California?s right-to-die law upheld by state appeals court

assisted suicideA state appeals court rejected a challenge Tuesday to California?s right-to-die law for terminally ill patients, overturning a judge?s ruling in May that had briefly blocked enforcement of the law.

The statute, in effect since June 2016, allows a dying adult patient to take lethal drugs that a doctor has prescribed. Before that, two doctors must have determined that the patient would die within six months and was mentally competent to choose death.

Riverside County Superior Court Judge Daniel Ottolia halted enforcement of the law in May,?ruling that state lawmakers had illegally considered and passed?the legislation during a special session devoted to health care. Allowing patients to take their own lives has no apparent connection to improving Californians? health care, Ottolia said.

Bills passed in a special session require the same majority vote as in normal legislative sessions, but are generally reviewed more quickly and take effect sooner than in regular sessions. However, the right-to-die bill, which Gov. Jerry Brown signed in October 2015, was drafted to take effect eight months later. …

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Court reinstates California law allowing terminally ill people to end their lives

assisted suicideA state appeals court has reinstated?? at least for now?? California’s law allowing terminally ill people to end their lives. The Fourth District Court of Appeals in Riverside issued an immediate stay Friday putting the End of Life Option back into effect. The court also gave opponents of its decision until July 2 to file objections.

The law allows adults to obtain a prescription for life-ending drugs if a doctor has determined that they have six months or less to live.

Riverside County Superior Court Judge Daniel Ottolia declared the law unconstitutional last month, stating that it had been adopted illegally because lawmakers passed it during a special Legislative session called to address other matters. Ottolia didn’t address the issue of whether it’s proper for people to end their lives.

Right-to-die advocates hailed Friday’s action.

“This stay is a huge win for many terminally ill Californians with six months or less to live because it could take years for the courts to resolve this case,” Kevin D?az, national director of legal advocacy for Compassion & Choices, said in a statement.

“Thankfully, this ruling settles the issue for the time being, but we know we have a long fight ahead before we prevail.”

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, who had asked the appeals court to stay Ottolia’s ruling, also praised the decision. …

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Terminally ill in California waiting to die, but this court won’t let them

assisted suicideDozens of terminally ill patients in California who counted on using the state?s medical aid-in-dying law may be in limbo for a month after a court ruling that suspended the 2016 measure.

A judge who ruled in May that the law was improperly enacted refused to vacate that decision at the request of advocates last week. Riverside County Superior Court Judge Daniel Ottolia set a hearing for June 29, however, to consider a separate motion by state Attorney General Xavier Becerra to reverse the decision.

Opponents cheered what they hope will be the end of a law they?ve fought from the day it was passed. Compassion & Choices, an advocacy group that promotes aid-in-dying,?filed a notice to appealal?late Friday and asked Becerra to uphold the group?s legal opinion that their appeal would trigger a stay of Ottolia?s judgment. Such a stay would reinstate the law pending further court action. Becerra did not immediately respond to the group, or to requests for comment.

For an estimated 200 patients who had already started the process of hastening their deaths, the decision has sparked confusion and fear, said Kat West, Compassion & Choices? national policy director. …

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Why conservatives should favor assisted suicide

assisted suicideGov. Jerry Brown recently signed the “assisted suicide” law, which came with significant criticism from those on the right. Many say life is sacred, from conception to natural death. What do these conservatives fail to realize? They should be in favor of this legislation.
As conservatives, we’re always talking about how the government needs to step out of our lives. This a prime example of when government intervention is unacceptable. If an adult wishes to end his or her life, they should have the ability to do so. It’s their life and therefore their decision. Isn’t is better for them to consult their family and physician before making that decision?
Because my mom is a chemotherapy nurse, I’ve seen her patients who are struggling to fight cancer. I’ve heard their stories and watched some of them struggle with such a difficult battle. There are a handful of them who get tired of fighting for their lives. They’re constantly in pain and can’t do what they love because they’re going through chemotherapy and radiation. When they’re not undergoing treatment, they’re feeling sick. It’s a continuous, never ending cycle.
Who are we – the healthy – to tell these people that they should continue being miserable because it’s not the end of their natural life?
If a family member were wanting to end their life, I would rather have them go to the doctor and end their life that way. That would prepare me for the real likelihood of losing them. I would rather know beforehand than to find them dead because they overdosed on pain killers or shot themselves in the head.
“Suicide goes against everything God teaches us.”
While this maybe true, remember, every person’s afterlife is determined by God, not us. What happens between a person and God is between them and no one else.

Gov. Brown signs hard-won right-to-die legislation

As reported by the Ventura County Star:

SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) ? California will become the fifth state in the nation to allow terminally ill patients to legally end their lives using doctor-prescribed drugs after Gov. Jerry Brown announced Monday he signed one of the most emotionally charged bills of the year.

Brown, a lifelong Catholic and former Jesuit seminarian, announced that he signed the legislation approved by state lawmakers after an emotional and deeply personal debate. Until now, he had refused to comment on the issue.

The bill passed Sept. 11 after a previous version failed this year despite the highly publicized case of 29-year-old Brittany Maynard, a California woman with brain cancer moved to Oregon to end her life.

Opponents said the bill legalizes premature suicide, but …

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Lawmakers to revive California right-to-die bill

As reported by the San Jose Mercury News:

SACRAMENTO — Democratic lawmakers on Tuesday will unveil plans to revive legislation that would give terminally ill Californians the right to die on their own terms.

Authors of the controversial “End of Life Option Act” shelved the measure last month when it became clear the bill didn’t have enough support to clear a key Assembly committee by a mid-July deadline. It was unclear Monday how the measure will advance now.

Senate Bill 128 would allow mentally competent, terminally ill patients to obtain a legal dose of medication from a physician to ease their suffering by ending their lives. It was inspired by Brittany Maynard, a UC Berkeley graduate who moved to Oregon to legally end her battle with aggressive terminal brain cancer. …

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