San Fran to Allow 16 year olds to Vote?

The November ballot in San Fran will include a measure to allow 16 year olds to vote for DA, Mayor, school board and Board of Supervisors.  This joke will probably become law.  But does it matter?  The City has collapsed, significant parts of the city do not allow cars, the bus and train service is as reliable as those in Venezuela.  Businesses and the middle class has fled.  In fact, my guess unless they are homeless or runaways, there are not many 16 year old left in town.

““I really think that Vote 16 will help youth of color in San Francisco establish the habit of voting at an earlier age, and really provide them with the support and the resources that they need to continue building on that habit as they grow older,” said Crystal Chan, an 18-year old organizer for Vote 16 SF who fought to get the measure on the ballot.

If the proposition passes, San Francisco would become the first major American city to give 16- and 17-year-olds the right to vote in municipal elections. But the question remains: what would be improved by lowering the voting age by just two years?

Note the racist statement—that kids of color will learn to vote.  Another example of Democrat bigotry.  They do not want white kids to vote and they think black kids are too stupid to want to vote.  Hatred is behind this, not good government.  But this is San Fran, it does not matter.  It is a dead city.

A major American city may soon allow 16-year-olds to vote — and others could follow suit

If the proposition passes, San Francisco would become the first large city to give 16- and 17-year-olds the right to vote in local elections.

By Haley Talbot and Julie Tsirkin, NBC News.  9/12/20 

San Francisco residents will be casting ballots in November to determine not just who should be in the White House, but if the city should be allowing 16- and 17-year-olds to vote in local elections.

A similar measure introduced in 2016 narrowly failed with 48 percent of the vote, but local activists and organizers are confident that it will pass this time.

“I really think that Vote 16 will help youth of color in San Francisco establish the habit of voting at an earlier age, and really provide them with the support and the resources that they need to continue building on that habit as they grow older,” said Crystal Chan, an 18-year old organizer for Vote 16 SF who fought to get the measure on the ballot.

If the proposition passes, San Francisco would become the first major American city to give 16- and 17-year-olds the right to vote in municipal elections. But the question remains: what would be improved by lowering the voting age by just two years?

“Research is clear on this, that voting is a habit. And 16 is a better time than 18 to establish that habit,” Brandon Klugman, Vote 16’s campaign manager, told NBC News. “Our motivation here first and foremost is to make sure that we put new voters in a position to establish that habit in the first election they’re eligible for, and then to continue participating throughout their lives which is good for democracy on every level.”

While this debate is getting renewed attention, some cities have allowed people as young as 16 to vote in local elections for years — like Takoma Park, Maryland, where city officials say they’ve seen positive results since its implementation in 2013, pointing to increased youth engagement and higher turnout.

“I hear from a lot of people around the country who are interested, a lot of young people but also people who are not young, who are interested in adopting this in their communities,” said Jessie Carpenter, a Takoma Park city clerk.

At the federal level, lowering the voting age has not picked up the same traction, but the initiative does have some bipartisan support in the halls of Congress.

Congresswoman Grace Meng, D-NY, has long advocated for the issue and introduced a constitutional amendment in 2018 to lower the voting age nationwide to 16.

“I’m always inspired by our nation’s youth who have demonstrated wisdom, maturity and passion on issues like social justice, gun control, and climate change,” Meng said in a statement. “They are the leaders of our future and the decisions we make impact their lives every day. To capture their views and experiences, we must lower the voting age to 16 in all elections.”

Rep Ayanna Pressley, D-Mass., introduced an amendment to HR 1 — the For the People Act — in 2019, to lower the federal voting age to 16. The amendment received 126 votes including one Republican, Texas Rep. Michael Burgess, a member of the Rules Committee who said it struck a chord with him.

“Here’s the point: would policymakers pay more attention to the problems that are being dealt to this segment of the demographic if policymakers were actually answerable to them? I think it is worth having the discussion,” Burgess said in March of 2019.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. sixteen year olds don’t have enough brains or experience to vote. Most eighteen year olds don’t either. The voting age should never have been lowered in the first place. Sixteen year olds are not mature enough to be allowed to smoke buy booze or buy a gun or even get married. eighteen year olds get most of the same list. So why would anyone think they are mature enough to choose who should be in office

  2. William Hicks says

    A HISTORY OF 18 YEAR OLDS VOTING…….For those who were not adults when 18 year olds were allowed to vote let me tell you why they were allowed to vote. It was all due to the Vietnam war when “allegedly” you could be drafted but not vote for the people who could conscript you into military service. OK, they made a point and now 18 year olds can vote regardless of not being at a mature enough age to vote intelligently.

    NOW, we have an all volunteer military force. No one is drafted into military service. My question is….do we go back to 21 as the earliest year you qualify to vote, and if the answer is no, why not?

  3. Used to be one could get a driver’s license at 16. Not any more. Not for the general public. It was thought these kids weren’t mature enough to make good decisions while driving.

    But somehow they are able to make good decisions that affect millions of other people?

    Not on your life. The voting age should probably be RAISED to 21, minimum.

    Nothing but a communist/democrat ploy to get the mush-brained kids voting for the far-left.

  4. Hormones are still dictating at 18, and they rationalize 16 is good?

    At 21 I started to vote, and thought I knew it. at 30 I realized just how little I understood at 21, let alone 18.

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