Worst Bill of New Year—SB 450—Mandates ALL Registered Voters be MAILED a Ballot—Fraud to be Rampant

If SB 450 passes there will be no absentee ballots—at all. No requests for absentee ballots, no need to file as a permanent absentee. Under this bill the Registrar of Voters of your county will be mandated to send a ballot to your home—even if you do not want it, do not intend to vote or died a few years ago but still on the roles.

Should the bill pass watch the thefts from mailboxes skyrocket? Thieves working with campaigns will be able to steal ballots. For instance what stops Democrats (I know they would NEVER do this) from stealing ballots from the mail boxes of elderly Republicans, mostly unable to go through the bureaucracy to get a new ballot? Or a rent control measure is on the ballot and those opposed to it steal the ballots from renter’s mailboxes—who would know how to get a new ballot?

If I wanted to corrupt the system, make people feel voting no longer matters, this is parrt of my plan. “The senate is set to consider one reform—SB 450—that would require county election officials to mail ballots to every registered voter. Voters could return the ballots by mail or drop them off at vote centers that would be open during regular business hours for 28 days before elections. The PPIC Statewide Survey looked at the impact this reform might have on voter turnout.”

Voted

Would Making Voting Easier Increase Turnout?

Dean Bonner, PPIC, 12/17/15

In the wake of record-low turnout in both the primary and general elections in 2014, efforts to improve voter participation are under way. The senate is set to consider one reform—SB 450—that would require county election officials to mail ballots to every registered voter. Voters could return the ballots by mail or drop them off at vote centers that would be open during regular business hours for 28 days before elections. The PPIC Statewide Survey looked at the impact this reform might have on voter turnout.

We asked registered voters who do not always vote how likely they would be to do so in this scenario. Two in three (66%) said they would be very likely to vote. Strong majorities across parties concurred (72% Democrats, 67% independents, 65% Republicans), as did majorities across age, income, and education groups.

But this view is less frequently expressed among groups who are historically less likely to vote: Latinos (60%), voters age 18 to 34 (62%), those with only a high school diploma (59%), and those with household incomes under $40,000 (59%).

Attitudes about government matter as well. Those who say they have a great deal or a fair amount of interest in politics are much more likely than those with little or no interest to say they are very likely to vote (73% to 57%). And 69 percent of those who agree with the statement that voting gives “people like me some say in what government does” said they are very likely to vote. Among those who disagree with that statement, 60 percent said they are very likely to vote.

Overall, nearly half of registered voters who report that they vote part of the time, seldom, or never say this reform would make them very likely to vote (48% compared to 77% of frequent voters). These findings suggest that while this reform may not be a cure all, it could encourage Californians who say they don’t always vote to cast ballots more often.

 

About Stephen Frank

Stephen Frank is the publisher and editor of California Political News and Views. He speaks all over California and appears as a guest on several radio shows each week. He has also served as a guest host on radio talk shows. He is a fulltime political consultant.