School Walkout: ‘Government Is Not A Co-Parent’ Rally At State Capitol Monday

‘Bow to the state or they will take everything from you’

The “Government Is Not A Co-Parent” rally At California’s State Capitol Monday was vast. The “Statewide School Walkout” rally was exactly what it professed it would be: moms, dads, children, grandparents, teachers, and concerned citizens, showed up en masse at the Capitol armed with homemade signs to protest public schools and teachers unions, which pushed to keep schools closed, forced kids into distance learning, and wearing masks all day, and now Gov. Newsom’s mandatory vaccine for children.

“Medical freedom” was/is at the root of the rally. The Globe spoke with parents whose children are otherwise fully vaccinated, but say Gov. Gavin Newsom’s COVID vaccine mandate is unconstitutional and a violation of their medical freedoms.

Speaking at Monday’s rally was Matthew Oliver, owner of House of Oliver wine lounge & restaurant in Roseville, CA. Oliver, a father of five, has protested the business and school lockdowns since the beginning in March 2020. “Welcome to the parent revolution,” Oliver said to loud cheers from the crowd.

“They tried to silence us, and tell us we didn’t matter,” Oliver said. “They tell us our voice doesn’t have power, but it does. Our governor and Legislature need to hear our voice.”

Oliver told the crowd that “now is the time to stand,” otherwise “silence is an endorsement.”

Ponderosa High School teacher Michael Wilkes was put on administrative paid leave after teaching classes while not wearing a mask. Wilkes, a father of three children, has achieved national attention for his stand.

Wilkes said it is important to stand up for individual freedoms and our love of liberty. “They are attempting to divide us over our own children – the tyranny of the powerful over the powerless – bow to the state or they will take everything from you.”

In a recent interview with WCSI, he said he encourages debate in his classes. “He said parents are growing tired of these mandates and pointed to last week’s protest in Sacramento as evidence,” WCSI reported. “The (October 26) protest included parents who lashed out against the Newsom vaccine mandate.”

Wilkes said the district is conducting an investigation and he may lose his job.

At the heart of the protest was Ponderosa high schooler Lexi, who said this all started one day she lowered her mask down below her chin, as many other students had. That went without incident, so she stopped wearing it altogether, and came to school without a mask for one entire week before one of her teachers sent her to the school administrators. Lexi said she walked into the office and none of the administrators were wearing masks. She called them on it, but they told her they only have to wear masks when students are present.

She was given few choices other than to comply with the mask mandate or she could be transferred to online learning. “My education should matter more than a mask,” Lexi said. The administrator told her he agreed, but said he couldn’t do anything without losing his job. Lexi told him to stand up for himself and the students, but fear of losing his job was too great. “It’s okay, I’ll stand up for you too,” Lexi told the administrator at her school. She left Ponderosa High School.

Click here to read full article at the California Globe

Thousands of LA City Workers Protest Vaccine Mandates At City Hall

Firings of 25% of unvaccinated workers next month would ‘cripple’ city

Thousands of city workers and those opposed to the Los Angeles City employee vaccine mandate protested outside of  Los Angeles City Hall Monday, hoping to turn around the law before the extended December deadline.

The city worker mandate, similar to the LA County worker mandate, was passed in August with an October deadline, making vaccinations mandatory for all city employees unless they have medical or religious exemptions. Due to a lack of “vaccination progress,” the deadline was extended to December 18th last month in the hopes that more will vaccinate in time.

Proponents have said that the mandates are in place to help combat COVID-19 spread and surges due to mutation. Prominent lawmakers have said that the mandates are for health and wellness, and that, despite only about 75% of city departments being vaccinated, all unvaccinated city employees will be fired by December if they remain unvaccinated.

“The City’s employee vaccine mandate is critical to protecting the health and safety of our workforce and the Angelenos we serve,” Mayor Eric Garcetti said last month. “Employees must be vaccinated by December 18, and we are putting a rigorous testing program into place in the meantime. Let me be clear: any employee who refuses to be vaccinated by this date should be prepared to lose their job.”

However, opponents, led by the Firefighters 4 Freedom and other city worker opposition groups, have refused vaccines due to bodily autonomy, personal freedom, constitutional, and health concerns. That opposition, as well as a fast-approaching deadline, led to the rally in Los Angeles on Monday.

Service delays, 25% layoffs

Many LAPD, LAFD, and other city workers protested the mandate and warned that service delays and response times would be crippled if each department had to lay off around 25% of their staff each.

“We’re not all these anti-vax people,” said one LAPD officer who attended the rally on Monday, and asked to remain anonymous. “We just don’t want to be forced into getting something we don’t want that infringes on our rights.”

“And, believe it or not, we also get that, yes, vaccinations can build up immunities and all that. But there is a difference between asking and demanding, and they’re saying we can’t go to public places or be employees based on a personal choice. It’s sickening.”

“They fire me, well, there’s thousands more gone too. Fire, emergencies, police; 911 will have to go to voicemail on busy days.”

“We actually have some buddies who were on the Detroit PD and Flint PD when they had to have similar cuts during the recession, and it was not pretty. Crime shot up, out of control blazes shot up. Everything. So there is precedent for what will likely happen. And right now we’re playing chicken with the politicians. They’re trying to get us vaccinated against our will and we’re standing here ready to go whichever way they decide. And right now, they may stop it. They already delayed it once, which gave a lot of us hope. If they were serious, they wouldn’t have given extensions. They flinched, and a lot of us believe that they will flinch again.”

At the protest, the founder of the LAPD anti-mandate group Roll Call 4 Freedom, Michael McMahon, said that many had already left their positions – including himself.

“I turned in my badge and my gun on Friday,” said McMahon. “It was one of the hardest days of my life. “I could not acquiesce in good conscience to submit my health to a still-experimental injection. Thousands of city employees are struggling with these issues related to their employment, and I want to say to you all, from the bottom of my heart, I love you and I understand. But coercion is not informed consent.”

After his speech, cheers and cries of “We will not comply!” resounded outside the City Hall.

City officials have given no indication that they will rescind the mandate as of Monday. The deadline date for all LA city workers to get the vaccination before termination is December 18th.

This article was originally published by the California Globe

Here Are the Arguments That Persuaded the 5th Circuit To Block OSHA’s Vaccine Mandate for Private Employers

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 5th Circuit yesterday stayed the Biden administration’s brand-new COVID-19 vaccine mandate for private employers, which took effect on Friday, when it was published in the Federal Register. The appeals court said the arguments made by the petitioners—a Louisiana supermarket chain and six employees of a Texas company that makes kitchen ventilation systems—”give cause to believe there are grave statutory and constitutional issues with the Mandate.”

The vaccine rule, which was announced in early September but was not unveiled until last Thursday, gives businesses with 100 or more employees two options: They can adopt a “mandatory vaccination policy” with limited exceptions, or they can require unvaccinated employees to wear face masks and undergo weekly COVID-19 testing. The White House described the mandate as part of a broader effort to boost the nationwide vaccination rate. The aim, it said, is to “reduce the number of unvaccinated Americans by using regulatory powers and other actions to substantially increase the number of Americans covered by vaccination requirements.”

But the federal government has no general authority to protect public health, control communicable diseases, or require vaccination, all of which are primarily state responsibilities. The administration therefore presented the vaccine mandate as an “emergency temporary standard” (ETS) issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), which is charged specifically with protecting employees from workplace hazards. As the 5th Circuit indicated, that legal strategy leaves the mandate open to challenge on both statutory and constitutional grounds.

The plaintiffs in BST Holdings v. OSHA, who are represented by the Chicago-based Liberty Justice Center and Louisiana’s Pelican Institute for Public Policy, argue that the ETS exceeds the agency’s authority under the Occupational Safety and Health Act. Even if it didn’t, they say, empowering OSHA to issue such a sweeping order would exceed the federal government’s power to regulate interstate commerce and violate the nondelegation doctrine, which constrains lawmaking by executive agencies.

Click here to read the full article at Reason.com

Child Vaccinations Begin in California with Toys and Gifts

SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — Scavenger hunts and blow-up animals greeted children at some of California’s vaccination sites Wednesday as children aged 5 to 11 got their first COVID-19 shots a day after the federal government approved kid-size doses of the vaccinations.

One enthusiastic 11-year-old summed up his experience in a word: “Amazing!” said 6th grader Raghab Vist. “I’ve been waiting a really long time to get vaccinated.”

Vist and his father, Hemant, who went to a vaccine clinic in San Jose, spoke of all the things they looked forward to doing again — eating in a restaurant, taking a train and traveling to family favorites like Disneyland. “It’s a very important milestone for us,” his father said.

As part of an ambitious plan to offer coronavirus vaccinations to California’s 3.5 million children in that age group, the state intends to offer the vaccines at locations including school clinics, pharmacies, pediatrician offices and county sites, many of which will launch in the coming days. Health officials said they are expecting 1.2 million initial doses of the pediatric vaccine.

Santa Clara County, the home of Silicon Valley where San Jose is located, starting doling out shots early Wednesday, and appointments quickly booked up. The county expects to receive about 55,000 doses this week and will open additional clinics at 80 school sites and send out mobile vaccine teams to low-income neighborhoods.

“We know that a lot of parents are anxious to get their children vaccinated with the holidays coming up,” said Dr. Jennifer Tong, who oversees the county’s mass vaccination program. “We received our shipment of vaccine yesterday, and we didn’t have any good reason to sit on it. So we said, let’s get this show on the road.”

Many of Santa Clara’s county sites were decorated with kid-friendly motifs like animals and included games like scavenger hunts, while others handed out coloring books, prizes and stickers to newly vaccinated young people.

Click here to read the full article at ap.com

LA City Vaccine Mandates Kick In Soon, Spurring Worry Over Extra Work, Confusion For Businesses

As the citywide mandates will go into effect Nov. 8, requiring patrons to show evidence of vaccination to enter restaurants, bars, coffee shops, breweries, wineries, gyms, spas, nail salons anBusinesses say the mandate will add another layer of complexity during the times when their resources are stretched thin as they deal with rental debt, rising costs and labor shortages.

Jennifer Febre, the owner of MacLeod Ale Brewing Co. in Van Nuys, has been closely following government mandates since the first days of the pandemic, but the latest Los Angeles city and county orders — which will not match one another — requiring customers to show proof of vaccination have left her worried and confused.

“I do appreciate how putting this mandate in place is perhaps ratcheting up the pressure to persuade people to finally get vaccinated,” Febre said, adding that at times it feels like her employees are being “deputized as law enforcement officers… I am concerned about putting my staff in that role of being the enforcer.”

As the citywide mandates will go into effect Nov. 8, requiring patrons to show evidence of vaccination to enter restaurants, bars, coffee shops, breweries, wineries, gyms, spas, nail salons and barbershops along with movie theaters and shopping malls, businesses say the mandate will add another layer of complexity during the times when their resources are stretched thin as they deal with rental debt, rising costs and labor shortages.

Click here to read full article on LA Daily News

New California laws 2016: What to expect in the new year


As reported by the Sacramento Bee:

Like bubbles ascending a champagne flute, a bevy of recently passed California policies will float to the surface and take effect this Jan. 1. Here’s a review of some of the major items.

Vaccines

One of 2015’s fiercest fights was over SB 277, which was introduced in the wake of a measles outbreak at Disneyland and requires full vaccination for most children to enroll in school. Schools will begin vetting students to ensure they have their shots in July, before the 2016-2017 school year begins.

Search warrants

Arguing our privacy laws lag behind our technology, lawmakers passed SB 178 to require search warrants before law enforcement can obtain your emails, text messages, Internet search history and other digital data.

Ballot fees

Thinking of filing a ballot initiative? You’ll need more cash. …

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Vaxxing Debate Plays on Emotion

From the San Diego Union-Tribune:

The California Capitol often is a magnet for sign-toting protesters, T-shirt-wearing activists who deliver petitions to legislators’ offices, and members of interest groups who travel to this “temple of democracy” to make their voices heard. Rarely, though, are such routine activities accompanied by displays of real passion.

But this year’s debate over SB 277, which would eliminate personal-belief vaccination exemptions for children attending public or private child care and schools, has sparked a debate that’s far testier than the typical ones that focus on budget, regulatory and even tax matters.

One side depicts foes as backwoods anti-vaxxers who believe the Earth is flat, while the other depicts supporters as enemies of religious freedom and tools of the pharmaceutical industry. The high drama is easier to understand given it involves public health, people’s deeply held convictions — and, most important, their children.

Few people question the value of vaccines, which … 

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