In 2016 John Cox and George Soros Teamed Up

John CoxBefore running for California governor, John Cox was best known for two things, his many failed attempts at running for political office in his home state of Illinois and his plan to increase the number of legislators in California from 120 to over 12,000. A few years ago, when he showed up in California and got involved in politics, most just wrote him off as an eccentric older millionaire with too much time on his hands, but conservative and probably harmless.

Thus, it surprised even this author that as recently as last year, John Cox donated $5,000 to Mayday PAC through Change California Inc., an organization he chairs and controls. On the surface, Mayday PAC claims to be nonpartisan and has a simple goal: get the influence of money out of politics. Anything noble or truthful about the Mayday PAC starts and ends with its mission statement.

One can probably guess there is something rotten at Mayday when an organization with the stated goal of getting money out of politics raises millions of dollars. It quickly spirals out of control from there.

First, a quick look at Mayday’s spending reveals that there is nothing non partisan about them. Mayday is a Democrat super PAC and spends a vast majority of its money supporting Democrats and attacking Republicans. For example, in 2014, Mayday spent $1.4 million supporting Democrats and $4.2 million attacking Republicans. Mayday also spent $1.6 million meddling in Republican primaries, a vast majority supporting Scott Brown’s primary opponent in New Hampshire. Weakening Scott Brown in a tough general election race against an incumbent Democrat Senator.

In 2016, the year John Cox donated $5,000, Mayday spent only $2,250 supporting a Republican. So what was the rest of Cox’s money used to support?

Mayday’s solution to money in politics is just changing where the money comes from. Instead of private donors, Mayday would like taxpayers to fund political campaigns. As it turns out, public financing of political campaigns also happens to be a priority for the George Soros’ Open Society Foundation.

This could be chalked up to coincidence, until you look at Lawrence Lessig, the creator of the Mayday PAC. Lessig is a Harvard professor with a long history of liberal political activism. He is also happens to be affiliated with multiple George Soros backed organizations. For example, he is on the board of MapLight and on the advisory board for the Sunlight Foundation, both George Soros affiliated organizations.

So why did John Cox give money to a leftist George Soros crony? Was he duped or is the eccentric millionaire more sinister than he appears?

Travis Allen surges to top Republican, #3 overall in Governor’s race!

Travis-Allen-Associated-PressDespite Republican opponent John Cox’s spending over $3 million already in his race for Governor, conservative Assemblyman Travis Allen (R – Huntington Beach) has surged past Cox in a USC statewide poll released today, and is now in the #3 spot over-all in the 2018 race for California Governor, and is the top Republican contender. Allen gained the support of 15% of voters who plan to cast ballots in the primary.  Cox received the support just 11% — and is now in a more distant #5 spot in the race to beat Gavin Newsom.  In the last series of polls, Allen has been consistently gaining percentage support, while Cox has consistently declined, despite spending much more than Allen on consultants and social media advertising for his campaign.  Cox has had trouble convincing Republican volunteer group members to support him in recent weeks, as it was revealed that he did not support the Republican party nominee for President – Donald Trump, in the last election, and instead says he voted for the Libertarian Party nominee, Gary Johnson.

Here are the poll results:

Gavin Newsom (D): 31%

Antonio Villaraigosa (D): 21%

Travis Allen (R): 15%

John Chiang (D): 12%

John Cox (R): 11%

To read the Los Angeles Times story on the USC poll, click here: http://beta.latimes.com/politics/la-pol-ca-latimes-senate-governor-primary-poll-20171109-story.html

 

GOP ramps up effort to repeal California gas tax increase

As reported by CBS8.com:

Republicans’ latest effort to repeal California’s upcoming gas tax increase got a boost Wednesday from members of Congress and GOP gubernatorial candidate John Cox, who said he would spend “significant” money to help put the initiative on next year’s ballot.

“We can’t keep making this state unaffordable for working people and expect people to stay,” Cox said at a news conference at the California Republican Party’s headquarters.

It’s the second Republican initiative aimed at repealing the tax increase, passed by lawmakers this year to generate $52 billion over 10 years for road and bridge repairs. The gas tax will go up by 12 cents per gallon in November, and diesel taxes will spike as well. The other repeal effort is backed by Assemblyman Travis Allen — Cox’s competitor for the Republican gubernatorial nomination. Both initiatives aim to repeal the tax increase, but the Cox-backed effort will also include a constitutional amendment that requires any future gas and car tax increases to win voter approval.

Republicans view the tax increase as a highly unpopular move that will draw voters from across California to the polls in the midterm election. Democrats plan to aggressively target seven California Republicans who serve in districts that voted Democratic in the presidential election. …

Click here to read the full article

John Cox is a Chad Mayes Republican

When voting for cap and trade, Chad Mayes attempted to tell Republicans that he is supporting conservative principles, a policy “Ronald Reagan would vote for.” In reality, he voted for a massive gas tax on middle-class California families. The cap and trade vote exposed Chad Mayes as an ideologically corrupt politician who cloaked himself with conservative talking points while kissing up to a morally bankrupt majority and special interests in Sacramento.

John CoxA close inspection of John Cox’s record shows that he is Chad Mayes’ soul mate. His conservatism is a facade, used only to gain votes for his own aggrandisement.

Similar to Chad Mayes, Cox is a devoted Never Trumper. They both proudly admit they voted against our party nominee for president. Even worse, John Cox didn’t even vote for a Republican, instead he supported crazy Gary Johnson. What every Republican knows is that a vote for Gary Johnson was, essentially, a vote for Hillary Clinton. There was zero chance Gary Johnson would win and voting for Johnson instead of Donald Trump put Hillary one vote closer to the White House.

As a candidate for president, John Cox ran on platform opposing the death penalty; a position that makes sense for a Gary Johnson supporter. However, this position does not fit with our conservative pro law and order values. California voters, which aren’t exactly known for rejecting crazy liberal ideas, even rejected this position in the last election. Instead, California voters passed an initiative to reform and speed up the death penalty process.

During his long tenure in Chicago politics, John Cox did not try to hide behind a conservative veneer.  He was openly a Chad Mayes Republican. He has openly bragged about hosting a progressive Republican radio show. Now, he claims to be just a conservative. California politics might be nuts, but not even here are Chicago progressives considered conservative. I doubt even Chad Mayes would try to get away with this outlandish claim.

John Cox would like to bring Chicago-style politics to the entire state. He wants conservatives to believe that his neighborhood legislature initiative would be a revolutionary change that would take corruption out of politics. In reality, there is nothing new or great about his proposal. It is really just a copy of the politics John Cox observed during the time he spent in Chicago.

The city of Chicago is broken up into a neighborhood legislature – they are called city wards. Chicago has 50 wards and each is represented by an Alderman. The Chicago system is riddled with corruption and has brought nothing but poverty, crime and destruction to the city. Chad Mayes Republican John Cox is now trying to sell this system to California as a way to rid California of special interests and root out corruption. I am surprised he has not yet told us that this is a system that Ronald Reagan would vote for.

California Republicans fought against Chad Mayes and the corrupt power structure that supported him.  We cannot now be fooled by a creature of an even worse political swamp, Chicago. John Cox is not a conservative and he is not a Republican. We need to drain the California political swamp and reject John Cox.

Nutty John Cox for California Governor?

John CoxJohn Cox was hardly a serious candidate for governor of California when the first UC Berkeley/IGS poll was announced earlier this year in March and gave him, the only Republican listed in the poll, 18 percent of the vote and the prized second spot against Gavin Newsom, suggesting to amateur political observers that he might have a chance to get into a November 2018 Republican vs. Democrat run-off with Newsom, offering the California GOP its first long-shot chance at statewide office in years. The ensuing press reports took Cox seriously. But none of the reporters did much homework on Cox, labeling him positively as a political newcomer or outsider. They all failed to mention he had been on the ballot before in California, with an awful showing. The reporters could have recalled for readers that Cox was surely not a fresh face to our statewide ballot, and that the last time he was on it, he ran for the Republican nomination for president in the February, 2008 primary, and proved a miserable votegetter, barely mustering 3,200 votes statewide, finishing with .01 percent, while both John McCain and Mitt Romney drew over a million votes each.

Cox, a native of Illinois, is a candidate for governor who must NOT be taken seriously. He is a serial candidate, and what older Republican operatives might label a “Harold Stassen.” Stassen once served as governor of Minnesota and was termed a “boy wonder,” but was bit so hard by the political bug that he ran for the GOP nomination for president, unsuccessfully, 9 times in a row, losing every time. Yet Cox differs from Stassen in that Cox has never won any elective office, and he has run plenty of times. He has actually hit a trifecta of losses having run for every federal office one can, losing each time. Cox has run for Cook County Clerk, Congress, and U.S. Senate, all in Illinois, losing all the races, all losses by wide margins.

But in 2008, despite all his previous electoral defeats, Cox decided to run for president as well. He says he contributed $1 million to his campaign, visited all 99 counties in Iowa, campaigned hard in New Hampshire with 14 visits, visited South Carolina 10 times to campaign, and appeared on the ballot in California. During his campaign, he got into an altercation with security at the Reagan Library in Simi Valley because his campaign performance had proven so insignificant that they would not let him in to the presidential debate. Even though he was excluded, he still tried to use a questionable media credential to enter the premises under the ruse he was a fake press operative. His vote-getting prowess was a disaster – he received not one delegate to the Republican National Convention. In major counties in California that will be very important to the governor’s race, like Fresno, for example, he got just 60 votes across the county’s three congressional districts, according to the California Secretary of State’s office.

By June 2017, Cox quickly fell in the gubernatorial race polls, losing 50 percent of his initial support, in the second UC Berkeley/IGS  poll when just one other Republican was added to the mix by the poll authors – this time former Assemblyman David Hadley, who was not an announced candidate for governor at the time he was added to the poll and who has since stated he is not running for the office. The significance of the second poll, with Cox running hard for several months yet dropping from 18 percent to 9 percent as an announced candidate, and Hadley at 7 percent as an unannounced candidate with no campaign, established that Republicans had hardly raised a groundswell of support for Cox in the first poll, rather, Cox made a showing in the first poll in March because he was the only candidate on the poll Republicans had to chose from. As soon as another Republican was put on the list to chose from in the second poll, even someone not running for the office at the time, Cox’s support quickly and very significantly tanked.

Cox’s lack of real support was evidenced again in a poll in Silicon Valley in May where, once again, when listed as the only Republican on the ballot he received 16 percent of the vote, however, when the poll considered “favorability,” Cox garnered a terrible 3 percent, the lowest favorability rate of all the candidates.

When asked, Cox would not tell the San Francisco Chronicle whether or not he voted for Donald Trump for president. While Cox’s strategy may be to separate himself from Trump, who surely is not as popular in California as Gavin Newsom, Cox will not be endearing himself with the thousands of members of Republican volunteer organizations in the state who care about their party’s candidates. Members of the California Republican Woman’s Federated Clubs, for example, who form many local clubs that are the backbone of the state GOP’s grass-roots operations, may or may not have supported Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential race, but they surely all overwhelmingly voted for him as the Republican Party’s candidate for president, even if some of them had to “hold their noses” out of party loyalty. These voters will not be impressed with Cox’s lack of candor about his own presidential vote, which will stink to them of party disloyalty.

The issues Californians and Republicans care about in opinion polls, like being taxed too much, do not appear on Cox’s radar screen. Cox’s central campaign theme is his “Neighborhood Legislature” idea, to expand the California Senate and Assembly to 12,000 members. It is truly a nutty idea that has no support in opinion polls. While the state Legislature truly is in need of reform, like making itself a part-time body, world history tells us increasing its size to that of a small coastal city is not going to improve policy. There were also thousands of members of the Soviet Union’s legislative body, far too many, intentionally, to actually make decisions, and the result was the concentration of power in a small committee known as the Politburo, which established a “dictatorship of the proletariat.” We are close enough as it is today with near dictatorship of Democratic control in Sacramento, to just add thousands more people to the legislative ranks.

What California needs is some political balance, and if the Republican Party can settle on a single, strong candidate to run for governor in a field of many Democrats, there is indeed a long-shot chance a united GOP could get their candidate into a run-off with a Democrat and then see what happens. The fact is Maryland, Massachusetts and Illinois, all deeply “blue” Democratic states, currently have Republican governors, elected to balance Democratic control in the state. It would be a tough order for the GOP to fulfill, but not impossible, as long as Republicans end up with a candidate with a much better vote-getting history, and who runs on issues voters actually care about, than nutty John Cox.

 

California Republicans sweat Trump effect

Travis-Allen-Associated-PressSAN FRANCISCO — Republicans running for governor in the Democratic stronghold of California face a myriad of challenges. One of the them is how to handle the issue of Donald Trump.

Travis Allen, an assemblyman who announced his bid last week to succeed Jerry Brown as the state’s next governor, argues that he’s already a standout — of the three leading Republicans in the race, he alone proudly admits voting for the president.

“There were 4.4 million Republicans in California who voted for Trump, and they are looking for real leadership in California,” Allen told POLITICO last week as he tooled around the state’s highways on a campaign trip.

He said the reluctance of the leading GOP challengers — millionaire businessman John Cox and former Assemblyman David Hadley — to embrace Trump and his positions “may not sit very well with Republicans who are voting come June 2018.”

Yet at the same time, the deep animus toward Trump in California makes embracing him a difficult proposition for any candidate who hopes to win a general election. Together, it’s presenting a thorny situation for GOP candidates as the state’s marquee 2018 race ramps up.

In an overwhelmingly blue state — where Democrats hold a 19-point voter registration edge over Republicans — leading Democratic contenders like Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, former Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, state Treasurer John Chiang and former state Superintendent of Schools Delaine Eastin are busy collecting donors’ checks and are widely covered by major media outlets.

By contrast, the GOP candidates in California are relative unknowns who, on top of a party registration gap, face the hurdles of the state’s “top two” primary system — which calls for the top two vote-getters of either party to advance to the general election. In a crowded gubernatorial field, that drastically decreases their chances of making it to the general election.

And this year, the Republican candidates have the added “Trump factor” to contend with.

Thanks to Trump — whose approval rating in California is just 27 percent and who lost the popular vote by 4 million votes here — getting to the governorship is “almost an insurmountable mountain for Republicans to climb,’’ said USC political analyst Sherry Bebitch Jeffe.

The delicate formula for victory involves backing Trump enough to please the party’s base — volunteers and donors who are critical to success — while not alienating the independents, 1 in 4 state voters who could make the winning difference in the general election.

Jim Lacy, a Trump delegate to the Republican National Convention and author of “Taxifornia: Liberals’ Laboratory to Bankrupt California,” frankly acknowledges that “if a Republican candidate went out and fully embraced Trump, and shouted through the state that they’re Trump’s candidate for governor,” it would almost certainly end their chances to make it to the state’s general election.

But he says there’s a way to thread the needle — though to have any chance of victory, a California Republican must have the backing of the loyal GOP grass-roots activists and donors who can make or break a campaign here.

“Even though many of them didn’t like Trump, they voted for him because they are tried-and-true Republicans,’’ Lacy said. Allen alone “can very proudly say he voted for the GOP candidate — and that these other folks who say they are Republican haven’t done so.”

Hadley — a moderate who has in the past won the backing of millionaire donor Charles Munger Jr. — told the Los Angeles Times recently that he didn’t vote for Trump in the 2016 election. The former assemblyman said he hopes to appeal to voters who may be willing to cross party lines and that he will soon announce endorsements from more than 20 GOP members of the legislature.

Cox, in a past interview with POLITICO, declined to say for whom he cast his vote, though he said last week that he is glad Hillary Clinton didn’t win, because she “would have been a disaster.”

But Cox, who ran for both U.S. Senate and president in Illinois before he moved to California — and has never been elected to office — has wholly embraced the Trumpian notion that an outsider can offer fresh solutions and break up the stale government insiders’ hold on Sacramento. “I’m a businessman, not a politician,’’ he said, a line that comes directly from Trump’s playbook. “I’m running to clean out the barn.”

Yet he’s also carefully attempted to distance himself from some of the president’s more controversial moves — his tweets, for example. “Take a look at my Twitter feed,’’ he said, when asked about Trump’s critiques of the media, TV personalities and the intelligence community. “My tweets are positive … that’s the tenor of what you’ll see coming out of me. … I’m not going to comment on the president.”

All three GOP candidates accuse Democrats — who hold supermajorities in both houses of the California legislature — of overreaching, and Brown of failing to keep them in check. Despite the open hostility of many California political leaders to Trump, Allen argues Democrats and independents are not all in lockstep with the “State of Resistance” agenda on issues like sanctuary cities.

“A friendly relationship with the White House could only benefit California’’ in areas like infrastructure, jobs and federal funding, Allen said.

“It’s up to the government in California to take care of our state first and foremost,’’ he said. “And this is what has been completely lacking with the Democrat leadership in Sacramento — from Jerry Brown to [Senate President] Kevin de Leon to [Attorney General] Xavier Becerra. They have taken an antagonistic stance, regardless of the detrimental effect to the state, and it’s gotta change.”

Allen cites Brown’s recent support for an increase in the state gas tax, which he argues is unpopular and won’t solve the state’s traffic gridlock problems. He also points to sanctuary cities — a concept that polls show is not nearly as popular as Democrats suggest, he argues.

“There is a widely held misconception that the Democrats are invincible in California,’’ he said “But there is a silent supermajority that has been marginalized and forgotten by Jerry Brown and the ruling Democrats. These are the people who are screaming at their TVs every night and can’t understand why their politicians aren’t listening to them.’’

Allen said he’s already lined up party-slate mailers that will reach 14 million of those voters by the fall — an advantage he argues will give him a major advantage over his fellow Republicans in a state with eight major media markets where TV spots are among the most expensive in the country.

But even that may not be enough. On the fundraising front, Democrats have raised more than $20 million to date — and front-runner Newsom alone has banked more than $10 million. By contrast, GOP front-runner Cox, who says he’s putting $3 million of his own money in the race, last week announced he has raised $202,000 — the most to date in the Republican field.

Hoover Institution fellow Bill Whalen, who was an adviser to former GOP Gov. Pete Wilson, says popular San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer dashed the Republican Party’s hopes recently by insisting again that he won’t enter the race, so “there is not an alpha in the field.” As a result, Republican candidates will get even less attention.

Which means “until any of these candidates show serious money or the ability to raise their name recognition, let’s forget about Donald Trump,” Whalen said. “He’s the least of their problems.”

This article was originally published by Politico.com

Republican joins 2018 race for California governor

As reported by the Fresno Bee:

Assemblyman Travis Allen is the sixth candidate — and second Republican — to jump into California’s 2018 gubernatorial contest.

The candidates hoping to replace Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown are:

—Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat. Newsom announced his bid to succeed Brown early, in 2015. He was elected lieutenant governor in 2010 after serving as San Francisco’s mayor.

—Antonio Villaraigosa, a Democrat. Villaraigosa is a former mayor of Los Angeles, the first Latino to hold the post in more than a century.

—State Treasurer John Chiang, a Democrat. Chiang serves as the state treasurer and would be California’s first Asian-American governor.

—Delaine Eastin, a Democrat. Eastin is the former state superintendent of public instruction, leading California’s public school system from 1995 to 2003.

—John Cox, a Republican. Cox is a San Diego-based businessman with experience in real estate management and investment firms. He’s already dumped $3 million of his own money into the race. He previously made an unsuccessful run for Congress in Illinois.

—Travis Allen, a Republican. Allen is a three-term assemblyman from Huntington Beach. He’s heading a ballot initiative to repeal a gas tax increase passed by mostly Democratic lawmakers earlier this year.