While unions demand more money, unemployment data shows increasing layoffs in education sector

Distance learning is not working for students—and it looks like it is not working for the teachers or unions.

“Despite the record level of funding, by June, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that 469,000 K-12 personnel, state-run colleges and universities laid off 176,000 professors and other employees. Private schools, including well-known colleges and universities and K-12 private schools, reported 457,000 layoffs.

This is more than the nearly 300,000 education professionals who lost their jobs during the entire period of the 2008 Great Recession, according to an analysis financed by the Russell Sage Foundation.

In total, BLS reported 779,000 layoffs in K-12 public school district personnel nationwide in the months of April and May.

What did you expect?  Close schools, why pay for no work.  No students on campus, no need for “diversity” deans earning $250,000 a year.  Maybe setting up education POD’s, charter schools where teachers want to work, and would help educate our children.  The current system is a failure—anybody disagree?

While unions demand more money, unemployment data shows increasing layoffs in education sector

By Bethany Blankley | The Center Square, 11/13/20 

 (The Center Square) – In April, several education groups, including two national teachers’ unions, urged Congressional leaders to allocate more than $200 billion to education in addition to the CARES Act and federal relief through which Congress had just allocated nearly $31 billion in March.

They requested an additional subsidy of $175 billion for K-12 education at the state level, $13 billion for IDEA and $12 billion for Title I. In March, they had lobbied for $75 billion for additional state aid.

Ultimately, Congress allocated $31 billion funding toward education nationwide. Many higher education institutions were criticized for taking millions of dollars when they were holding hefty endowments, especially after the top 25 universities in the U.S. with $350 billion in total endowments were allocated $800 million in coronavirus aid.

Despite the record level of funding, by June, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) reported that 469,000 K-12 personnel, state-run colleges and universities laid off 176,000 professors and other employees. Private schools, including well-known colleges and universities and K-12 private schools, reported 457,000 layoffs.

This is more than the nearly 300,000 education professionals who lost their jobs during the entire period of the 2008 Great Recession, according to an analysis financed by the Russell Sage Foundation.

In total, BLS reported 779,000 layoffs in K-12 public school district personnel nationwide in the months of April and May.

The AFT reported a list of higher education institutions that eliminated full-time faculty positions, imposed hiring restrictions, and furloughed employees.

“While the pandemic has certainly exacerbated the financial issues facing most colleges and universities, the truth is that, for decades, public financial support for higher education has plummeted,” AFT President Randi Weingarten and Rutgers AAUP-AFT President Todd Wolfson wrote in an op-ed. “Dozens of university leaders have announced drastic budget cuts, furloughs, layoffs and even permanent campus closures, instead of dipping into reserves or reducing salaries of highly paid executives and coaches.”

But before the coronavirus ever hit, according to the California School Boards Association, roughly 7 in 10 school districts in California were already facing budget deficits; 40 percent were already considering or issuing employee layoffs to help offset increasing costs.

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.

Comments

  1. William Hicks says

    IF the layoff’s are anything typical of LAUSD practices, those laidoff are not the teachers refusing to go to work. . It will, or already is, the Custodian that cleans your childs classroom and the Gardener that mows the schools lawns.

  2. Gee, “state-run colleges and universities laid off 176,000 professors and other employees.” Probably more than 90% of the layoffs were leftist leaning professors who are now learning first-hand the realities of the socialist policies they were teaching their students. How sad – but absolutely no sympathy. Karma can be a real bi**ch.

  3. The sooner we make the education money follow the student the sooner we will return to a quality education system. With the money now having to pass through the unions, the state government and other special interests we will never regain the quality we use to have many years ago. Competition really brings about change. Performance by the students is the real measure of student success.

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