Teamsters, others seek to unionize 10,000 potential workers entering the legal cannabis market

Will the unions do to the marijuana industry what it has done to the steel, auto, agriculture industries—make it expensive and kill them off.  We already have 15% of California crops being harvesting by machines, not humans.  This number goes up as Trump cracks down on illegal aliens, the minimum wage goes up and technology kills off the need to pay bribes to unions.

The Associated Press reports that at least three major unions, the Teamsters, the United Food and Commercial Workers and the United Farm Workers, are all beginning outreach efforts to sound out the possibility of unionizing what’s estimated to eventually be a workforce of 10,000 people.

“Labor leaders estimate recreational pot in California could employ at least 100,000 workers from the north coast to the Sierra Nevada foothills and the San Joaquin Valley, harvesting and trimming the plants, extracting ingredients to put in liquids and edibles, and driving it to stores and front doors,” the AP reports. “Other pot workers have organized in other states, but California should be especially friendly territory for unions.”

We know that unions push up the cost of products.  Should the legal marijuana industry become unionized, expect the black market to flourish—high taxes-in the range of 45% in total, government quality pot—not consumer quality, high cost of permits and inspections.  The Mexican cartels may be behind the unionization effort—since they will prosper under it.

Union

Teamsters, others seek to unionize 10,000 potential workers entering the legal cannabis market

Multiple unions are eyeing the thousands of new workers poised to enter California’s booming retail marijuana market.

 

By Riley McDermid, San Francisco Business Times, 12/26/17

Multiple unions are eyeing the thousands of new workers poised to enter California’s booming retail marijuana market when it becomes legal on Jan. 1 and sales begin statewide.

The Associated Press reports that at least three major unions, the Teamsters, the United Food and Commercial Workers and the United Farm Workers, are all beginning outreach efforts to sound out the possibility of unionizing what’s estimated to eventually be a workforce of 10,000 people.

“Labor leaders estimate recreational pot in California could employ at least 100,000 workers from the north coast to the Sierra Nevada foothills and the San Joaquin Valley, harvesting and trimming the plants, extracting ingredients to put in liquids and edibles, and driving it to stores and front doors,” the AP reports. “Other pot workers have organized in other states, but California should be especially friendly territory for unions.”

When retail marijuana becomes legal in the state, entrepreneurs are hoping to be ready to do business almost immediately, leaving many business owners wondering how they should structure employee benefits, scheduling and other workplace needs. That’s where unions might come in, labor leaders told the news service.

“If you’re a cannabis worker, the UFW wants to talk with you,” national Vice President Armando Elenes told the AP.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.