Take a scalpel to $345 million in California’s stem-cell research waste

Stem Cell researchJust as good scientists are drawn to conclusions by solid data, the decision whether to spend another $345 million by California’s state-run stem-cell research project should be based on an objective analysis as to whether it would be cost-effective. A rigorous cost-benefit analysis is not only fiscally prudent, it avoids being drawn into the moral dilemmas posed by stem-cell research, especially with respect to cells from human embryos.

Created in 2004 with the passage of Proposition 71, the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine was authorized to spend $3 billion in bond proceeds. But as is typical with most bonds, the interest payments would double the cost to $6 billion. CIRM has made $2.4 billion in grants and used $255 million for administration and prepaid interest — leaving $345 million remaining to disburse.

Should CIRM distribute the remaining $345 million (which, with interest, would amount to $690 million in repayment costs)? Should this remaining pool of funds be doled out?

To read the entire column from the Orange County Register, please click here.

Comments

  1. Of course they will do a “cost/benefit” study the same way Baldy, Mary Nicholls and Tiene papeles deLeon did a similar study on their “Green” agenda. I might mention that they gave us the highest gasoline and electric costs in the country.

  2. It IS worth it. It saves lives. It is nothing short of a miracle. Go bark up another tree.

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