four times about police officers ticketing homeless people. He has largely avoided answering the question directly and instead repeats this message: It’s about encouragement to move into the convention center, not enforcement.

When asked on April 1 about police officers issuing encroachment tickets during the pandemic, Faulconer said: “As I mentioned earlier, our neighborhood policing division is still out there, still doing a remarkable job ensuring everybody’s health and safety. Again, their focus is going to continue to be, this facility (the convention center) is available, and we want folks to use it.”

At that point, officers were averaging 21 tickets a day for all three offenses, records show.

The City Council, showing its concern about ticketing homeless people, passed a resolution on March 17 asking Faulconer to consider suspending the ordinance against people sleeping in cars until the coronavirus crisis ends and to report back to the council with a strategy. More than two months later, officers have written 12 citations for the infraction, and the Mayor’s Office still hasn’t delivered a strategy to the council.

Rather than suspending the ordinance, city spokeswoman Ashley Bailey said the Mayor’s Office is encouraging people to take advantage of the city’s safe parking lots, where people living in their cars can park and access the services they need.

Citations and life on the streets

Every morning at 5:30, police officers start clearing downtown sidewalks of tents and small encampments that crop up overnight. A 2011 agreement the city reached in a lawsuit brought on behalf of homeless people allows them to bed down on the sidewalks from 9 p.m. to 5:30 a.m. and generally avoid illegal lodging tickets.

This early morning ritual by the police has gone on for years. But it’s continuing even though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued guidelines saying unsheltered homeless people should be allowed to remain where they are during the pandemic unless individual housing can be provided.

The data inewsource obtained includes citations issued from March 16 to May 16 and covers the years 2018, 2019 and 2020. March 16 was shortly before the state’s stay-at-home order took effect. Our analysis shows:

  • The blocks where the most citations have been issued are downtown.
  • The vast majority are issued during the 6 a.m. hour.
  • Seventy people have been ticketed more than once during the pandemic.

Police Capt. Scott Wahl said the citation numbers inewsource found don’t tell the whole story.

For the same period inewsource used, Wahl provided data that showed the number of field interviews — warnings rather than ticketing — for blocking a sidewalk have increased 24 percent compared to last year.

But Wahl’s data also shows warnings for a different violation, illegal lodging, have dropped during the pandemic, at the same time tickets for that offense have more than doubled.

The city can’t allow people to live in unsafe and unsanitary conditions, Wahl said.

“That’s where you end up with a hepatitis A outbreak like we had in 2017,” he said.

“Twenty people died on the streets of San Diego (during that outbreak) because of this unsanitary, very preventable environment. The way you prevent it is you don’t allow it to exist,” he added.

Getting shelter at San Diego Convention Center

Homeless people need a referral from the police or a homeless service provider to get a spot in the San Diego Convention Center shelter.

Outreach teams with the police and nonprofits contact people living on the streets and in canyons and riverbeds to evaluate their needs.

Officers have to balance compassion with accountability while also responding to community complaints, the captain said.

The options available to police early on in the pandemic were limited. Shelters couldn’t take anyone, and arrests of homeless people dropped to almost nothing because police couldn’t take them to jail, Wahl said.

“Yes, the citations did go up,” he said. “That was the only enforcement tool available at that time.”

After the San Diego Convention Center opened as a homeless shelter April 1, police slowed the number of citations directed at the homeless from 21 a day in March to about one a day in May, according to the data inewsource obtained.


Wahl said the goal of a citation is compliance. As long as people move along, they aren’t cited. The police are now trying a new approach, where the department will hold onto a ticket if someone agrees to take help. It will never show up on the person’s record, Wahl said.

CDC guidelines discourage breaking up encampments so people don’t disperse and spread the virus. Wahl said the intent is also to not break the connections homeless people have with service providers. The department’s homeless outreach teams are working the streets every day to get people the help they need, he said.

“What the CDC is not saying is, ‘Allow for an environment that is unhealthy, unsafe and unsanitary,’” said Wahl, adding that getting people into the convention center is the priority.

But not everyone wants to go.

‘People are very, very good to me there’

The convention center has been repurposed into one of the largest homeless shelters in Southern California during the coronavirus pandemic. As of Friday morning, 1,266 homeless people were staying there.

Three of the city’s largest homeless service providers — Alpha Project, Father Joe’s Villages and Veterans Village of San Diego — are each responsible for their own area.

Alpha Project is serving the largest number with 617 people, according to information provided Friday morning. It has room for 176 more. Father Joe’s is serving 457 people and is close to capacity. Veterans Village has 192 people and is also close to capacity.

To support the three nonprofits and oversee operations, the city has developed a team that includes city staff and officials from San Diego County, the Regional Task Force on the Homeless and the San Diego Housing Commission.

Everyone is working “to ensure we follow closely the evolving public health guidance,” said Bailey, the city spokeswoman.

The city estimates it’s spending $2.7 million a month to run the convention center as a shelter, she said.

Alpha Project CEO Bob McElroy recently gave inewsource a tour of its convention center operation. Staff checks the temperature of every person who enters — using a handheld, no-touch device — and asks whether the person has a cough or shortness of breath.

The giant room has hundreds of cots spaced about 6 feet apart as recommended for homeless shelters during the coronavirus pandemic. Some people have decorated their spaces with ornate designs and unique self-expression. A few have brought their cats or dogs. Men have one side, and women the other.

Two rows of tables line the front half of the room, where meals are served and two large projectors show live television against the walls. Counseling and mental health services are offered, each with their own designated space.

Breakfast, lunch and dinner is served daily, arriving in towers of closed plastic trays to feed the masses. On the day inewsource was there, lunch was tuna sandwiches — or egg salad for the vegetarians.

Trailers with showers and laundry facilities have been hauled into the loading bays so the people and their clothes can stay clean. McElroy said staff handles the laundry duties.

The doors to the convention center close at 8 p.m., and the lights go out at 11 p.m. When the doors open again at 4 a.m., people are allowed to leave and many do.

One of them is Mario Hernandez. He said the Neil Good Day Center, which offers homeless people resources and a place to be safe during the day, referred him to the convention center.

“People are very, very good to me there,” he said.

Although he said all of his needs are taken care of at the convention center, none of his friends feel comfortable there so he’s often alone. That’s why he leaves during the day.

‘It’s a beautiful day in San Diego!’

Some of the homeless people who live on the streets told inewsource the police hassle them.

When inewsource went to the East Village around 5 a.m. on multiple mornings in May, police were present. On one occasion, an officer pulled up in a patrol car and parked at 5:29 in front of a person sleeping on the sidewalk on the corner of 16th and Market streets. One minute later, the officer got out and nudged the person’s leg with his foot.

On several occasions, officers had few interactions — often saying something briefly and waiting from inside their vehicles while the person picked up their belongings from the sidewalk. Another time, after making eye contact with a reporter, an officer in a pickup said over the intercom, “Good morning, it’s 5:45. Time to wake up. It’s a beautiful day in San Diego!”

inewsource didn’t witness anyone receiving a citation. But Vernon Wellington was given a ticket at 5:57 a.m. on March 18 for blocking a sidewalk on Commercial Street.

Wellington said he tends to have a lot of belongings with him. He carries food and water, and has enough blankets to keep him warm at night and to build a makeshift mattress. That morning he probably took up half of the sidewalk and was given a citation, he said.

He didn’t refuse to move but admits he has a “smart mouth.” Either way, he doesn’t understand the point of a ticket. It only makes problems worse for people living on the streets, Wellington said.

“You got a lot of disturbed people out here, and (police are) pushing them to the point where they don’t think they have (anywhere) to go. You’re gonna push them into that disturbance,” he said.

Border Patrol Activity in Rural North County Alarms Farmworkers, Advocates

Shock.  ICE is doing its job to protect Americans.  The law is clear, illegal aliens are not allowed to work in the United States.  In the midst of a virus, the Feds are not only trying to find illegal aliens, but trying to find illegal aliens that are sick.  Instead the Left wants to protect law violators, even if it means fewer jobs for Americans and more people catch the virus.

“Barrios, who had a pending immigration case to gain legal status in the U.S., was on his way home to Temecula from San Diego County when he passed an immigration checkpoint residents say has been largely dormant for years, but has become active again during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Border agents quickly deported Barrios to Tijuana. His case garnered national attention for displaying border agents’ broad emergency powers during the pandemic. Barrios had an open case in U.S. immigration court, no prior deportation order and is a Guatemalan citizen – so if he was going to be deported, it shouldn’t have been to Tijuana. After 21 days in Tijuana, with help of the Guatemalan consul general in Los Angeles, he was brought back to the United States.

Why do people have little respect or trust in the law?  Here is a known illegal alien, deported and a foreign government gets the person allowed to come back into our nation.  Shame on us for allowing this.

Border Patrol Activity in Rural North County Alarms Farmworkers, Advocates

Immigrants, advocates and school officials say they’re troubled by an apparent increase in immigration checkpoints in rural northeastern San Diego County. Immigrants say they’re too scared to leave home to access food, medical care and school resources when the checkpoints are active.

Maya Srikrishnan, Voice of San Diego,   5/26/20 

On March 23, U.S. Border Patrol officers stopped Gilmer Barrios at a checkpoint on I-15 north between Fallbrook and Temecula.

Barrios, who had a pending immigration case to gain legal status in the U.S., was on his way home to Temecula from San Diego County when he passed an immigration checkpoint residents say has been largely dormant for years, but has become active again during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Border agents quickly deported Barrios to Tijuana. His case garnered national attention for displaying border agents’ broad emergency powers during the pandemic. Barrios had an open case in U.S. immigration court, no prior deportation order and is a Guatemalan citizen – so if he was going to be deported, it shouldn’t have been to Tijuana. After 21 days in Tijuana, with help of the Guatemalan consul general in Los Angeles, he was brought back to the United States.

Barrios’ case is one of several known arrests at these checkpoints in northeastern San Diego and southern Riverside county, said Jennaya Dunlap, an attorney with the Inland Coalition for Immigrant Justice that worked on his case.

Dunlap, along with residents and advocates in Fallbrook, De Luz, Pala and other parts of northeastern San Diego County say they’ve noticed an increase in the presence of Border Patrol since the coronavirus stay-at-home orders went into effect in March. Not only has the I-15 checkpoint re-activated, but another on SR-76 has also been reported active since March. Dunlap and others also say they’ve seen more roving patrols in northeastern San Diego County.

Border Patrol has expansive authority to stop and search people within the 100-mile border zone, which includes the entire county. At checkpoints, agents can stop drivers, question a vehicle’s occupants about their citizenship or place of birth and request proof of immigration status. Border Patrol agents can also station themselves along roadways to conduct “roving patrols,” where they lookout for people committing crimes or violating immigration law.

“San Diego Sector Border Patrol agents working at checkpoints are operating in a routine enforcement capacity,” said Supervisory Border Patrol Agent Jeff Stephenson in an email. “To be clear, there is no departure from standard enforcement operations. The ability to conduct checkpoint operations depends on various factors including traffic conditions, manpower and weather. When these factors collectively permit, checkpoint operations may be conducted.”

Border Patrol declined to answer questions about whether it has ramped up activity at checkpoints in North County, and data on these stops is notoriously difficult to come by. The Department of Homeland Security doesn’t publish data on how many people agents stop and question in the border zone, only how many people they detain. A 2017 Government Accountability Office report found that at the time, checkpoints make up about 2 percent of all unauthorized immigrant apprehensions and nearly half of all drug seizures, but also noted long-standing data quality issues that made it difficult to measure checkpoints’ contributions to border enforcement.

Dunlap’s organization has documented four arrests since March 23, including Barrios. Of the four, two were in San Diego and two were in Riverside. That’s up slightly from the one arrest per month her group typically documents. In the last quarter of 2019, they only had one case. Since March, her organization has also been getting reports two to three times a week of Border Patrol presence. Before the pandemic, they would get such reports once a week or a couple of times a month, she said. Because the area is rural and isolated, Dunlap thinks her group’s observations probably understate the increase.

 “The factor that really leads me to believe there is an increase is the I-15 checkpoint,” Dunlap said. “That checkpoint was not being used more than one or two times a week in the late night or early morning hours, and currently residents report it being used 24-7.”

Dunlap thinks Border Patrol may have re-opened the checkpoint and others because there is less traffic in general, so there will be fewer complaints of delays for non-immigrants.

Alianza Comunitaria, a North County advocacy organization that has for years verified Border Patrol checkpoints and communicated them to immigrants in the region, has also noticed the increase, said Ricardo Favela, the group’s coordinator. Residents alert Alianza Comunitaria of checkpoints and the organization sends out volunteers to verify the tips.

“The first week after the pandemic stay-at-home orders were called and schools were closed, that following Monday, the checkpoint on the freeway was active on a daily basis, which is unusual,” Favela said.

He said the I-15 checkpoint is particularly concerning during a pandemic because, for Fallbrook residents, the closest hospital is in Temecula – about 20 minutes away. The next closest is 40 minutes away in Escondido.

“To access [the Temecula ER], everyone has to go through that checkpoint while it’s on,” said Lilian Serrano, chair of the San Diego Immigrant Rights Consortium and an organizer with Alianza Comunitaria. “Whether you’re documented or not, you have to go through this additional screening now if you want to seek health care.”

Mitra Ebadolahi, an attorney with the American Civil Liberties Union of San Diego and Imperial Counties, said she’s been concerned about interior enforcement during the pandemic. The ACLU argues all interior immigration enforcement should cease during the pandemic.

“In this time of an unprecedented public health crisis, it is more important than ever that all interior checkpoints be shut down,” Ebadolahi said. “No one’s movement should be impeded by a Border Patrol checkpoint, when access to emergency care and resources can mean life or death.”

Stephenson said that continuing Border Patrol’s enforcement, including through checkpoints, is vital in not only preventing illegal border crossings, but intercepting illegal drugs, illicit currency, weapons, prohibited agriculture items and counterfeit materials – including counterfeit COVID-19 test kits.

“[Border Patrol] immigration checkpoints provide an extra layer of response and deterrence to the USBP strategy on illegal immigration, serving the overall national security mission,” Stephenson said.

For residents of the region – many of whom work in agriculture – immigration enforcement has added an additional layer of stress and challenges.

 “It’s very concerning that some of these temporary checkpoints are in the more rural areas,” Serrano said. “During the stay-at-home order, the ones we see using these roads are farmworkers. We have to ask them and their families to risk catching the virus to ensure our food distribution isn’t stopped, yet we also allow immigration enforcement to happen on their way to work.”

Margarita and Miguel, a couple who live and work in agriculture in De Luz, said when they get notice of checkpoints through Alianza Comunitaria or Facebook, they won’t leave the ranch where they live and work to avoid the risk. Voice of San Diego agreed not to identify them by last name because of their immigration status.

“You leave and you don’t know if you’ll return,” Miguel said.

The couple has three grandchildren – ages 4, 5 and 7 – with them on the ranch while schools are closed. There is more room for the children to run around and play, but because there is no internet, they drive to Fallbrook or Temecula so the kids can do their schoolwork.

On the days they hear of checkpoints, they’re too scared to bring the children into town, so distance learning just doesn’t happen those days.

Margarita told me that on a recent Monday, they drove by a couple who had been stopped by Border Patrol. The man was being arrested and the woman tried to wave them down for help. They couldn’t take the risk that they would be arrested, too, so they kept driving.

Monica Ruiz, senior director of Migrant Education at the San Diego County Office of Education, said she’s also about an increase in Border Patrol presence in those areas.

“There is a fear of them coming out of their homes,” Ruiz said.

She said she worries about food scarcity for families afraid to leave their homes. With increased immigration enforcement, parents may be scared to go to the store or do food pick-ups organized by schools.

“There are all these layers of stress on these families — on top of a pandemic, there’s Border Patrol and then food scarcity,” Ruiz said.

Araceli, a resident and community leader in Pala, said she’s been getting calls and notifications from residents and those who work in Pala about the checkpoints on SR-76. About a week and a half ago, she said she passed by a checkpoint herself, but was driving in the other direction so she didn’t have to go through it. Voice of San Diego agreed to withhold Araceli’s last name because of her immigration status.

“These types of checkpoints shouldn’t exist here,” Araceli said. “If they are wandering around here, it’s going to impact the agriculture industry because people can’t go to work. Or if they go, they’ll stay on the ranches for days, away from their family, to avoid the checkpoints.”

If someone living or working near Pala needs to go to a grocery store or get other services, they have to go to Fallbrook or Escondido, Araceli said. To do that, they must travel through the areas where the checkpoints have been active.

“For fear, you just can’t leave,” she said.

Dunlap said she opposed checkpoints and roving patrols even before the pandemic, because she views them as discriminatory: People are stopped because of their skin color, their Spanish music or the fact that they are driving a pick-up with tools in the back. And many of those picked up by immigration officials in this way, she said, have no criminal record or even any prior contact with immigration enforcement.

In 2015, the ACLU of San Diego and Imperial Counties sued Customs and Border Patrol for records detailing the agency’s “roving patrol” operations throughout Southern California. Documents show that agents conducting roving patrols between January 2011 and July 2014 stopped and detained people for sometimes ambiguous or murky reasons, like drivers speeding or slowing abruptly, not looking at agents who pulled up alongside the car, sitting rigidly upright in seats, acting nervously in the presence of Border Patrol agents or simply driving toward Los Angeles. Another more recent set of records received by the ACLU contained Border Patrol training materials that described what agents should contemplate when pulling someone over, including “whether the passengers appeared dirty.”

Racial profiling in these stops has been a longstanding concern. In the 1970s, the Supreme Court ruled that agents could use race to make these stops, as long as it’s not the only factor. But in 2000, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals rejected “any reliance on Hispanic appearance or ethnicity” in making roving patrol stops.

In immigration court, a person can contest the legality of a stop. But there is no guarantee of a government-appointed attorney in immigration court, the way there is in criminal court, so many stops are never questioned. Changes to federal law in 2019 have also given Border Patrol the ability to deport people more quickly within the 100-mile border zone and new emergency authority granted during the coronavirus pandemic allow agents to promptly turn back people at the border, meaning many people don’t even have a chance in court anymore.

“Then when you add in COVID, it makes it so much worse,” Dunlap said. “They’re generating fear in the whole community, so people are not reaching out for the help and aid that they need right now.”

Colman: A TRANSPORTATION HORROR

Want to witness a crime?  Ride the BART.  Need to get a disease?  Ride the BART?  Want to lose a ton of money by spending MORE on fewer riders?  That is the BART.  This is a system that is the cause of the spread of a deadly virus.  Will people come back and use it?  In fact, due to the virus you will see an exodus of people from the Silicon Valley/Bay Area to other States.  This is another dead government agency.

 (1) CRIME:  BART is dangerous.  In Lafayette, two passengers were stabbed while standing on the platform, waiting for a train.  In Oakland, 40 to 60 marauding youths entered a train and started robbing and beating passengers.  By the time the police arrived, the hoodlums were gone.

(5) STRIKES:  In 2013, BART workers went on strike twice.  In 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt said public employee strikes are not acceptable.  Why are BART workers allowed to strike?

(6) GATE-JUMPING:  In recent years, there has been an epidemic of people jumping over BART gates and getting free rides.

(7) NO SEATS:  When boarding a BART train, there are often no seats, especially during rush hour.  Thus a passenger boarding a train going from Lafayette to San Francisco may have to stand for the entire journey.”

This is a system that will collapse months after people go back to work—due to lack of riders.  Will Sacramento and Washington bail them out to protect the unions?  I expect that to happen.

A TRANSPORTATION HORROR

By Richard Colman, Exclusive to the California Political News and Views,  5/27/20 

BART (Bay Area Rapid Transit) is a horror story. 

BART serves — or is supposed to serve — passengers in the San Francisco Bay Area.

 BART is supposed to be government-run example of the best of socialism.

 BART provides fixed-rail transportation that is both above ground and below ground.

 When promoted in the 1960’s, BART promised to take riders swiftly and cheaply to their destinations.  For example, BART was supposed to whisk passengers, in about 20 minutes, from Lafayette, California, an affluent suburb 20 miles east of San Francisco, to San Francisco itself.

 When BART opened in the early 1970’s, there was enthusiasm for riding BART.  People would buy tickets just to experience a BART ride.

 In the last seven to ten years, BART has become a horror story.  Instead of fast, clean transportation, BART has become crime-ridden and expensive.

 Here are 10 reasons to avoid BART:

 (1) CRIME:  BART is dangerous.  In Lafayette, two passengers were stabbed while standing on the platform, waiting for a train.  In Oakland, 40 to 60 marauding youths entered a train and started robbing and beating passengers.  By the time the police arrived, the hoodlums were gone.

 (2) COST:  BART is too expensive.  Riding BART can cost $69 or for a two-day pass.

 (3) THE SUBSIDY:  BART is supported by taxpayers in several counties such as Contra Costa, Alameda, and San Francisco.  The subsidy involves a one-half percentage point increase in the local county sales tax.

 (4) PARKING:  At many BART stations, there is supposed to be ample parking.  Instead, many BART parking lots on workdays are full by 7:00 A.M.  BART parking used to be free.  Now, a vehicle has to pay a fee to park in a BART lot.

(5) STRIKES:  In 2013, BART workers went on strike twice.  In 1937, President Franklin D. Roosevelt said public employee strikes are not acceptable.  Why are BART workers allowed to strike?

(6) GATE-JUMPING:  In recent years, there has been an epidemic of people jumping over BART gates and getting free rides.

(7) NO SEATS:  When boarding a BART train, there are often no seats, especially during rush hour.  Thus a passenger boarding a train going from Lafayette to San Francisco may have to stand for the entire journey.

(8) RUDE EMPLOYEES:  Sometimes the ticket-dispensing machines at BART stations do not work properly.  After a person pays for his ride and does not get his BART ticket, he has to speak with a BART attendant, who can display a hostile attitude.

(9) OVERPAID EMPLOYEES:  BART workers earn significant amounts of money and work less than 40 hours per week.  In 2015, a BART janitor, whose annual salary was supposed to be $57,000 a year, earned $270,000 annually.

 (10) CLENLINESS:  BART trains can be dirty.  Sometimes passengers have body odor.

 So there you have it:  10 reasons to avoid BART.

 The time has come to demolish BART or make it self-supporting, safe, and part of private enterprise.

 People who need to go somewhere should find an alternative to BART.  Why pay a lot of money for the privilege of ending up beaten, robbed, or dead?

SRVUSD board to consider raises for executive cabinet, management

We know the State is going to CUT government education by billions in the new budget.  So what is a school district to do?  Instead of saving their money, they are spending it like drunken sailors trying to buy off unions for the future.  Simi Valley Unified gave a 2% “bonus” to teachers—not knowing how many students they will have if they re-open and there costs.  The Conejo Valley schools (Thousand Oaks) gave a 6% raise—retroactive to January.  Why?  So that they can say they are broke and will close the schools if the State or Feds does not bail them out.  Corruption?  You bet.

“The San Ramon Valley school board is set to give retiring Superintendent Rick Schmitt, his executive cabinet and management staff 2.56% retroactive pay raises for this school year on Tuesday — in line with the salary increases that the district’s unionized employees received.

Later in the meeting, the board will discuss a plan for decreasing expenditures by $8 million next school year, including employment reductions, as required by the Contra Costa County Office of Education, which raised concerns about the ability for the district to pay for negotiated salary increases after this year.

So, they give significant raise to the Superintendent—months before he is to retire, so his pension is larger and to the unions—increasing pension payments to CalSTRS.  Then they announce they have to have staff reductions.  Maybe if they did not raise the pay they would have the money to save the jobs?  Incompetence or corruption?  You decide.  Is this going on in your school district?  Please let me know.

Teachers in the nation’s second-largest school district will go on strike as soon as Jan. 10 if there’s no settlement of its long-running contract dispute, union leaders said Wednesday, Dec. 19. The announcement by United Teachers Los Angeles threatens the first strike against the Los Angeles Unified School District in nearly 30 years and follows about 20 months of negotiations. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes) ORG XMIT: CADD303

SRVUSD board to consider raises for executive cabinet, management

Also: District looks at plan for $8M in cost reductions needed for 2020-21

by Jeremy Walsh, DanvilleRamon,   5/25/20 

The San Ramon Valley school board is set to give retiring Superintendent Rick Schmitt, his executive cabinet and management staff 2.56% retroactive pay raises for this school year on Tuesday — in line with the salary increases that the district’s unionized employees received.

Later in the meeting, the board will discuss a plan for decreasing expenditures by $8 million next school year, including employment reductions, as required by the Contra Costa County Office of Education, which raised concerns about the ability for the district to pay for negotiated salary increases after this year.

The district has a longstanding policy of extending the same salary and benefits increases across the board for all district employees. Labor negotiations typically occur during the school year for potential raises that year, resulting in the changes being applied retroactively.

In light of the raises negotiated by the teacher and classified employee unions, the district’s executive cabinet, as well as the management and confidential employees, are recommended to receive a 2.56% salary increase for 2019-20 retroactive to July 1, 2019. The total cost of the increases (salary and benefits) for those two categories of employees are $41,100 and $461,476, respectively.

For Schmitt, who is retiring June 30, that means his base salary for his final year would be retroactively raised to $357,832.

For the rest of Schmitt’s executive cabinet, their new 2019-20 salaries would be $261,593 for deputy superintendent of educational services Toni Taylor (who retired midyear), $262,186 for assistant superintendent of facilities and operations Gary Black (who is retiring June 30), $237,810 for assistant superintendent of human resources Keith Rogenski, $226,486 for chief business officer Greg Medici and $226,486 for assistant superintendent of educational services Christine Huajardo (who succeed Taylor, in a restructured position, midyear).

The board will also consider confirming the contract for Daniel Hillman to become assistant superintendent of business operations and facilities effective July 1, with an annual base salary of $226,486.

Staff said Hillman’s promotion to succeed Black in a restructured position will actually save the district about $290,000 per year because Black had more seniority and Hillman’s prior position of executive director of business services is being eliminated.

Budget reductions will be a key part of the conversation as well Tuesday night, as the board will review staff’s recommendation for decreasing expenditures by $8 million next school year after the county raised concerns about future structural deficits in the SRVUSD budget in light of costs from the salary bumps for unionized employees.

“CCCOE has serious concerns regarding the financial condition of the district, due to the additional ongoing costs proposed by the settlement agreements and the district’s projection of negative multi-year ending balance, being further compounded by developing economic events,” Medici wrote in a staff report to the board.

Stay informed

Get daily headlines sent straight to your inbox.

By issuing a conditional approval of the salary settlement disclosures, the county required SRVUSD to develop a budget reduction plan on or before adoption of the 2020-21 district budget.

The plan recommended to the board includes reducing certified employees by 34 full-time equivalent (FTE) positions, eliminating 10 FTE classified employee positions, decreasing district business office expenditures, and reducing spending by the cabinet and individual school sites — to the tune of $8 million combined.

Later, Medici will lead a board discussion on Gov. Gavin Newsom’s revised budget proposal, which includes reductions in K-12 spending because of the COVID-19 economic downturn.

Board members will also consider approving a resolution in support of the “Schools and Communities First” initiative on the statewide ballot in November.

They will receive an update on another potential statewide ballot measure — a proposed constitutional amendment to repeal California’s ban on affirmative action — that still needs to pass out of the State Legislature before heading to voters.

The board will also discuss revising its internal bylaws to align with the current SRVUSD election practice that all board members are elected by trustee-area rather than at-large.

As part of the 10-item consent agenda, the board will consider accepting the resignation of Pine Valley Middle School principal Jason Law — listed among a variety of resignations, retirements and other personnel changes.

The board’s open-session meeting, which is scheduled to start at 7 p.m. Tuesday (May 26), will be held online only via Zoom in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated shelter-in-place guidelines.

Board members will begin their meeting day with a special reception, virtually, to recognize new district retirees from 4:30-5 p.m. on the SRVUSD YouTube channel.

They will then adjourn into closed session from 5-7 p.m. to talk about appointing a new principal for Bella Vista Elementary School in San Ramon, two pending legal cases, labor negotiations with the three employee unions, and consultation, review and recommendations for the district’s coronavirus response.

For instructions on how to view the open meeting or submit a public comment to be considered for open or closed session, visit the agenda webpage.

LA Pay-to-Play Corruption: They All Knew

Los Angeles is in competition with Chicago to see which City can be the most corrupt.  It is neck and neck.  L.A. city council has one member pleadings guilty, several others have had their homes and offices raided by the FBI—and it is expected that Mitch Englander, the now former city councilmember who pled guilty is singing louder than any rock.

“Mayor Eric Garcetti and the Los Angeles City Council were shocked, shocked by the revelation that one of its members, Jose Huizar, (photo above) was the principal player in pay-to-play corruption schemes involving the up zoning of large real estate developments, creating hundreds of millions of dollars in extra profits for unscrupulous developers.

 As a result, Council President Nury Martinez (Photo left) has asked Huizar to stop attending Council meetings.  Councilmen Buscaino, Krekorian, and Blumenfield have called for Huizar’s resignation.  Councilmen Ryu has introduced two motions to limit the right of the City Council to overwrite the actions of planning commissions and to establish an Office of Anti-Corruption and Transparency.  

But this is just theatre because the members of the City Council and Mayor Garcetti knew, or should have known, that the planning and land use system was corrupt. 

By that standard, several other councilmembers should also be put in isolation—maybe even the Mayor.  Corruption—Los Angeles is writing a new chapter.

Photo courtesy of Eric Garcetti, Flickr.

LA Pay-to-Play Corruption: They All Knew

Jack Humphreville, CityWatchLA,  5/25/20 

LA WATCHDOG-Mayor Eric Garcetti and the Los Angeles City Council were shocked, shocked by the revelation that one of its members, Jose Huizar, (photo above) was the principal player in pay-to-play corruption schemes involving the up zoning of large real estate developments, creating hundreds of millions of dollars in extra profits for unscrupulous developers.

 As a result, Council President Nury Martinez (Photo left) has asked Huizar to stop attending Council meetings.  Councilmen Buscaino, Krekorian, and Blumenfield have called for Huizar’s resignation.  Councilmen Ryu has introduced two motions to limit the right of the City Council to overwrite the actions of planning commissions and to establish an Office of Anti-Corruption and Transparency.  

But this is just theatre because the members of the City Council and Mayor Garcetti knew, or should have known, that the planning and land use system was corrupt. 

In 2015, the City Council overrode the Area Planning Commission and approved the luxury, 27 story development at Catalina and 8th Street, helped along by a $1.25 million pledge from a Beverly Hills developer to the Garcetti’s Affordable Housing Trust Fund and Wesson’s community slush fund.  

The City Council also overrule the Planning Commission and approved the $72 million Sea Breeze development in Harbor City, no doubt helped along by over $600,000 in campaign contributions to Janice Hahn, Joe Buscaino, Mitch Englander, Eric Garcetti, and other members of the City Council. 

In 2013, the City Council approved the controversial twin tower Millennium Hollywood development, a pet project of then Councilmen Eric Garcetti, despite the adverse impact on traffic, helped along by the New York developer spending more than $4 million to grease the skids.  

These controversial deals were all approved by the City Council and Mayor, making it very difficult for them to claim ignorance. 

There were also billions in other developments that required zoning changes that were approved by the City Council and the Mayor.  

In DTLA, City Hall blessed billions in oversized residential developments: Oceanside, Metropolis, and the Luxe Hotel, all of which have been referred to in court filings by the United States Attorney’s Office and FBI. 

Other controversial developments include The Reef in Historic South Central; the Cumulus in West Adams; the Millennium (now rebranded as the Hollywood Center Project and the poster child for corruption), the Palladium and the Spaghetti Factory in Hollywood; the Reliable Properties development at Palms and Sepulveda where wannabe Controller Paul Koretz is sponsoring a multimillion fee waiver for the developer, and numerous other megadevelopments in the Valley, the Westside, the Eastside, and other parts of the City.  

[As an aside, there are so many developments in the City that our official bird is now the crane, many of which dominate skylines of Hollywood and DTLA.]  

City Hall is corrupt enterprise that does not deserve our trust.  Our Elected Elite have also sold us out by approving the budget busting labor agreements with the City’s campaign funding public sector unions that created a $1.6 billion river of red ink over the next four years.    

The Mayor and the City Council must reform City Hall.  This includes adopting Ryu’s two motions for starters, implementing real campaign finance reform, and increasing transparency into labor negotiations and the City’s budget and finances.  Until then, the Mayor and the City Council cannot expect to us to buy into their baloney or expect us to vote for any increase in our taxes, including the Split Roll in November that will hit Californians up for $12 billion.

 (Jack Humphreville writes LA Watchdog for CityWatch. He is the President of the DWP Advocacy Committee and is the Budget and DWP representative for the Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council.  He is a Neighborhood Council Budget Advocate. 

Murrieta Church Defies State Public Health Rules, Holds In-Person Services

No one has repealed the First Amendment to the Constitution.  Not even the Regressive Guv Newsom.  People have the right to prayer—and to prayer together in a church.  How do you stop the Newsom efforts to end organized religion in California?  Easy?  Ignore him and recognize the Constitution.

“Pastor Tim Thompson prays in a parking lot with people who attended to an online Sunday Service inside their cars at the Christian ‘412 Church Murrieta’ parking lot on April 19, 2020 in Murrieta, California.

A Murrieta church held in-person worship services attended by hundreds of people Sunday in defiance of the state’s coronavirus shutdown order a day before the governor is expected to release reopening guidelines for houses of worship.

Pastor Tim Thompson of 412 Church Murrieta told the Riverside Press- Enterprise that the church has held such gatherings since May 3.”

This Sunday over 1200 churches are being opened—is yours?  Why not?  It is a way to tell the Governor he needs to go to Confession.

Murrieta Church Defies State Public Health Rules, Holds In-Person Services

Gov. Gavin Newsom said Friday that the state will issue guidelines by Monday for the reopening of churches and other houses of worship across the state

By City News Service, 5/24/20       

Pastor Tim Thompson prays in a parking lot with people who attended to an online Sunday Service inside their cars at the Christian ‘412 Church Murrieta’ parking lot on April 19, 2020 in Murrieta, California.

A Murrieta church held in-person worship services attended by hundreds of people Sunday in defiance of the state’s coronavirus shutdown order a day before the governor is expected to release reopening guidelines for houses of worship.

Pastor Tim Thompson of 412 Church Murrieta told the Riverside Press- Enterprise that the church has held such gatherings since May 3.

According to Thompson, congregants were being allowed to maintain social distance and wear face coverings, though it was not a requirement.

Local

Local news from across Southern California

Its sister congregation in San Jacinto has also been holding in-person gatherings since May 10.

The state allows houses of worship to hold drive-up services in parking lots but indoor gatherings such as the ones held by the Murrieta and San Jacinto churches are currently banned.

Gov. Gavin Newsom said Friday that the state will issue guidelines by Monday for the reopening of churches and other houses of worship across the state despite President Donald Trump’s insistence that they be allowed to reopen immediately for in-person services.

Newsom said the state has been “working with the faith community to advance the efforts to begin to put out guidelines, processes and procedures to (protect the) health and safety of congregants and parishioners.”

“We’ve been working throughout the interfaith community … all up and down the state, working on the differentiation, the large mega-churches versus more neighborhood-style churches and different styles of pews and sanitation protocols, synagogues versus working with other faiths. We’ve been working on those sectoral guidelines and we are just days away, at the latest on Monday, we will put out those guidelines.”

Newsom’s comments last week came hours after Trump held a news conference deeming houses of worship to be “essential,” and saying he would override governors of states that refuse to allow them to open immediately.

“Some governors have deemed liquor stores and abortion clinics as essential,” Trump said. “It’s not right. So I’m correcting this injustice and calling houses of worship essential.”

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released “interim guidance” Friday for houses of worship, while continuing to warn that “gatherings present a risk for increasing the spread of COVID-19 during this public health emergency.”

The CDC guidance includes standard recommendations such as frequent hand-washing, encouraging face coverings for staff and congregants, frequent cleaning of surfaces and promotion of social distancing through physical set-up and limited attendance.

The guidelines also recommend changes in the way houses of worship collect financial donations, limited physical contact such as shaking hands or hugging, and limiting the sharing of objects such as prayer books and cups.

More than 1,200 pastors and clergy from across California, including Thompson, signed a letter to the governor earlier this week saying they plan to resume in-person services May 31, regardless of state restrictions.

Shaw: Under the Law Newsom Acts Like a Rogue Governor

Many have asked if the Regressive Guv Newsom has the authority to close down California.  Mark Shaw has done the research showing the LIMITED ability of the Governor—just for those infected and a few others.  Mostly, he acted illegally, saying, “if you do not like it, sue me”.  So lawsuits have been filed.  In the meantime, millions are unemployed, students lost at least a semester of education and tens of thousands of businesses will never open again.

“(a), the local health officer may issue orders to other governmental entities within the local health officer’s jurisdiction to take any action the local health officer deems necessary to control the spread of the communicable disease.

(c) A local health officer that provides the notification and information to a governmental entity pursuant to subdivision (a), and the governmental entity that receives the notification and information, shall comply with all applicable state and federal privacy laws.

(Added by Stats. 2019, Ch. 798, Sec. 1. (AB 262) Effective January 1, 2020.)

Bottom line:  It is the job of local health officials, not the Governor to make decisions about salons, jobs, churches and business.  The Governor usurped the responsibility.  In most cases, his Executive Orders—39 and the 172 laws he changed without a vote of the Legislature is totally illegal.  More reason for him to be Recalled.  Will you help?

Shaw:  Under the Law Newsom Acted Like a Rogue Governor

Mark Shaw, Exclusive to the California Political News and Views,  5/27/20

On March 4, in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a state of emergency, allowing him to override virtually every law on the books.

I  have not been able to find any such allowance in the laws of the state.  The emergency provisions of the Code are sweeping, but they do not allow laws to be overridden.  They do allow the Governor to suspend administrative, procedural regulations (i.e., red tape) that might otherwise hinder an effective governmental response to an emergency.  Except as noted below, they do not allow the Governor to abrogate any other laws, or to substitute executive orders in place of any other laws, or to issue executive orders governing anything outside of the Governor’s purely administrative responsibilities:

8571.

During a state of war emergency or a state of emergency the Governor may suspend any regulatory statute, or statute prescribing the procedure for conduct of state business, or the orders, rules, or regulations of any state agency, including subdivision (d) of Section 1253 of the Unemployment Insurance Code, where the Governor determines and declares that strict compliance with any statute, order, rule, or regulation would in any way prevent, hinder, or delay the mitigation of the effects of the emergency.

(Amended by Stats. 1990, Ch. 1474, Sec. 1.)

The Governor’s emergency authorities extend to private entities in one way only: The Governor is allowed to commandeer private property and personnel where necessary to carry out his responsibilities in the emergency, but he is required to pay for it:

8572.

In the exercise of the emergency powers hereby vested in him during a state of war emergency or state of emergency, the Governor is authorized to commandeer or utilize any private property or personnel deemed by him necessary in carrying out the responsibilities hereby vested in him as Chief Executive of the state and the state shall pay the reasonable value thereof.

Notwithstanding the provisions of this section, the Governor is not authorized to commandeer any newspaper, newspaper wire service, or radio or television station, but may, during a state of war emergency or state of emergency, and if no other means of communication are available, utilize any news wire services, and the state shall pay the reasonable value of such use. In so utilizing any such facilities, the Governor shall interfere as little as possible with their use for the transmission of news.

(Added by Stats. 1970, Ch. 1454.)

Regarding health emergencies, and more particularly emergencies regarding communicable and infectious diseases, governmental authority is limited to gathering and disseminating information, to mobilizing governmental entities, and to the isolation and/or quarantine of infected or infectious individuals, animals, property, or other things that might harbor or spread disease:

HEALTH AND SAFETY CODE – HSC

DIVISION 105. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE PREVENTION AND CONTROL [120100 – 122477]

  ( Division 105 added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. )

PART 1. ADMINISTRATION OF COMMUNICABLE DISEASE PREVENTION AND CONTROL [120100 – 120305]

  ( Part 1 added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. )

CHAPTER 3. Functions and Duties of Local Health Officers [120175 – 120250]

  ( Chapter 3 added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. )

120175.

 Each health officer knowing or having reason to believe that any case of the diseases made reportable by regulation of the department, or any other contagious, infectious or communicable disease exists, or has recently existed, within the territory under his or her jurisdiction, shall take measures as may be necessary to prevent the spread of the disease or occurrence of additional cases.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120175.5.

 (a) During an outbreak of a communicable disease, or upon the imminent and proximate threat of a communicable disease outbreak or epidemic that threatens the public’s health, a local health officer shall do both of the following:

(1) Promptly notify and update governmental entities within the local health officer’s jurisdiction about communicable diseases listed in Section 2500 of Title 17 of the California Code of Regulations that may affect them, if, in the opinion of the local health officer, action or inaction on the part of the governmental entity might affect outbreak response efforts.

(2) Make any relevant information available to governmental entities, including, but not limited to, the locations of concentrations of cases, the number of residents affected, and the measures that the governmental entities should take to assist with outbreak response efforts.

(b) In addition to the actions required under subdivision (a), the local health officer may issue orders to other governmental entities within the local health officer’s jurisdiction to take any action the local health officer deems necessary to control the spread of the communicable disease.

(c) A local health officer that provides the notification and information to a governmental entity pursuant to subdivision (a), and the governmental entity that receives the notification and information, shall comply with all applicable state and federal privacy laws.

(Added by Stats. 2019, Ch. 798, Sec. 1. (AB 262) Effective January 1, 2020.)

120176.

 During an outbreak of communicable disease, or upon the imminent and proximate threat of communicable disease outbreak or epidemic that threatens the public’s health, all health care providers, clinics, health care service plans, pharmacies, their suppliers, distributors, and other for-profit and nonprofit entities shall, upon request of the local health officer, disclose to the local health officer inventories of, critical medical supplies, equipment, pharmaceuticals, vaccines, or other products that may be used for the prevention of, or may be implicated in the transmission of communicable disease. The local health officer shall keep this proprietary information confidential

(Added by Stats. 2006, Ch. 874, Sec. 6. Effective January 1, 2007.)

120180.

 If the health officer of any county having a population of 5,000,000 or more employs personnel as inspectors or investigators in the enforcement of the Communicable Disease Prevention and Control Act (Section 27), who are not otherwise licensed, registered, nor certified by this state, the personnel shall meet any one of the following minimum standards and qualifications:

(a)  Possess a bachelor’s degree in public health from an institution on the list of accredited colleges of the United States Office of Education.

(b)  Possess a bachelor’s degree with a minimum of 30 semester units of basic sciences from an institution on the list of accredited colleges of the United States Office of Education; or a statement from an accredited institution that the applicant has successfully completed a minimum of 16 semester units distributed among at least the following fields: public health and administration, epidemiology, public health statistics, public health microbiology, and communicable disease control.

(c)  Possess a bachelor’s degree from an institution on the list of accredited colleges of the United States Office of Education; and have had at least one year of full-time experience or the equivalent in investigation or inspection work in public health or law enforcement.

(d)  Be employed as an inspector or investigator in communicable disease prevention and control by a county health department in the State of California, and have passed an official civil service examination therefor prior to the effective date of this section.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120185.

 In the case of a local epidemic of disease, the health officer shall report at those times as are requested by the department all facts concerning the disease, and the measures taken to abate and prevent its spread.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120190.

 Each health officer shall immediately report by telegraph or telephone to the department every discovered or known case or suspect case of those diseases designated for immediate reporting by the department. Within 24 hours after investigation each health officer shall make reports as the department may require.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120195.

 Each health officer shall enforce all orders, rules, and regulations concerning quarantine or isolation prescribed or directed by the department.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120200.

 Each health officer, whenever required by the department, shall establish and maintain places of quarantine or isolation that shall be subject to the special directions of the department.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120205.

 No quarantine shall be established by a county or city against another county or city without the written consent of the department.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120210.

 Whenever in the judgment of the department it is necessary for the protection or preservation of the public health, each health officer shall, when directed by the department, do the following:

(a)  Quarantine or isolate and disinfect persons, animals, houses or rooms, in accordance with general and specific instructions of the department.

(b)  Destroy bedding, carpets, household goods, furnishings, materials, clothing, or animals, when ordinary means of disinfection are considered unsafe, and when the property is, in the judgment of the department, an imminent menace to the public health.

When the property is destroyed pursuant to this section, the governing body of the locality where the destruction occurs may make adequate provision for compensation in proper cases for those injured thereby.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120215.

 Upon receiving information of the existence of contagious, infectious, or communicable disease for which the department may from time to time declare the need for strict isolation or quarantine, each health officer shall:

(a)  Ensure the adequate isolation of each case, and appropriate quarantine of the contacts and premises.

(b)  Follow local rules and regulations, and all general and special rules, regulations, and orders of the department, in carrying out the quarantine or isolation.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120220.

 When quarantine or isolation, either strict or modified, is established by a health officer, all persons shall obey his or her rules, orders, and regulations.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120225.

 A person subject to quarantine or strict isolation, residing or in a quarantined building, house, structure, or other shelter, shall not go beyond the lot where the building, house, structure, or other shelter is situated, nor put himself or herself in immediate communication with any person not subject to quarantine, other than the physician, the health officer or persons authorized by the health officer.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120230.

 No instructor, teacher, pupil, or child who resides where any contagious, infectious, or communicable disease exists or has recently existed, that is subject to strict isolation or quarantine of contacts, shall be permitted by any superintendent, principal, or teacher of any college, seminary, or public or private school to attend the college, seminary, or school, except by the written permission of the health officer.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120235.

 No quarantine shall be raised until every exposed room, together with all personal property in the room, has been adequately treated, or, if necessary, destroyed, under the direction of the health officer; and until all persons having been under strict isolation are considered noninfectious.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120240.

 If, pursuant to Section 120130, a modified isolation order is issued, and the order is not complied with, the local health officer may, in that instance, issue a strict isolation order.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec. 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120245.

 Each health officer, other than a county health officer, in the county shall transmit to the county health officer at least weekly in writing a report showing the number and character of infectious, contagious, or communicable diseases reported, and their location.

(Added by Stats. 1995, Ch. 415, Sec 7. Effective January 1, 1996.)

120250.

 All physicians, nurses, clergymen, attendants, owners, proprietors, managers, employees, and persons living with, or visiting any sick person, in any hotel, lodginghouse, house, building, office, structure, or other place where any person is ill of any infectious, contagious, or communicable disease, shall promptly report that fact to the health officer, together with the name of the person, if known, the place where he or she is confined, and the nature of the disease, if known.

(Amended by Stats. 1996, Ch. 1023, Sec. 350.5. Effective September 29, 1996.)

https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/codes_displayText.xhtml?lawCode=HSC&division=105.&title=&part=1.&chapter=3.&article=

The law regulating governments’ response to the occurrence of contagious, infectious or communicable disease is limited to:

  • Collecting, transmitting, and reporting information about the disease.
  • Issuing orders to other governmental entities.
  • Issuing orders to quarantine or isolate infected or infectious persons, animals, property, or other things.
  • Limiting the gathering of persons within educational settings.
  • Requiring any persons living with or visiting sick persons to report the names of the persons and the names of the places visited.

The law does not allow for any other restrictions to be placed upon any other non-infected, non-infectious persons, for any other reasons.  The law simply does not apply to all other persons.  And no Governor’s emergency order, or health order, nor any local health officer’s health order can apply to all other, healthy, non-infectious persons.

Data: Left-Demanded Mass Transit Fueled Covid-19 Deaths

This is what we know.  The more crowded a community—Chicago, New York, Houston, Los Angeles, the more likely people are to get the virus and more likely to die.  Why?  Those cities believe in the stack’em and pack’em vision of life.  High density living, then pushing the people to use government transportation.  Only the dense population of prisons are more susceptible to the virus than these cities.  Take away the dirty, disease laden government buses and trains, get rid of high density living, and the virus would be a footnote.  Almost have, 40,000, have died in just two States—New York and New Jersey—almost all in their big cities.

“A significant factor that does stand out in the virus’ spread, however, is the prevalence of mass transit in a state. Heavier reliance on mass transit is also statistically linked to population density, although urban areas in California and Texas offer an exception. At the state level, 28.0 percent of New Yorkers use mass transit to commute to work and so do 11.7 percent in New Jersey, compared to 4.9 percent in California and 0.6 percent in Texas.

Further, mass transit was declared an essential service. Thus, when New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo ordered nursing homes to accept COVID-19 patients, a policy now widely seen as a fatal error, that decision may have been compounded by the many health-care workers who commuted to those nursing homes on the subway, having caught the virus in the dark, damp, and poorly ventilated environment then becoming asymptomatic carriers.

The data is clear—the more you use government transportation, the more likely you are to get the disease.  The fewer that use government transportation, the more likely you are to be healthy.  When will California learn that lesson?

Data: Left-Demanded Mass Transit Fueled Covid-19 Deaths

There appears to be no statistical connection between improved health outcomes and pandemic policies that forced nearly 40 million people into the unemployment lines.

By Chuck DeVore, The Federalist,  5/26/20   

There appears to be no statistical connection between the economic pain of the nationwide shutdowns and the number of COVID-19 cases or fatalities. None. Let that sink in for a moment, given we were told we had to lock down America to “flatten the curve” and save lives.

On the other hand, the data does suggest that reliance on mass transit is connected with virus cases and fatalities.

The latest state-level unemployment report was issued May 22 by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) for the month of April. The numbers are brutal, with each bit of cold data representing people who have lost their livelihoods, seeing their plans derailed by a virus released by what appears to be sloppy lab procedures in Wuhan, China.

Unlike the weekly drumbeat of unemployment insurance claims the Department of Labor publishes every Thursday morning, this monthly BLS report includes people who have been rehired, and incorporates other methods to more accurately gauge how many people are out of work.

A state’s increase in unemployment from the February report, before the economic damage from the stay-at-home orders took hold, to April, can serve as a proxy for the degree of a state’s effort to lock down residents. What does it show?

Allowing for the fact that some places, such as Hawaii and Nevada, are heavily dependent on tourism while others, such as Connecticut and the District of Columbia, have a large share of white-collar workers who can work from home, the data shows no connection between the increase in unemployment and either COVID-19 case rate, fatality rate, or even age-adjusted fatality rate.

Put another way, there appears to be no statistical connection between improved health outcomes and pandemic policies that forced nearly 40 million people into the unemployment lines. None.

One might expect to see that states that suffered the most in COVID cases or fatalities would also be the states with the highest increases in unemployment as politicians and public health officials in those areas instituted strict measures to slow the disease. Alternatively, states that hadn’t seen much in the way of the virus should be relatively better off economically.

Among the 15 most-populous states, New York has the highest COVID case rate, the highest death rate, and the highest age-adjusted death rate, while its unemployment rate jumped 10.8 percent from February to April.

At the other end of the spectrum, Texas has the lowest case rate, the lowest death rate, and the lowest age-adjusted death rate among the 15 most-populous states. Texas’ unemployment rate increased 9.3 percent over the past two months reported.

Michigan took the biggest economic hit among the large states, with its unemployment rate jumping 19.1 percent from February to April. Yet the medical damage the virus inflicted on the state is close to the 15-state average. This may indicate that the painful economic steps Michigan’s governor took had little benefit—or, at least no provable statistical connection to a benefit.

Looking for any statistical connection among the 50 states and D.C. with regards to virus case rates and age-adjusted death rates yields no link to the increase in unemployment, to average winter temperatures, or to international travelers as a share of the population—although the restrictions President Trump placed on international travel on January 31 likely mitigated this last factor.

A significant factor that does stand out in the virus’ spread, however, is the prevalence of mass transit in a state. Heavier reliance on mass transit is also statistically linked to population density, although urban areas in California and Texas offer an exception. At the state level, 28.0 percent of New Yorkers use mass transit to commute to work and so do 11.7 percent in New Jersey, compared to 4.9 percent in California and 0.6 percent in Texas.

Further, mass transit was declared an essential service. Thus, when New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo ordered nursing homes to accept COVID-19 patients, a policy now widely seen as a fatal error, that decision may have been compounded by the many health-care workers who commuted to those nursing homes on the subway, having caught the virus in the dark, damp, and poorly ventilated environment then becoming asymptomatic carriers.

While additional data will no doubt be discovered and analyzed for ideas as to how to best reduce the public health harm and economic damage from this and future pandemics, there appear to be strong indicators that one major policy initiative of the left could have a fatal result.

For instance, had the Green New Deal and its vision of a virtually carless future with trains, subways, and buses connecting densely packed transit-oriented developments been enacted 20 years ago, how bad might the nation’s virus losses have been so far? Social distancing and subway use are mutually exclusive—low passenger density defeats the purpose of the subway and any other mass transit system.

Given that New York’s age adjusted COVID fatality rate is 25 times higher than Texas’s, we can project that, instead of more than 95,000 deaths attributed to the virus, we might have suffered more than 1 million American dead.

Chuck DeVore is vice president of national initiatives at the Texas Public Policy Foundation and served in the California State Assembly from 2004 to 2010.

Major Flaw in Massive Property Tax Hike Exposed – State’s Small Businesses Get Hammered by Measure’s Higher Taxes!!!

Everybody loses if the Split Roll tax/ending of Prop. 13 for industrial and commercial properties.  When you raise the tax on property, it is the leaseholder and the customers that pay more.  That means fewer tenants and fewer purchases.  At a time we are trying to recover from the results of the government reaction to a virus, with 40 million out of work, to raise taxes makes sure California can not recover.

“Furthermore, the proposition defines the term “small business” so narrowly that it is virtually impossible for any small business to qualify for their so-called “small business” personal property tax exemption. In reality, this “small business exemption” is an illusion. Almost all businesses, no matter the size, the value of the property, or the number of employees, will pay higher property taxes or higher rents, as owners pass on the high property taxes to their small business renters.

“This is a challenging time for small businesses. The $12.5 billion-a-year property tax hike added to an already historic COVID-19 recession will only make any reopening and, in some cases, survival that much more difficult,” said Betty Jo Toccoli, president of the California Small Business Association. “The so-called ‘small business exemption’ touted by special interests does not exist. Nothing in this measure protects small businesses from the burden of higher property taxes and increased rents.”

The socialists behind this measure understand it will kill jobs and business—that is the goal. In this way more people will be dependent on government—and productive people will leave the State.  That meets the goals of Jerry Brown, to depopulate California.

Major Flaw in Massive Property Tax Hike Exposed – State’s Small Businesses Get Hammered by Measure’s Higher Taxes!!!
***

Half of all California Employees Work for a Small Business

Save Prop. 13,  5/26/20 

SACRAMENTO, CA – A coalition of small business advocates across California exposed a major flaw in the state proposition likely headed to the November ballot that will raise property taxes by up to $12.5 billion annually. Contrary to claims by the measure’s proponents, small businesses are not excluded from the property tax hike. The proposition hikes taxes on most business properties in the state. The size of the business – large or small – owning or occupying the property is irrelevant. Because of how the initiative is drafted, businesses across California will face higher real property taxes and soaring rents, at a time when hundreds of thousands struggle to reopen their doors and ask state and federal governments for relief.

Furthermore, the proposition defines the term “small business” so narrowly that it is virtually impossible for any small business to qualify for their so-called “small business” personal property tax exemption. In reality, this “small business exemption” is an illusion. Almost all businesses, no matter the size, the value of the property, or the number of employees, will pay higher property taxes or higher rents, as owners pass on the high property taxes to their small business renters.

“This is a challenging time for small businesses. The $12.5 billion-a-year property tax hike added to an already historic COVID-19 recession will only make any reopening and, in some cases, survival that much more difficult,” said Betty Jo Toccoli, president of the California Small Business Association. “The so-called ‘small business exemption’ touted by special interests does not exist. Nothing in this measure protects small businesses from the burden of higher property taxes and increased rents.”

Numerous studies, including those by the NAACP California, Berkeley Research Group and Pepperdine University conclude that most small businesses do not own the property on which they operate. Instead, they rent and have what is called a “triple net lease,” where property owners pass along property taxes, insurance, and maintenance costs directly to the tenants. The proposition does nothing to prevent a building owner from passing on its property tax increase through a triple net or other form of lease to its small business tenants once the building is reassessed.

“There is hardly any protection for small businesses in this flawed proposition. If we want small businesses to have a future in California, voters must reject this massive property tax hike in November,” concluded Nathan Ahle, president and CEO of the Fresno Chamber of Commerce. “For mom and pop businesses in the Central Valley operating on slim margins, the measure will force rents to skyrocket…and could mean the difference between declaring bankruptcy or making payroll.”

“Read the fine print before casting ballots this November,” said Dennis Huang, executive director and CEO of the Asian Business Association of Los Angeles. “The proponent’s claims that small businesses will not be impacted by the $12.5 billion-a-year property tax hike is smoke and mirrors designed to fool voters. Study after study has shown that small businesses pay higher rents and costs when property taxes increase.”

Claim after claim made by proponents’ disputed:
During the last few months, backers of the measure, including the president of the California Teachers Association, have gone so far as to say that they “made sure that small businesses and farms would not be unfairly impacted.” In a stark rebuttal, organizations across California impacted by the tax measure’s broad reach have called into question the accuracy of the proponents’ claims. In February, the California Farm Bureau Federation announced its opposition to the measure as it would result in higher property taxes on the improvements needed to bring food from farm to fork, such as barns, dairies and processing plants.  

Read more about the flaws in the $12.5 billion-a-year property tax hike here.

Democratic Rep. Omar says she believes Reade’s allegation against Biden

Joe Biden, if he remembered was running for President.  He has forgotten that he is not a slave Master, determining who is black and who is not.  He apparently, due to dementia, old age or guilt, forgot his sexual advances toward Tara Reade.  Shockingly, Rep. Ilhan Omar, who married her own brother to violate U.S. immigration laws—among others—believes Tara and NOT Joe.  How can she then support him for President?  It is going to get ugly.

“Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar says she believes the sexual assault allegations make against her party’s presidential nominee, Joe Biden, by a former Biden Senate staffer and suggests that she wouldn’t have made him the top Democratic candidate. 

The former staffer, Tara Reade, alleged in March that Biden sexually assaulted her in a Capitol Hill corridor in 1993. 

“I do believe Reade,” Omar told the British Sunday Times. “Justice can be delayed but should never be denied.”

If I were a betting person Biden will not be the Democrat nominee—his mental State, his gaffes, his historic fondling and groping  of little girls and women and now this.  Offensive to black Americans—that is enough for the adults in the Democrat Party to find an alternative.

Democratic Rep. Omar says she believes Reade’s allegation against Biden

Omar, a member of the “Squad” of freshmen female House members endorsed fellow progressive Bernie Sanders over Biden

By Joseph Weber, Just the News,  5/25/20 

Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar says she believes the sexual assault allegations make against her party’s presidential nominee, Joe Biden, by a former Biden Senate staffer and suggests that she wouldn’t have made him the top Democratic candidate. 

The former staffer, Tara Reade, alleged in March that Biden sexually assaulted her in a Capitol Hill corridor in 1993. 

“I do believe Reade,” Omar told the British Sunday Times. “Justice can be delayed but should never be denied.”

Omar, a Minnesota congresswoman, has since being elected in 2018 been among the most outspoken anti-establishment House Democrats, along with such fellow “Squad” members as Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. They each supported fellow progressive Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders over Biden in their 2020 race to win the Democratic nomination. 

Omar replied when asked by the Sunday Times whether Biden should be the nominee: “If considerations were something I had influence over, just candidly here, we’d probably have a different candidate.”

After the story was published Sunday, Omar suggested her quotes were taken out of context but nevertheless said she’ll vote for Biden, over President Trump. 

The Biden campaign immediately denied the Reade allegation, but Biden did not directly address it until a few weeks ago. The so-called “liberal media” was also slow to address the issue, sparking criticism about a double standard in the #Metoo Movement when perhaps a favorite is accused. 

However, the story now has broad national attention, most recently with Reade’s academic records being called into question and her attorney having resigned from the case late last week.