Unions vow new approach to fighting initiatives similar to California’s Prop 22

Just because the unions lost Prop. 22 does not mean they will not get the wholly owned Democrat legislature to pass more punitive legislation to kill off Uber and Lyft.

“But labor organizers indicate they are considering a different approach after losing the vote, to look for similar ballot measures being proposed in other states to better organize to defeat them.

“Tuesday’s vote has given labor organizers a blueprint of how voters in other states might respond to similar proposals,” NBC News reports. “They are already thinking about how they can make their case for workers more palatable to voters.”

Steve Smith, a spokesman for the California Labor Federation, told NBC News that organizing against any ballot measures like Proposition 22 “will intensify and spread to other states that may face similar battles with the companies in the future.”

This is an ongoing fight between the rights and freedoms of the workers vs. the socialistic monopolies of the unions.  The GOP needs to take a very tough stand on this.

Unions vow new approach to fighting initiatives similar to California’s Prop 22

By Bethany Blankley | The Center Square. 11/6/20 

(The Center Square) – California voters approved Proposition 22 on Tuesday, which permits app-based rideshare and delivery companies to hire drivers as independent contractors, reversing requirements stipulated in AB-5, a new law that went into effect Jan. 1.

As part of the state constitution, drivers are now protected from legislative or judicial efforts to curtail how, when and where they work. They can decide when, where, and how much work they want to perform, keeping their “independent contractor” status, instead of “employee” status. The new constitutional amendment also provides independent-contractor drivers with other compensation, unless certain criteria are met.

It was passed in response to AB-5, over which a lawsuit remains ongoing between the state and rideshare companies Uber and Lyft.

“AB 5 is a nightmare law that made it illegal for hundreds of thousands of freelancers to earn a living,” Tom Manzo, president and founder of the California Business and Industrial Alliance, said. “Luckily, the people of California delivered a verdict against it and in favor of the gig economy – speaking louder than the paid politicians and union interests that stuck us with AB 5 in the first place. Passing Prop 22 is the first step toward reversing the havoc this misguided law has wreaked in our state, and ensuring innovation and entrepreneurship have a chance at survival in California.”

After the vote, DoorDash Chief Executive Officer Tony Xu said the company was focused on “looking ahead and across the country, ready to champion new benefits structures that are portable, proportional, and flexible.”

DoorDash, which is seeking to find a “third way” to define employee/employer relationships, joined Lyft, Uber and others in a $205 million campaign to get the measure passed.

But labor organizers indicate they are considering a different approach after losing the vote, to look for similar ballot measures being proposed in other states to better organize to defeat them.

“Tuesday’s vote has given labor organizers a blueprint of how voters in other states might respond to similar proposals,” NBC News reports. “They are already thinking about how they can make their case for workers more palatable to voters.”

Steve Smith, a spokesman for the California Labor Federation, told NBC News that organizing against any ballot measures like Proposition 22 “will intensify and spread to other states that may face similar battles with the companies in the future.”

Those attempts also likely will be dead on arrival, National Right to Work Committee president Mark Mix, told the Center Square.

“California voters’ strong rejection of union bosses’ master plan to reclassify rideshare drivers so they can be forced under one-size fits-all union monopoly contracts and mandatory dues payments should put lawmakers everywhere on notice: Americans want rideshare drivers to work freely on their own terms and unhindered by any union boss coercion,” Mix said.

The National Right to Work Committee’s sister organization, the National Right to Work Legal Defense Foundation, has won numerous lawsuits nationwide protecting worker’s rights. The foundation provides “free legal aid to employees whose human or civil rights have been violated by compulsory unionism abuses,” most notably winning the 2018 landmark Supreme Court Case, Janus v AFSCME, along with the Illinois-based Liberty Justice Center.

“If voters in California, a state whose legislature is practically run by Big Labor, voted to free rideshare drivers from the from the AB5 regime designed to force them into union ranks, elected officials everywhere should take notice and roll back, not expand, union boss forced unionism schemes,” Mix added.

So far, lawmakers in Connecticut, Illinois, New Jersey, New York, Oregon and Washington have introduced similar legislation to California’s Ab-5, although California’s is the most restrictive, according to an analysis published by Reuters. Massachusetts sued Lyft and Uber in July claiming they had misclassified their drivers’ employee status.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. Uber and Lyft are relatively inexpensive in comparison to the other alternatives, so I have to wonder why the governments of the people, by the people, and for the people have such a hard time swallowing the idea that their constituents actually like the idea of getting from here to there without actually having to mortgage their house. I’m sure money could have nothing to do with it.

    • I feel that I am stepping out on a limb being a liberal voter posting to a conservative thread, but I really need to comment on this issue. First, the distinction between independent contractor and employee is absolutely critical to our legal system. An IC is akin to an American citizen. IC’s are to have all the rights and freedoms of individuals engaged in marketplace activity, and which employees only have under certain circumstances. The unions, believe it or not, are doing conservatives a favor by fighting Proposition 22. Uber, Lyft, and other gig platforms are gaming the American way of life that cherishes individual freedoms. Prop 22 allows gig-work platforms to treat you as less than a citizen. In other words, Prop 22 allows a private individual to not treat you as equal under the law. But, to be aware of that, you’d have to be familiar with Supreme Court history and why the ABC Test was established in the first place. The ABC Test has nothing to do with the government usurping your rights. The California legislature was, quite literally, trying to protect your freedoms. Californians just do not understand what IC law is really about.

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