UC Tuition Goes Up—to Help Finance Legal Support for Illegal Aliens

This is something you did not see in the headlines, on the local news or as part of the report on the increased UC tuition. We know that most of that money is going toward the unsustainable UC pension system, to keep the checks to retirees flowing. Now we find out the resources of students, professors, classrooms, libraries and other government assets, meant for the education of our students is instead being used to provide legal assistance to illegal aliens—to keep them in this country, get loans, welfare and scholarships.

You thought the UC system was teaching honesty—instead it is a sleazy corrupt operation providing law violators assistance so they can continue to violate our laws.

“The Undocumented Student Legal Services Center—a pilot project announced on Nov. 21 by University of California President Janet Napolitano—is the first legal assistance program designed to aid students across a university system rather than on a single campus, said dean Kevin Johnson. If the pilot is successful, administrators hope the program can be replicated by other university systems.

“We’re trying to figure out how best to address the needs of undocumented students at these other campuses,” Johnson said. “One of the things these students fear is getting a traffic ticket and ending up in removal proceedings. It’s a difficult existence and we want to do what we can to make things a little easier for them.”

Napolitano is the former Homeland Security Secretary that opened the borders, took guards from the borders and created the climate for the newest surge of criminals from foreign nations.

Photo courtesy The National Guard, flickr.

Photo courtesy The National Guard, flickr.

California Campuses To Aid Undocumented Students

Karen Sloan, The National Law Journal, 12/4/14

Undocumented students at six of the University of California’s 10 campuses will soon have access to free legal help under a new program spearheaded by the University of California, Davis School of Law.

The Undocumented Student Legal Services Center—a pilot project announced on Nov. 21 by University of California President Janet Napolitano—is the first legal assistance program designed to aid students across a university system rather than on a single campus, said dean Kevin Johnson. If the pilot is successful, administrators hope the program can be replicated by other university systems.

“We’re trying to figure out how best to address the needs of undocumented students at these other campuses,” Johnson said. “One of the things these students fear is getting a traffic ticket and ending up in removal proceedings. It’s a difficult existence and we want to do what we can to make things a little easier for them.”

University of California officials said earlier this year that about 2,000 undocumented students are in the system.

California Assembly Bill 540, signed into law in 2001, allows undocumented students to pay in-state tuition at the state’s public universities, though those students do not qualify for federal loans.

The center, expected to open in the spring, will operate under the umbrella of Davis’ immigration law clinic. The school plans to hire up to four recent Davis law graduates with an interest in immigration law as fellows for one year, with an option to extend a second year. The fellows will counsel undocumented students under the supervision of more experienced attorneys, said law professor Leticia Saucedo. Funding for the initiative is coming from Napolitano’s office, not the law school.

Napolitano has tasked the center with helping students at the University of California’s Merced, San Francisco, Santa Cruz, Santa Barbara, San Diego and Riverside campuses. The four other U.C. campuses with law schools are not part of the pilot, as some of them already offer assistance to undocumented students, but they could be brought into the effort after the initial phase, Saucedo said.

The center’s fellows will assist undocumented students with Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) applications, visa applications, and the new deferred action program announced this month by President Obama.

“There has been a real concern among some DACA applicants about the nature of the relief, how long that will last, and what could happen when a new president comes in,” Johnson said.

The center grew out of a recommendation from the President’s Advisory Committee on Undocumented Students, which formed earlier this year to examine the needs of undocumented students.

“This pilot program is just the beginning,” said Napolitano in her announcement of the program. “We want to create a model for other U.C. campuses and universities across the nation to provide legal representation for undocumented students on their campuses.”
 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.