The Shipyard, San Fran’s largest development, faces years of delays after alleged fake soil testing

In California you can not look at a city or a project without fraud, corruption or incompetence involved.  Project like the choo coo to nowhere have all three.  Now we find how easy it is to commit fraud in the San Fran area.  For twelve years fraudulent soil testing had been going on.  In that time why didn’t the government find this?  Why didn’t the contractor find this?  The answer is obvious—corruption.

“The San Francisco Shipyard, the city’s largest active development, faces years of potential delays after the U.S. Navy said nearly half of soil tests may have been faked over 12 years. The Navy plans to retest a 408-acre site for radiation and other contamination, NBC reported on Tuesday.

Contractor Tetra Tech Inc. (NASDAQ: TTEK) was awarded a $300 million contract to test and clean up the former shipyard, but soil was found to be improperly tested in 2012. Curbed reported that in the past year, the Navy concluded that almost half of the cleanup may have been faked.

Tetra Tech denied the allegations of a “cover up of fraud” last June and said two employees were responsible for “inaccurate” samples. The company referred request for comment to the Navy, which didn’t immediately respond.”

Who are these people and firms, who actually owns them?  Has anyone search other projects they are doing for similar fraud?  Why not?

ShakingHandsWithMoney

The Shipyard, San Francisco’s largest development, faces years of delays after alleged fake soil testing

 

By Roland Li, San Francisco Business Times, 1/30/18

The San Francisco Shipyard, the city’s largest active development, faces years of potential delays after the U.S. Navy said nearly half of soil tests may have been faked over 12 years. The Navy plans to retest a 408-acre site for radiation and other contamination, NBC reported on Tuesday.

Contractor Tetra Tech Inc. (NASDAQ: TTEK) was awarded a $300 million contract to test and clean up the former shipyard, but soil was found to be improperly tested in 2012. Curbed reported that in the past year, the Navy concluded that almost half of the cleanup may have been faked.

Tetra Tech denied the allegations of a “cover up of fraud” last June and said two employees were responsible for “inaccurate” samples. The company referred request for comment to the Navy, which didn’t immediately respond.

The Shipyard, in the Hunters Point neighborhood, is the city’s largest development with more than 12,000 approved homes and 4 million square feet of commercial space.

Developer FivePoint Holdings LLC (NYSE: FPH) said in its last quarterly SEC filing that it doesn’t expect the Navy to transfer any more land until 2019 to 2022. The developer had previously expected 90 acres to be transferred this year.

Hunters Point Shipyard by FivePoint

 

FivePoint is now focusing on commercial development on 28 acres that it and the city already controls, said Kofi Bonner, regional president of Northern California at FivePoint.

“Our goal is to create a continuity that connects the completed homes on the hilltop and the first commercial buildings that we are planning,” said Bonner in a statement.

Bradley Angel, executive director of Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice, a community group that has been critical of the cleanup, wants the Navy to hire an independent investigator. He accused the Navy of a “cover up” of the soil testing issues for years.

“They need to do a proper investigation,” said Angel. “Hundreds of millions of dollars have been thrown down the toilet. That’s unacceptable.”

Angel also wants the land where homes have already been built to be retested, as well as soil at the Treasure Island redevelopment, where Tetra Tech was also hired by the Navy to do testing.

“I don’t trust anything Tetra Tech did,” he said.

Greenaction has filed a complaint with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to revoke Tetra Tech’s license. Greenaction was one of the groups that unsuccessfully sued the city and original developer Lennar (NYSE: LEN) over the Shipyard’s approvals.

The city’s Office of Community Investment and Infrastructure didn’t immediately return requests for comment. The Navy is holding a community event on the cleanup on Wednesday.

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.