CA electricity costs much more than other states

Photo courtesy of lydiashiningbrightly, flickr

California’s rush to impose harsh government mandates cutting carbon dioxide emissions in the generation of electricity is raising the electricity bills of families and businesses across the state. Poor families are suffering the most.

In sharp contrast, Texas is successfully taking a free-market approach that is increasing the use of clean renewable energy and lowering electricity bills in the state.

The tale of two states offers a lesson for the nation.

The far-left Democrats who control state government in California have doubled down on their extremist campaign to cut carbon dioxide emissions – regardless of the cost and the pain they inflict on Californians, who are already struggling to pay some of the highest electricity bills in the nation.

California’s Democratic Gov. Jerry Brown said in September: “De-carbonizing the economy when the economy depends so totally on carbon is not child’s play. It’s quite daunting.”

“Daunting” is an understatement. After decades of severe state mandates and skyrocketing subsidies for renewable energy, Brown boasted that California gets about 30 percent of its energy from renewable sources – with a goal of 50 percent in seven years.

That may sound impressive, but Brown’s numbers referred only to electricity generation. He didn’t count transportation – the cars, trucks, buses, motorcycles, trains and planes that carry millions of Californians every day. Transportation accounts for about 39 percent of the Golden State’s energy consumption – and is almost all powered by carbon-based gasoline, diesel and jet fuel.

In 2004, at the dawn of California’s accelerated push into “de-carbonizing,” 10 percent of the state’s power came from approved renewable sources, with the total rising to 25 percent when electricity from large hydroelectric dams was included.

By 2016, California’s electric grid derived 25 percent of its power from renewable energy sources, with another 10 percent coming from large hydroelectric dams. While the dams also generate renewable electricity, they are loathed by environmentalists, so they don’t count towards California’s non-carbon energy goals.

Pushing California’s electric portfolio from 25 percent renewables, including hydroelectric dams above 50 megawatts, to 35 percent over a dozen years is a direct consequence of several laws and regulations intended to increase mostly wind and solar power generation. …

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