San Luis Obispo County to Join Orgy of Tax Increases on November Ballots

The County of Los Angeles wants a $120 billion tax increase “for roads” on the November ballot.  The Democrats want an extension of the current “temporary sales and income tax expansion, for twelve years at a cost of up to $108 billion.  San Diego is looking at over $100 billion in new long term taxes.  My own Simi Valley schools are looking for between $200-500 million (whatever the traffic will bear) for a district that consistently loses 3% of it enrollment—just closed a couple of schools and really need to close five more.

Richmond is looking for $100 million in bonds, to provide housing for teachers.  Think of a reason and you will find a tax or bond.  Heck, in SLO they want to spend $33 million on bike and walking trails!!

“Regional projects would get another 25 percent of the total pie, including projects to control congestion along certain stretches of Highways 101, 1 and 227.

Bike and pedestrian projects would get 15 percent for regional connectors including the City-to-the-Sea/Bob Jones Trail, and the Atascadero/Templeton and Morro Bay/Cayucos connectors.

The final 10 percent would be used for public transportation projects, including those targeting seniors, veterans and persons with disabilities.”

There is no other word for it.  California Government is in the throes of a Tax and Bond ORGY.  What do you call it?

government-vote

SLO County leaders show support for placing proposed sales tax measure on November ballot

By KCBX Newsroom, 4/7/16

Future funding for major road improvement projects—like the recently-completed Los Osos Valley Road/Highway 101 interchange in San Luis Obispo—is drying up as gas tax revenues shrink.

Plans are moving forward to put a San Luis Obispo County-wide, half-cent sales tax measure on the November 2016 ballot.

The San Luis Obispo Council of Governments (SLOCOG) voted 10-to-1 Wednesday night in favor of the proposal. The only vote against it came from County Supervisor Debbie Arnold. Absent from the meeting was Supervisor Lynn Compton.

The estimated $225-million generated by the tax over nine years would pay for road repairs and improvements, as well as bicycle and pedestrian safety and connectivity projects. It would also be used for preserving the area’s public transit system.

State revenues for these types of funds are generated by a gas tax and have been falling sharply in recent years as more fuel efficient cars work into the market. This leaves many local projects without any funding.

SLOCOG Executive Director Ron De Carli told KCBX the money generated by this tax is absolutely protected and would be used entirely for local projects.

“If the voters approve this package of investments, it can not be taken by the state, it can not be taken by the feds, it is under local control,” De Carli said. “We’d have a variety of safeguards that have annual audits to make sure money is being spent as recognized and approved by the voters.”

The plan now goes to the individual cities for consideration. After a back-and-forth between those cities and SLOCOG, the measure would eventually end up in front of the County Board of Supervisors for a vote, which is the final step before it can end up on the November ballot.

Half of all the funds raised would be controlled by local jurisdictions. They’re percentages of that portion are as follows:

  • Arroyo Grande – 6.9%
  • Atascadero – 10.8%
  • Grover Beach – 5.5%
  • Morro Bay – 4.6%
  • Paso Robles – 11.3%
  • Pismo Beach – 3.7%
  • San Luis obispo – 16.3%
  • SLO County – 40.8%

Regional projects would get another 25 percent of the total pie, including projects to control congestion along certain stretches of Highways 101, 1 and 227.

Bike and pedestrian projects would get 15 percent for regional connectors including the City-to-the-Sea/Bob Jones Trail, and the Atascadero/Templeton and Morro Bay/Cayucos connectors.

The final 10 percent would be used for public transportation projects, including those targeting seniors, veterans and persons with disabilities.

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.