Socialism Kills Jobs—NYC Restaurants and Amazon

You better visit New York City soon if you are looking for world class food—instead of hot dogs from a street vendor and pizza made in sloppy places.  Thanks to tax and unemployment policies long time, well known world class restaurants are forced to close in New York.  This is a lesson being learned in Seattle—will California cities face this soon?

“Like thousands of others, my son Luke recently left New York after 16 years to return to our Colorado mountain community. The cost of living, the filth, the notorious New York attitude, the nanny-state tax-and-spend politics, and the decrepit subway all played a part. There was also its war on the Second Amendment — despite a Colorado concealed carry permit, a New York City long gun permit, and that, as an armorer, he equipped filmmakers with firearms, Luke was denied a pistol premise permit. Perhaps that was his last straw, but for his mother and me it was the shuttering of restaurants where, after camping on the sofa in his basement apartment, we splurged for excellent meals. Most of the worthwhile restaurants are gone. Time to leave.”

The idea of higher taxes, more employment mandates and regulations are killing jobs and businesses.  Progressives in Washington, New York and Sacramento are working hard to make the United States and California, another Venezuela.

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Get out of New York, all the good restaurants are closed

by William Perry Pendley, Washington Examiner,  2/16/19

 

Like thousands of others, my son Luke recently left New York after 16 years to return to our Colorado mountain community. The cost of living, the filth, the notorious New York attitude, the nanny-state tax-and-spend politics, and the decrepit subway all played a part. There was also its war on the Second Amendment — despite a Colorado concealed carry permit, a New York City long gun permit, and that, as an armorer, he equipped filmmakers with firearms, Luke was denied a pistol premise permit. Perhaps that was his last straw, but for his mother and me it was the shuttering of restaurants where, after camping on the sofa in his basement apartment, we splurged for excellent meals. Most of the worthwhile restaurants are gone. Time to leave.

The first to go was Artisanal Fromagerie & Bistro, listed at 2 Park Ave., but really around the corner and down darkened 32nd Street. A short distance from Luke’s Murray Hill residence, its “playful twists to classic French brasserie dishes” drew a reviewer’s praise, but we went for cheese and dessert fondues, massive cheeseburgers, and creative desserts. We were delighted when, in late 2015, it announced a move to a larger location south on Park Avenue. Sadly, in spring 2017, three months before its grand reopening, it filed for bankruptcy, the victim of construction and architectural issues and a purported $3 million debt in unpaid rent.

Next was legendary (since 1937) Carnegie Deli, north of the theater district on Seventh Avenue. It was touristy, noisy, and crowded, and real New Yorkers preferred Katz’s on Houston, but its corned beef and pastrami, especially in the famed “Woody Allen” (I added Swiss cheese), could not be beat. The New York media relished the intrigue that led to its closing: rumors of an affair, a stolen recipe, a nasty divorce, and the illegal siphoning of natural gas for most of a decade. We discovered its death spiral one night after seeing the Broadway play, “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time,” when we arrived to read its “temporarily closed” sign.

Primehouse, a high-end steakhouse at 27th and Park, was a worthy, celebratory splurge, right after renting a new apartment, always a Herculean crap shoot in New York, or moving an 80-pound tabletop and an apartment full of furniture up four flights of stairs, or a birthday. We never ate steak there because its cheeseburgers were delicious and colossal, but everyone packed in around us did, along with ample wine and drinks. Thus, we were shocked one day to walk up and find it closed. According to a waitress at an affiliated restaurant, despite the constant traffic and high prices, it could no longer afford Manhattan’s ever-escalating rent.

We found a worthy replacement, an “upscale steakhouse” in nearby Gramercy, BLT Prime New York. There we did dine on the steaks, which were excellent, as were the fries, onion rings, macaroni and cheese, and revolving, creative-but-hearty desserts. It was less noisy than its midtown cousin, where expense account hedge fund types enjoyed themselves a little too much. Sadly, last month, returning to New York City, we learned that days before Christmas it closed “due to ongoing construction and scaffolding,” an ubiquitous feature of New York City buildings, and the “prohibitive costs of rising New York City rent.”

Undaunted, we always have our favorite site of celebratory meals, including birthdays, weddings, and graduation — the Blue Water Grill on Union Square. Made famous by a Coen Brothers movie, “Burn After Reading,” it was excellent for more than a decade before as a “warm, jazzy American restaurant.” It featured seafood (the raw bar was extensive, but the Ginger-Soy Lacquered Chilean Sea Bass was my favorite), an excellent filet mignon, and creative specialties all topped off for us by the hard-to-find chocolate lava cake. As we readied our reservation, we learned it closed New Year’s Day, unable to afford a $2 million annual rent increase.

A few favorites remain. The Doughnut Plant in the Chelsea Hotel, “the best doughnuts in the world,” was a breakfast locale despite dingy, decades-old scaffolding that turned it into a cave. Serendipity 3, in an Upper East Side townhouse since 1954, decadent desserts, such as the “Frrrozen Hot Chocolate” and towering sundaes, was perfect for after dinner if we made month-in-advance reservations or timed our arrival to avoid the three-hour wait. For dinner, there is delectable Hometown Barbeque in Brooklyn.

On reflection, should I be devouring doughnuts, or scoffing three-scoop hot fudge sundaes at all, or savoring Western BBQ in the Big Apple?

It was great while it lasted. I feel sorry for visitors embarking on the foodie search we began nearly two decades ago, but I empathize with the young men and women now displaced from restaurant jobs, between auditions and dreams, because of what has happened to New York City. Given the daily developments from Mayor Bill de Blasio’s office, it will only get worse.

William Perry Pendley (@Sagebrush_Rebel) is a contributor to the Washington Examiner’s Beltway Confidential blog. He is an attorney and author of Sagebrush Rebel: Reagan’s Battle with Environmental Extremists and Why It Matters Today.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.