San Fran leads the list of the toughest cities in America for small business

Anybody surprised that a California city is the worst in the nation for small business?  Anybody surprised that city is San Fran?  This is the city where you have to step over the homeless and human feces to get a taco or go to a business meeting.  This is a town that on January 1 will BAN cars from the downtown area—making it really impossible for customers and clients to work with firms along Market Street.

Starting a business was just one of seven main categories — the other five being employing workers, getting electricity, paying taxes, getting credit, registering property and resolving insolvency — measured in the ASU report ranking cities based on the ease, or difficulty, of doing business within their borders. San Francisco lagged all U.S. cities in the ASU composite score, falling near the bottom in virtually every category measured.

As to the easiest U.S. city to start and operate a business, Oklahoma City topped the rankings. OKC fared well in all categories measured in the analysis, particularly when it came to business-friendly rules and requirements pertaining to employing workers, registering property and accessing electricity.”

Hint:  San Fran and California is run by Democrats—totally.  Oklahoma is run by Republicans—totally.  Which is better?  Is this why folks are fleeing San Fran and California?

San Francisco leads the list of the toughest cities in America for small business

By Craig M. Douglas, – Director, Editorial Research & Analysis, The Business Journals,  10/9/19 

San Francisco ranks statistically as the hardest city in the country to start and operate a business, according to a new study that looked at a range of factors including the difficulty of hiring employees and, stepping over regulatory hurdles as well as taxes and fees.

The findings by Arizona State University researchers were part of a broader analysis by the university on the ease of doing business in dozens of major North American cities dotting the United States, Canada and Mexico.

Little Rock, Arkansas, emerged from the study with the inglorious distinction as taking the longest time period to start a business, requiring entrepreneurs to complete at least 10 legal steps over 63 days on average to get a company off the ground. That timeline was roughly 50 percent longer than what it takes on average to start a business in San Francisco, which ranked second behind Little Rock in the time it takes to start a business.

In addition to measuring the number of legal requirements and days on average to start a business, the ASU report also considered required costs to secure a business license. At just over $1,000, Boston outranked all U.S. cities in terms of fees and related costs needed to hang a shingle. In fact, the Massachusetts capital was the only location in the ASU study where the required startup costs topped $1,000. Following Boston were Chicago at $833; Phoenix at $790; and Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, which both were roughly $720. The median was $230 in required fees and costs per city, according to ASU’s findings.

Starting a business was just one of seven main categories — the other five being employing workers, getting electricity, paying taxes, getting credit, registering property and resolving insolvency — measured in the ASU report ranking cities based on the ease, or difficulty, of doing business within their borders. San Francisco lagged all U.S. cities in the ASU composite score, falling near the bottom in virtually every category measured.

As to the easiest U.S. city to start and operate a business, Oklahoma City topped the rankings. OKC fared well in all categories measured in the analysis, particularly when it came to business-friendly rules and requirements pertaining to employing workers, registering property and accessing electricity.

The ASU analysis, “Doing Business in North America,” is modeled after a similar report compiled by The World Bank that since 2001 has evaluated the laws and costs of opening, operating and liquidating a business in major cities in every country in the world.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.