Students demand fee reduction after university goes online over coronavirus

You pay good money for room/board, class time and meetings with professors, face to face.  Or at least a college student can meet with a Teachers Assist or Grad student to get information and clarification.  Thanks to the coronavirus, college education for the next few weeks or more will be by the Internet.  You can get your education from your parent’s living room, a Starbucks (if you want to go out) or a bar.

So, why pay the enormous tuition and other costs if you are not getting the service/product?  Now students at UC San Diego are demanding a portion of their money back.  The real news is that education can happen via distance learning, brick and mortar in many cases is no longer needed.  Another reason to vote NO on school and university bond measures.  Government education is still operating as if this was 1920, not 2020.  Every other industry has modernized—the corona virus could force colleges to do the same.

“As for the petition at UC San Diego, it was started by student Jessica Liang and “argues that the university should lower certain student fees that amount to $4,817.22 for in-state students and $14,735.22 for out of state students. The fees include tuition, transportation, student activities, and events,” the UCSD Guardian reports.

Liang explained to the student newspaper that since spring 2020 classes have moved online “I found a lot of UCSD students complained about that … they think it is not worth [it] to pay such high tuition for online classes.”

Why pay a fee for “events” when they are being cancelled, you never wanted to attend the hate America rally, financed by mandatory student fees? 

Photo courtesy of 401(K) 2013, Flickr

Students demand fee reduction after university goes online over coronavirus

Jennifer Kabbany, The College Fix,  3/13/20    

Questions about refunds and travel assistance also continue to mount

Some 12,000 people have signed a petition demanding that UC San Diego officials reduce their fees in the wake of the decision to move spring quarter classes online over the coronavirus.

The petition comes as more students and parents across the nation are asking what the shift from on campus to online classes amid the coronavirus contaminant means for their wallets.

Questions regarding partial housing and meal plan refunds, as well as assistance with spur-of-the-moment travel plans as college students are asked to leave their dorms, have also increased.

As for the petition at UC San Diego, it was started by student Jessica Liang and “argues that the university should lower certain student fees that amount to $4,817.22 for in-state students and $14,735.22 for out of state students. The fees include tuition, transportation, student activities, and events,” the UCSD Guardian reports.

Liang explained to the student newspaper that since spring 2020 classes have moved online “I found a lot of UCSD students complained about that … they think it is not worth [it] to pay such high tuition for online classes.”

The issue has struck a nerve. Another UCSD student tweeted out her story as well:

Beyond UC San Diego, similar thoughts are playing out.

“I’m paying for in-person classes and it’s possible that half of this semester is going to be online,” UC Berkeley senior Sydney Ghoreishi told The College Fix this week. “Frustrating, but I’d rather not have corona. What I’d really like to see is some kind of refund.”

UC Berkeley has suspended most in-person classes through March 29.

Many universities across the nation have begun to post FAQs to handle the growing number of questions regarding what the switch to online means for tuition bills and possible refunds, and many answers remain forthcoming.

Boston.com reports that the many colleges in the area are handling the crisis in different ways, prompting one commenter to opine: “The universities should have to refund a full semester of both tuition and room and board or offer full credit for another semester. Students did not enroll for nor pay for online courses. For many students that is not possible – those in art, theater and music courses for instance. Then there are students taking courses with labs. It was the universities’ decision to over react and shut down, they should bear the cost of their decision.”

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

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