California Presidential Vote Shows Huge Disconnect With Nation

CA Secretary of State Alex Padilla has certified the final Presidential vote in California and Hillary Clinton swamped Donald Trump here with close to 62% of the vote and nearly a 4 1/2 million vote victory margin.  While President-elect Trump won 30 states and a landslide in the electoral college, Clinton ended the campaign with a lead of 2,833,000 votes nationally.  Yet if California is backed out of the national popular vote totals, Trump would have a substantial 1,677,000 vote lead nationally.

Thus, the CA vote proves just how “out of touch” California voters are with the rest of the nation.  Hillary won 48.3% of the vote nationally only if you factor in the extraordinarily good showing in CA.  In fact, Hillary’s CA results stand in stark contrast to the predictions prior to the election: while few polls showed Trump winning in the important swing states of Florida, Michigan, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania and Ohio, and he ended up winning them all, the last poll in California before the election pegged Hillary at 53% – far below her actual victory margin here.  In fact, Hillary, almost inexplicably, won about 900,000 more votes than Barack Obama did in 2012, and finished with an even higher percentage of the vote than Obama in that election.

California Democrats increased their representations in the State Legislature and came close to knocking off an additional Republican Congressman or two.  They are firmly in control in California, and going forward, when they brag about California being the 6th largest economy in the world, it will be impossible for them to blame California’s 24% poverty rate based on cost of living on Republicans.  If California is indeed the 6th biggest economy in the world, then this means it also has the highest poverty rate of the top six in the world, and that is nothing to brag about, Democrat friends!

California however is not exactly an unimportant state in Presidential politics.  Up to the point of the Indiana GOP primary election on May 3, just about a month before the California primary, it was apparent that Trump and Ted Cruz would be headed for a bruising finale in the Golden State, and because of a terrific campaign in which CA consultant Tim Clark played a key role, Trump was ahead in the polls and looking to our state as a “firewall” to win the nomination.  But when Cruz was knocked off by Donald Trump in Indiana, he soon dropped out of the race and Trump “cruised” to a big win with over 75% of the GOP vote.  California, with its largest delegation to the Republican National Convention, will indeed continue to play an important role in support of Donald Trump’s re-election in 2020.

Donald Trump