San Fran Rich Enough to Spend Tax $$ on Illegal Aliens—Does Not Need Federal $$–Cut Them Off

Thanks to the Mayor of San Fran grandstanding, to protect his Progressive credentials and illegal aliens, tens of millions of dollars are going to be withheld from the City for public safety, roads and welfare programs.  But Mayor Lee has made it clear that the city does not need the tax dollars from the people of Orlando, since he has upwards of $25 million to provide attorneys for drug dealers, human traffickers and assorted run fo the mill law breakers from foreign countries.

“Officials with the Department of Environment, for instance, have identified $1.3 million in federal funding in grants from the Department of Energy and one from the Environmental Protection Agency. The city department has a $21 million proposed budget.

The grants fund efforts around brownfield cleanup in the Bayview, solar capacity to power places like hardware stores or grocery stores in the event of a large scale power outage during an emergency, and electric vehicle infrastructure.

Mayor Lee has made his choice—protect criminals and allow the environmental needs of the city go unanswered—wonder what environmentalists think of this.  Lee’s choice and the people lose.

money bag

Federal funding in S.F. in limbo under Trump administration

San Francisco receives grants from the Department of Energy to fund efforts increasing solar capacity in the event of a large scale power outage, among other federal funds that are now in question because of San Francisco’s sanctuary status.

By Joshua Sabatini, SF Examiner,  1/31/17

After a little more than a week in office, President Donald Trump has triggered waves of protests throughout the U.S. including in San Francisco’s streets, outside of City Hall and at San Francisco International Airport over immigration policies and the uncertainty around them.

The national confusion has trickled down into city departments themselves, no matter how much or little they rely on federal funding that Trump last week threatened to cut for sanctuary cities like San Francisco.

Officials with the Department of Environment, for instance, have identified $1.3 million in federal funding in grants from the Department of Energy and one from the Environmental Protection Agency. The city department has a $21 million proposed budget.

The grants fund efforts around brownfield cleanup in the Bayview, solar capacity to power places like hardware stores or grocery stores in the event of a large scale power outage during an emergency, and electric vehicle infrastructure.

Department officials say this grant money is safe since the contracts are already signed and approved by the previous administration. The concern is the future.

Guillermo Rodriguez, a spokesperson for the Department of the Environment, said Monday that San Francisco has relied on federal funding for research and development on “forward thinking” policies.

“For places like San Francisco, they are an important piece of the overall puzzle,” Rodriguez said. “There is easy, low-hanging fruit that we can work on, like change out our light bulbs and turn off our computers at the end of the day. But if we are going to get to the big emissions that we need, we really need to be very creative in our policy thinking locally in order to push agendas that reduce greenhouse gas emissions.”

The concern remains whether the federal funding relied upon by the department will only come with conditions attached to immigration policy, or simply not at all.

“We don’t know what direction they are going to go in,” Rodriguez said of Trump’s administration.

Meanwhile, San Francisco has taken the position that Trump’s executive order signed last week to cut funding from sanctuary cities like San Francisco does not apply to it. San Francisco receives about $1 billion annually in federal funding.

The week before the order was executed and the day before Trump’s inauguration, head of Human Resources Micki Callahan sent a Jan. 19 memo to all city government employees outlining The City’s sanctuary laws while also noting that they “are consistent with federal law.”

But that exact point may become caught in legal wrangling, and there are also concerns future federal grants may come with conditions related to immigration policies — another legal point that could end up being decided by the courts.

The memo begins to the illustrate The City’s legal stance.

Federal law section 1373, on which Trump’s executive order is based, states that a “local government entity or official may not prohibit, or in any way restrict, any government entity or official from sending to, or receiving from, the Immigration and Naturalization Service information regarding the citizenship or immigration status, lawful or unlawful, of any individual.”

But The City says they have no law on the books restricting that transmission of information regarding immigration status.

The memo identifies six specific San Francisco sanctuary laws it says do not run afoul of that federal law such as the prohibition on using city funds for “any question regarding immigration status (other than those required by federal or state statute, regulation, or court decision) on any application, questionnaire, or interview form used in relation to benefits, services, or opportunities provided by the City.”

That’s why Sheriff Vicki Hennessy’s decision not to respond during the past six months to 41 requests by federal immigration officials to be notified of the release of undocumented inmates is, from The City’s perspective, not a violation of federal law.

On Monday, Hennessy along with Mayor Ed Lee and Police Chief William Scott jointly sent a letter to Department of Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly refusing to comply with Trump’s executive immigration orders and standing by The City’s sanctuary laws.

The letter said that by “pressing local jurisdictions to become entangled in federal immigration enforcement” public safety would be undermined by eroding community trust.

The letter seems to bolster The City’s legal argument by stating, “The United States Supreme Court and other federal courts have repeatedly emphasized that the administration of immigration laws is the responsibility of the federal government, not cities and states.”

While the Trump era has already caused much alarm, The City is still moving forward with routine plans to secure federal homeland security grants.

On Thursday, the Board of Supervisors Budget and Finance Committee will vote to authorize San Francisco to apply for homeland security grants. Last year, the 12-county Bay Area region received $23 million in federal homeland security grants distributed based on a risk-assessment analysis.

The local effort is spearheaded by the Department of Emergency Management. Kristin Hogan, the government affairs manager, said they are proceeding as they have in the past, but noted there is uncertainty.

“This is a yearly requirement. We are approaching it exactly as we have in the past,” Hogan said. “We can’t really predict the future, whether it will be less or more or any kind of changes to the grant. We are proceeding as business as usual. Everyone is waiting with bated breath to see what the next steps are.”

She added, “We are obviously paying very close attention and trying to get all the information we can as well, so we can be prepared if there are going to be changes.”

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.