Tech workers making six-figures or more sound off about barely ‘making ends meet’ in S.F.

San Fran is a disaster—making $160,000 in that city is poverty level and making one million a year does not guarantee you can afford a house!

“Last September, a former Facebook employee who was making a six-figure salary at his dream job said in a blog post on Vox that he quit and moved to Arizona because he and his four-member family could no longer afford to live in the Bay Area.

“The big problem for me was that Facebook has made the strategic decision to only open engineering offices in places where it believes it can attract the best talent. Somewhere along the way, Facebook decided this can only mean top-tier markets: Silicon Valley, Seattle, New York City, Boston, London,” Matt Kulka, who was an operations team member for Facebook for five years, wrote in his blog post.

That decision will ultimately cost it more talent, he suggested, as employees grow older and have families but can’t find housing that is affordable enough to house them that is close to work. The issue is a common one with workers who are struggling to find a balance between skyrocketing Bay Area housing costs and the price of raising a growing family, all while juggling sometimes inordinate commute times.”

Is California committing suicide with its economic, environmental and cultural/education policies?  The middle class is already fleeing the State.  Large corporations are leaving—could the rich be starting their determination to live in a responsible State?  Texas is wonderful—and it has a very responsible State government.  Sacramento is run by the Socialist Party that hates freedom and success—at some point even the Zuckerbergs will realize how much they have hurt real people.

San Francisco, CA, USA

Tech workers making six-figures or more sound off about barely ‘making ends meet’ in S.F.

By Riley McDermid, San Francisco Business Times, 3/1/17

A Twitter engineer is making international news for complaining in a recent media profile that he can barely make ends meet in San Francisco on his salary of $160,000.

“I didn’t become a software engineer to be trying to make ends meet,” the engineer, who spoke the condition of anonymity, told the Guardian in the piece.

A separate digital marketer chimed in that she and her partner can barely get by in San Francisco on combined salaries of over $1 million, saying they “make over $1 million between us, but we can’t afford a house.”

“This is part of where the American dream is not working out here,” the digital marketer said.

The Twitter engineer told the British paper that his largest expense is the $3,000 rent he pays a month, an amount that is still below the $3,270 average rent for a one bedroom in San Francisco, according to housing site Zumper.

“Families are priced out of the market,” he told the paper, adding that much of the affordable family businesses in his neighborhood have been displaced by “hip coffee shops.”

Last September, a former Facebook employee who was making a six-figure salary at his dream job said in a blog post on Vox that he quit and moved to Arizona because he and his four-member family could no longer afford to live in the Bay Area.

“The big problem for me was that Facebook has made the strategic decision to only open engineering offices in places where it believes it can attract the best talent. Somewhere along the way, Facebook decided this can only mean top-tier markets: Silicon Valley, Seattle, New York City, Boston, London,” Matt Kulka, who was an operations team member for Facebook for five years, wrote in his blog post.

That decision will ultimately cost it more talent, he suggested, as employees grow older and have families but can’t find housing that is affordable enough to house them that is close to work. The issue is a common one with workers who are struggling to find a balance between skyrocketing Bay Area housing costs and the price of raising a growing family, all while juggling sometimes inordinate commute times.

“All of these areas have tremendous costs of living, especially when it comes to real estate. Unless you’re coming in as a top-level engineer at the company, the company requires you relocate to a city with an engineering office,” Kulka wrote.

The complaints of high-paid tech workers who found living in the city too hard on their pocket books met with some push back from local housing advocates in the piece, who said that there are many more local residents facing graver housing consequences — on much lower or nonexistent incomes.

“For a senior whose healthcare is down the street, moving might be a death sentence,” Fred Sherburn Zimmer from San Francisco’s Housing Rights Committee. “For an immigrant family with two kids, moving out of a sanctuary city like San Francisco means you could get deported.”

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.