Voter ID Works in Mexico … It Could Also Work In LA and the US

In Mexico, illegal aliens are not given free health care, education and a driver’s license. Instead, when found, they are detained, jailed and deported, in a matter of weeks. No chance for them to go back on the streets, no amnesty—deportation. Mexico also, wants honest elections. They demand Voter ID. If it is good enough for Mexico why does the President demand dishonest elections? Simply answer:

Barack Obama is a Chicago Democrat. That explains it all.

“-On any given morning, in just about any Mexican city you can see a Mexican citizen lining up to renew his or her voter credential, a document required at a polling station to vote. But voting is not the main reason they get it. The free photo ID issued by the Federal Electoral Institute has become the accepted way to prove one’s identity — and is a one-card way to open a bank account, board an airplane, buy cigarettes and enter a bar. Voting is always an afterthought to Mexicans; they ask for it everywhere, it’s almost impossible to live without it.”

In the U.S. the ACLU goes crazy when the ID issue is raised. They prefer anybody vote, legal or not, qualified or not.    At some point we need to bring honesty back to voting. Until then many will not vote since they know that illegal aliens have the same right to vote as they do. Go to a polling place on election day in California. If you question the right of an illegal alien to vote, you are in trouble while the illegal alien gets an “I Voted” sticker. Angry yet?

voter ID laws

Voter ID Works in Mexico … It Could Also Work In LA and the US

Written by Fred Mariscal, City Watch, 8/11/15

PERSPECTIVE-On any given morning, in just about any Mexican city you can see a Mexican citizen lining up to renew his or her voter credential, a document required at a polling station to vote. But voting is not the main reason they get it. The free photo ID issued by the Federal Electoral Institute has become the accepted way to prove one’s identity — and is a one-card way to open a bank account, board an airplane, buy cigarettes and enter a bar. Voting is always an afterthought to Mexicans; they ask for it everywhere, it’s almost impossible to live without it.

Here in the United States the left is against voter ID’s. The American Civil Liberties Union says it’s an invasion of privacy. Which is nonsense, it’s like saying that having a driver’s license or a Social Security Card threatens our privacy. Minority advocacy groups have even alleged that the cards would frighten minorities going to the polls.

But Mexico has not seen many problems with its card, and national identity cards have been issued for years in France, Spain, Poland, Belgium, Italy, Switzerland, Singapore, Brazil, and many other countries to prove citizenship. They can be use for many purposes, including travel, banking, and healthcare access as well as voting.

Mexico is a relatively poor country, yet does not lower standards to allow for the poor to register and vote as is done in America. No excuses are made while setting a high standard for all with no discernible drop in voter participation.

So what has happened so far in the more than 20 years that the ID has been in place? In 1994, voter registration was 45 million, which was 50% of the population. In 2009, it rose to 72 million, which is 65% of the population. So, even though the reforms made it more involved to register, registration actually increased.

What about turnout? Did the tough new voter ID laws and lack of voting by mail suppress the vote? The complete opposite has happened.

In the 1988 election, there were 19.6 million votes cast, representing about 25% of the population. In 2006, under the strict new rules, the number of votes cast skyrocketed to 41.7 million, which was almost 40% of the population.

I’m not necessarily advocating for the government to start issuing voter ID’s, however, I think this is a good idea and can be implemented over time so that all citizens eventually can have an ID.

This is not just a matter of voting, but also a matter of national security. Improved identifications were recommended by the 9/11 Commission given that the hijackers had driver’s licenses or state non-driver’s identification cards that they used to rent apartments, open bank accounts and board planes. Social Security numbers are often used as proof of eligibility to work, but undocumented often use stolen numbers. I have to say for the record that I was in favor of the California law granting undocumented workers drivers’ licenses for that is a matter of public safety period.

But Although in Mexico the national photo ID was introduced to stop voter fraud, it has achieved much more, bolstering the credibility of elections and helping the poor.

The IDs resolved a problem for many poor people “who previously had no way of being able to identify themselves,” said Miguel Ángel Carlos, security committee coordinator at the Association of Mexican Banks.

Some U.S. states, including Texas and South Carolina, approved laws requiring voters to show a government photo identification prior to voting. The U.S. Justice Department rejected the law, saying it discriminates against minorities. Really? So we have to accept that minorities can’t get the require documentation? We should figure out a way to help those minorities who can’t verify their identity verify it.

Every citizen in the United States should be able to prove his or her identity if they choose to, being poor or a minority shouldn’t be an obstacle. It should be a basic American right. — This is nonsense!

Let’s be honest about it, the arguments against the ID are just weak excuses, there is nothing to be afraid of. The hurdles can be overcome, and overtime the benefits will outweigh the risks.

This is the United States of America, if Mexico can do it so can we. Rich or poor, minority or majority every American citizen should have access to their identity. Every citizen should have access to a basic government ID and it should be free. It will make our country safer, and things will be easier for everyone.

LATINO PERSPECTIVE-On any given morning, in just about any Mexican city you can see a Mexican citizen lining up to renew his or her voter credential, a document required at a polling station to vote. But voting is not the main reason they get it. The free photo ID issued by the Federal Electoral Institute has become the accepted way to prove one’s identity — and is a one-card way to open a bank account, board an airplane, buy cigarettes and enter a bar. Voting is always an afterthought to Mexicans; they ask for it everywhere, it’s almost impossible to live without it.

Here in the United States the left is against voter ID’s. The American Civil Liberties Union says it’s an invasion of privacy. Which is nonsense, it’s like saying that having a driver’s license or a Social Security Card threatens our privacy. Minority advocacy groups have even alleged that the cards would frighten minorities going to the polls.

But Mexico has not seen many problems with its card, and national identity cards have been issued for years in France, Spain, Poland, Belgium, Italy, Switzerland, Singapore, Brazil, and many other countries to prove citizenship. They can be use for many purposes, including travel, banking, and healthcare access as well as voting.

Mexico is a relatively poor country, yet does not lower standards to allow for the poor to register and vote as is done in America. No excuses are made while setting a high standard for all with no discernible drop in voter participation.

So what has happened so far in the more than 20 years that the ID has been in place? In 1994, voter registration was 45 million, which was 50% of the population. In 2009, it rose to 72 million, which is 65% of the population. So, even though the reforms made it more involved to register, registration actually increased.

What about turnout? Did the tough new voter ID laws and lack of voting by mail suppress the vote? The complete opposite has happened.

In the 1988 election, there were 19.6 million votes cast, representing about 25% of the population. In 2006, under the strict new rules, the number of votes cast skyrocketed to 41.7 million, which was almost 40% of the population.

I’m not necessarily advocating for the government to start issuing voter ID’s, however, I think this is a good idea and can be implemented over time so that all citizens eventually can have an ID.

This is not just a matter of voting, but also a matter of national security. Improved identifications were recommended by the 9/11 Commission given that the hijackers had driver’s licenses or state non-driver’s identification cards that they used to rent apartments, open bank accounts and board planes. Social Security numbers are often used as proof of eligibility to work, but undocumented often use stolen numbers. I have to say for the record that I was in favor of the California law granting undocumented workers drivers’ licenses for that is a matter of public safety period.

But Although in Mexico the national photo ID was introduced to stop voter fraud, it has achieved much more, bolstering the credibility of elections and helping the poor.

The IDs resolved a problem for many poor people “who previously had no way of being able to identify themselves,” said Miguel Ángel Carlos, security committee coordinator at the Association of Mexican Banks.

Some U.S. states, including Texas and South Carolina, approved laws requiring voters to show a government photo identification prior to voting. The U.S. Justice Department rejected the law, saying it discriminates against minorities. Really? So we have to accept that minorities can’t get the require documentation? We should figure out a way to help those minorities who can’t verify their identity verify it.

Every citizen in the United States should be able to prove his or her identity if they choose to, being poor or a minority shouldn’t be an obstacle. It should be a basic American right. — This is nonsense!

Let’s be honest about it, the arguments against the ID are just weak excuses, there is nothing to be afraid of. The hurdles can be overcome, and overtime the benefits will outweigh the risks.

This is the United States of America, if Mexico can do it so can we. Rich or poor, minority or majority every American citizen should have access to their identity. Every citizen should have access to a basic government ID and it should be free. It will make our country safer, and things will be easier for everyone.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.